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September 09, 1969 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-09-09

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, September 9, 1969

TUE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, September 9, 1969
U

I

c
AGC
By JERRY CLARKE
Anyone in the Middle Atlantic
states this summer who saw a
hag!ard ean wandering around
with a lantern probably thought
they had spotted Demosthenes in
his search for an honest man.
But what they probably saw was
an Atlantic Coast Conference
.ootball coach desperately look-'
ing for a quarterback.
Of the eight teams in the con-
ference, only two, South Carolina
and Duke, return proven signal-
callers. The rest of the coaching!
staffs have been doing everything
possible to come up with someone
to guide their attacks, some with
little success.
Paul Diet/.el, coach of the:

oache
South Carolina team can sit back
and watch the scramble from an
enviable position. Tommy Suggs
was a sophomore sensation on a 1
team that came on strong late in,
the season. He is but one of the
31 lettermen Dietzel has ready for
the upcoming campaign.
Suggs will be throwing his pass-
es to Fred Ziegler, last season'sj
All-ACC flanker. Warren Muir, a
superb fullback who led the squadI
in rushing is another returnee.'
The freshman team was undefeat-
ed and will contribute to the over-I
all depth. The only cloud on the
Gamecocks' horizon is a punishing
schedule that includes Georgia,
Florida State, VPI, and Tennessee.
Leo Hart will again guide the

look

for quarterbacks

Duke attack, and few teams have
better passers. Sixth in the NCAA
in total offense last season, Hart
has three of his top receivers back.
Proven fullbacks Phil Asack and
Don Baglien key the running
game, aided by the threat of
Hart's passes. Coach Tom Harp
has his problems with a leaky de-
fense that he hopes to rebuild with
ATLANTIC COAST
1968 Conference Standings
North Carolina -St. 6 1 0
Clemonson 4 1 1
Virginia 3 2 0
South Carolina 4 3 0
Wake Forest 2 3 1
Duke 3 4 0
Maryland 2 5 0
North Carolina 1 6 0

Only one offensive back, lead-i
ing ground gainer Charlie Bowers,
returns, so Edwards will have toI
revamp that unit. Darrel Moody
saw little action last fall, but will
have to hold down the quarter-
back slot. It should be the same
solid, unspectular type of team as
last season's champions.
Clemson's v e n e r a b I e coach
Frank Howard is looking for a

comes through at quarterback,
there will be few points on the
scoreboard this fall. Even talented
kicker Don Hartig cannot score if
the team doesn't get him close
enough. Tar Heel fans still look
to the future.
Wake Forest's new coach, Cal
Stoll, moans the loudest about thv
loss of his quarterback. Freddie
Summers led the offense to an

pair of lines as well as a new average of over 21 points a game,
quarterback. Ray Yauger, a pow- although the team only won twice.
{ erful fullback, and Frank Waters, Although 13 starters return, they
a veteran flanker, will key the of- will be nondescript without Sum-
fense, but will not move the ball mers' leadership. Jack Dolbin and
unless Howard finds somebody to Ron Jurewicz are adequate run-

Nine starters return from the
worst defense in the conference to
at least give Maryland some depth.
Stellar quarterback Alan Pastrana
graduated, as did top rusher Billy
Lovett. A mediocre backfield will
operate behind a veteran line. The
defense will be better, but there
is room for much more improve-
ment. New coach Roy Lester will
find it hard going to improve at
all.
Virginia lost its entire starting
backfield, including star runners
Frank Quayle and Jeff Anderson.
Quarterbacks Danny Fassio and
Brian Kitchen will handle t h e
quarterback position, but the glory
this season will come from defen-
sive ends Tommy Patton and Al
Sinesky. George Blackburn, ACC
coach of the year last season, will
have to work a few miracles this
one.

sophomores. Rookie defensive back
Rich Searl and All-ACC lineback-
er Dick Biddle will have to carry
most of the load if the Blue
Devils are toimprove.
Despite the loss of ten starters,
defending champion North Caro-
lina State will look much as they
did last year. Earle Edwards
smiles at the mention of Ron
Carpenter, his All-American pros-
pect at defensive tackle. Junior
Jack Whitely was sensational last
year, and will help insure a stingy
defense.

block. A veteran defensive back-'
field will help some, but the de-
fense was decimated by gradua-I
tion. Unless sophomores come1
through this fall, the Tigers will!
not roar in their usual manner. 1
Gayle Bomar, an outstanding;
quarterback on a poor team, grad-
uated from North Carolina. BillC
Dooley's TAr Heels are in a deep
hole, with only three starters back
on defense. Unless Paul Millei
AERO FLYING CLUB
is accepting
membyers now
FLY FOR LESS
The least expensive
way to learn

ners, but senior David Connors, a
transfer from Purdue who once
backled up Bob Griese, c annot
come close to replacing Summers.
The defense is experienced, but
it gave up too many points 1 a s t
season for that to console Stoll.

ART PRINT LOAN
Liven up your room-rent a print from Art

MASS MEETING
TUTORIAL PROJECT
Tuesday, Sept. 9
7:30 P.M.
3rd Fl., Conference Room
Radical Film Series
PRESENTS
HISTORIA DE UNA BATALLA
Distributed by Newsreel
A documentary by Manuel Octavo Gomez about the illiteracy,
campaign in Cuba in 1961. It shows the young people going
into the countryside to teach, and their successful return to
the city. The footage is juxtaposed with The Bay of Pigs
disaster of 1961, which serves to heighten the heroic struggle
of the Cubans to build a new society.
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10th
78-9-10-1 I
Admission 50c
CANTERBURY HOUSE
330 Maynard

Print Loan for a semester or year.
3511,3516
Tuesday 3-5
Wednesday 3-5, 7-9
Thursday 7-9
Friday 3-5

SAB

zi:=

Camel Race

A camel sponsored by the Mustang Ranch near Sparks, Nevada
rushes in hard at the wire to nose out his adversary. The event
was a revival of competition begun in 1866 between camel drivers
who used to haul salt across the desert to Virginia City gold and
silver mills.
JOIN
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS!
at Diag Table
Monday-Thursday
FIRST MEETING Thursday, 7:30 P.M.
Michigan Union, Rms. K, L, M, N
Belt Midrash of Ann Arbor
PRE-REGISTRATION FORM
Name
Campus Address
Phone Number_
(Check those courses which are of interest to you, fill out the
above form, and mail to Hillel Foundation, 1429 Hill St., Ann
Arbior)
FOR MORE DETAILS CALL 663-4129
1. HEBREW FOR BEGINNERS-Mrs. lana Mueller.
2. HEBREW FOR GRADUATES OF BEGINNER'S HE-
BREW-Mr. Alan Krashny.
.,. 3. READINGS AND CONVERSATION IN PROGRAM-
MATIC THOUGHT IN HEBREW-Mr. Krashny and
staff.
4. BASIC JUDAISM-JEWISH ETHICS-Rabbi Gerald
Goldman
5. READINGS IN THE OLD TESTAMENT-Rabbi Mer-
vin Tomsky.
6. AN ADVANCED SEMINAR IN JEWISH HISTORY
AND SOCIAL EVOLUTION: PALESTINE 1926-
1956-Mr. Joseph Katan and staff.
7. A SURVEY OF JEWISH COMMUNITIES IN EUROPE
AND AMERICA: A MODERN HISTORICAL AND
SOCIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF THE DIASPORA-
fMr. Michael Harrison and staff.
.8. PERSONAL WORTH AND COLLECTIVE IDENTITY
--Mr. Joseph D. Ben-Dak.
9. INTRODUCTION TO MODERN LITERARY YIDDISH
-Dr. Charles Krahmalkov.
10. INTERMEDIATE MODERN LITERARY YIDDISH -
Lecturer and time to be announced.
11. INTRODUCTION TO JEWISH MUSICOLOGY -
lecturer and time to be announced.
12. INTRODUCTION TO JEWISH ART-Lecturer and
time to be announced.
13. RESEARCH AND READING: individual preparp-
tion of Research papers with individual guidance
and availability of Beit-Midrash staff.
14. HEBREW SPEAKING CLUB-For those who can
converse in Hebrew there will be a Hebrew can-

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o' NATO L
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mmm' ALT Arlry " XT A T 1 A 1\Tir

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