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May 03, 1967 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1967-05-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

*HE MICHIGAN DAILY

Panhellenic Revises Rush for Fall,
Helps IFC Inform New Freshmen

For Direct Classified Ad Service, Phone 764-0557
Monday through Friday,.1 P.M. to 3 P.M.

By LUCY KENNEDY
Sorority rush next fall will try
to sell the sorority system rather
than ieldividual houses. An effort
will also be made next year to
examine pledge-training to see if
a way an be found for women to
learn more about the University
pr chosen academic subjects than
can do in the present system.
The emphasis on fraternity and
sorority living rather than the
merits of individual houses will
begin this summer with talks to
orientation groups and a booklet
on Panhellenic that will be sent
to all entering freshmen.
Efforts are being made to set up
a "mock rush" in the fall for
Husain Calls
For.Mor
Judgments
(Continued from Page 1)
member "we are certainly indi-
viduals but, in a deep and poig-
nant sense, we are also 'members
of one another' and tied to one
another in innumerable bonds,
tangible and otherwise.";
Husain, with 'experience in edu-
cation and scholarship, is the rul-
ing Congress Party's candidate for
the largely ceremonial presidency,
which will be decided in parlia-
mentary elections on May 6.
After his commencement ad-
dress he received an honorary
doctor of law degree along with
23 other honorary degree recip-
ients. Most of, them were also
educators w h o attended t h e
Sesquicentennial conference on
"Higher Education in Tomorrow's
W o r l d." T h e commencement
marked the closing of the three-
day conference.
Others who received honorary
degrees included:
Sir Eric Ashby, master of Clare
College, Cambridge; Alexander D.
Alevandrov, Soviet mathemati-
clan; Helmuth Becker, directoe of
Berlin's Max Planck Institute;
Mary I. Bunting, president. of
Radcliffe College; 'Jean Capelle,-
former French minister of educa-
tion.
Jacques Courvoisier, Swiss the-
ologian and president of the Eu-
ropean Council of Rectors; Luther
H. Foster, president of Tuskegee
Institute; Juan Gomes Millas,
Chilean, minister of education;
Jacqueline Grennan, president of
Webster College; Roger W. Heyns,
chancellor of the Berkeley campus
of the University of California.

women to practice rushing pro-r
ndritrpc nd diAaz . I th rt .in

By STEVE NISSEN

The summer picnics will be held

ceaures ana ascuss ne sys em i,
I Each summer the Int this year in Grosse Point, Bir-
general so a clear picture can be te Iterfrate-

presented to rushees.
"By elimination of some of the
'sugar coating' like skits," rush co-
ordinator Barbara Cohen,{'68, said,
"we hope to attempt an honest
presentation of the pros and cons
of sorority living rather than a
'snow job.' We want the rushees
to know what the situation is and
only pledge if they are convinced
it is right for them"
Rush this year will be more
concentrated with only four sets
as opposed to last year's five. Un-
like last year, rush will not begin
until after Labor Day weekend so
girls have the opportunity to go
through dormitory orientation
programs before rushing.
On the problem of binding
alumni recommendations in next
year's rush, Joan Ringel, assistant
zto the director of student organi-
zations, said, "We will back any
sorority that. wants to make an
issue of recommendations.'
There is a Panhel rule that says
a sorority must be willing to
pledge any. girl they ask back to'
final desserts.
"If," Mrs. Ringel commented,
'"a sorority asks a girl back to
final desserts, we will back the
sorority's right to pledge that girl
even if they can't get a recom-
mendation."
Mrs. Ringel hopes to encourage
sororities to set up pledge-training
programs that will include more
than the study of sorority rituals
to meet national requirements. "I
hope," she said, "sororities will
take up special extracurricular
activities and speaker programs,
in addition to present pledge
activities.
"I feel the sororities should em-
phasize the role of a sorority
woman as a student while she is
pledging, justras much as her role
in the sorority."
According to the chairman of
the Panhel Cultural Concerns
Committee, Bess Runyon, '69, an
effort to present more cultural op-
portunities will be made by shift-
ing the responsibility for lecturers
from individual houses to Panhel.
Panhel will again support the
writer-in-residence program, and
will send out a newsletter every
other week listing cultural oppor-
tunities.
Panhel President Ginny Mochel,
'68, said. "One of the over-all aims
of next year's Panhel activities will
be to make sorority women more
a part of the University com-
munity."
A leadership conference on
extracurricular opportunities and
methods of group motivation is
planned.

nity Council and Panhellenic As-
sociation sponsor an extensive in-
formation program aimed at in-
coming freshmen. There are three
major activities in the program:
-A tour of a fraternity or soro-
rity house given the summer
orientees;
--A slide program designed to
show various aspects of fraternity
and sorority life, and
-A series of picnics for incom-
ing freshmen and their parents
held at strategic locations in the
Detroit and Chicago area.
The tour and slide programs are
sponsored jointly by IFC and Pan-
hel, while the picnics are financed
solely by IFC.
The slide program and housing
tour are optional and held on the
first nigh of orientation. Several
rooms of a fraternity house are
are fixed up to represent typical
fraternity rooms, while others are
used to represent sorority rooms.
The slide program takes about ten
minutes and is designed to show
as many aspects of Greek life as
possible.

mingham, Dearborn, and the Chi-
'cago area. Letters are sent out to
all incoming freshmen inviting
them and their parents to attend.
Begun three years ago, IFC of-
ficers believe the picnics have been
a contributing cause for the large
fall rushes in recent years. They
explain that the opportunity to
talk with parents as well as po-
tential rushees is helpful in elim-
inating misconceptions
The picnics are staffed by ac-
tive frraternity men living in the
area as well as many IFC officers.
University academic counselors
and other personel are asked to
attend in an attempt to achieve
some sort of perspective on activi-
ties at the University .
The picnic program included
eight locations last year but has
been reduced to four this year.
The IFC explains that it "isn't
practical to have so many. There
simply aren't enough freshmen
coming from these areas to make
it worth while."

FOR RENT
FEMALE TO SHARE plush, modern
apt. Own. bedroom. Pleasant sur-
roundings. 10-min. from campus by
car Rent $77/mo. Phone 663-4585
after 6 p.m. C
CAMPUS-HOSPITALt
Girls - Large rooms. Kitchen, living
room with TV, laundry. 663-3591 or
662-1996, C1
WANTED-Male grad student with car.
Apt, with garage in exchange for 12
hours work per week. 663-2588. C2
ONE MAN NEEDED to share mod. 3-
man apt., air cond., dishwasher, park-
ing. Call evenings, 663-9705. C4
GRAD. GIRL WANTED to share mod.
bi-level, 4-man apt, for fall. Close to
campus. Call 665-3179. C5
FURNISHED ROOMS for male students.
One block to campus, or summer ses-
sion. Also efficiency apt. 1108 Hill, or
call 761-4126. C6
MODERN 2 MAN, balcony, ceramic tub,
parking, close to campus, storage and
washing, year lease from August.
$175/mo. Tom or Ed at 761-9266. CD
ROOMS FOR SUMMER $5 per week. TV,
LOUNGE. CALL 668-9593. C3
SUMMER SUBLET
FEMALE TO SHARE plush, modern!
apt. Own bedroom. Pleasant sur-
roundings. 10-min. from campus by
car. Rent $77/mo. Phone 663-4585
after 6 p.m. U
3 MEN NEEDED for luxury 4-man apt.
Air-cond., dishwasher. Give away. 912
Brown, No. 102. Call 662-7124 or -764-
3617. U8-
CAMBRIDGE, MASS.-5 room furnished
summer sublet. 5-10 min. walk from
Harvard. $90/month-will bargain-
contact: Sandy Krieger, c/o Board of
Student Advisers, Harvard Law
School. ti
SECOND HALF-From June 25. New
Studio for 1 or 2. Air-cond., modern
kitchen, the works. 307 Thompson, 2
blocks from campus. Call 662-2260. U3
ONE GIRL NEEDED to share modern
a/c apt., one block from South Quad.
Parking facilities. 326 E. Madison, No.
3. 665-9080. U4
ARBOR FOREST
3 men needed to fill out 4-man apt.s
Air-cond., very quiet, carpeted, mod-l
ern! For first half or whole summer.
Call 761-3965. Apt. 410. U6
ONE OR 2 MAID APT. Block from
Union. Pkg. 662-3562. U9
MODERN, spacious 4-man with off-
street parking, sun deck, and FREE
central air conditioning. Will rent for
till or part,- of the summer. Located
1 block from South Quad. 320 E. Mad-
ison. 761-0194. UA
ROOM AND BOARD
DON'T CART GROCERIES this sum-
mer! Join a CO-OP instead. Room
and board for 8 weeks: $150; board
only for 8 weeks: $100. Contact Inter-
Cooperative Council, 2546 Student
Activities Bldg., 668-6872. El

PERSONAL
WHAT ONE DAY of the week is thereI
NOT a stag or drag dancing group
meeting See The Singers' Guide,
On sale at newsstands and book
stores. or send 69c to Swingers' Guide,
11357 N. Shore Dr., Whitmore Lake.
Mich. 1F2
RENT Your TV from NEJAC
Zenith 19 in. all channel portables for;
only $10 per month. FREE service and
delivery. Phone 662-5671. F;
_. E
REMEMBER - Nationally advertised
franchise rings such as Artcarved,.
Keepsake, Columbia, and Orange
Blossom cost you 20-40% more. Don't
be misled by a name! Austin Dia-
mond, 1209 S. University. 663-7151. Fl
HELLO WEST VIRGINIA!! Sure do miss'
you around here. Letter coming soon.
F13
WAKE-UP SERVICE-Have your phone
ring at any designated time-day or
night-LOW RATES. DON'T BE LATE
FOR CLASS OR WORK -- AGAIN.
TELEPHONE ANWSERING SERVICE,
665-8871 (24 hours). F
STEVEN HOWARD-So now you're a
professional student. Be good now.
Don't forget there's always a place
for you here. The Breakfast Bird
Club is missing its charter member.
FB
FOR SALE-One Buco Motorcycle Hel-
met. $15. Call 761-2235. FC
DEAR BRUTE,
The Daily just isn't the same without-
you . . . neither am I.-Pove, Daisy.
-D
WANTED TO RENT
FALL TRANSFER student, junior,
wants to share 2-3-4 man apartment.
Write or call John Wood, 208 Mor-
rissey Hall, Notre Dame, Ind. Ph. 219
284-6680. LI
WANTED TO rent or sublet--2 or 3
bedroom furnished apt, for one year
beginning August. Call collect, John
Leonard, Chicago, 363-4300. L
POOR BUT RELIABLE New York boy
coming to study law. Need LOW rent
apt. ($50 range); kitchen privileges.
Prospective roommates, landlords
write: Paul Biderman, 610 West 196
Street, N.Y. 10040. LI
DESPERATELY NEEDED - Single apt.
for one month. 665-4903. L5
Ii

WANTED-Female Waterfront Dlrecer. VOLVO, 1960. A-1 condition. 5$
Must be 21 and have W.S.I. Salar- 3227 or 764-7498.
4500, Write: Camp Director. Groolied - - -
Tree Girl Scout Council. 235 Grand- 1964 PLYMOUTH 4 door sed
view Parkway, Traverse City, Mich. cond., under warranty, bes
H2 663-2024,
BABY SITTER to care for one small BIKES AND SCOOTE
baby 4 p.m.-midnight. Motiday-Fri-
day. Call 764-0410 between 4 and 12. 1965 YAMAHA. 250 c.c., new
ask for Mary. H1 HELP!! Must sell by Sat. Be
- _____ - r takes a beauty. Peter, 761-322

HELP WANTED

USED CARS

6ALE.AN iVANTED-Excluaive area,
work from your own home. Will
train. For interview call 453-0774. H:5
SECRETARY
Must read Spanish proficiently. W. K.
Kellogg Foundation, Phone 616 965-
1221, 400 North Avenue. Battle Creek.
Mich. 1H4
WANTED:
Sailors to crew Saturdays. D.R.Y.A.
(Detroit River Yachting Association).
Races and Sundays, Club Races on
Class C Cruising--Racing Sloop. Tele-{
phone after 7:00 p.m. Detroit 831-5700.
H3
BLOOD DONORS
URGENTLY NEEDED
$6 for Rh positive; $7, $10, and $12 for
Rh negative. Hours: Mon. thru Thurs.
9-4; Fri, 1-7. 18-21 years old need
parent's permission. 483-1894.
YPSILANTI
Detroit Blood Service
404 W. Michigan
H

1964 HONDA Scrambler 290 cc
cond. $425 or best offer. Call
663-8028.
BARGAIN CORNER

SAM'S STOI

Funds Halt Plan for
Disadvantaged Pupils

Has Genuine LEVI's Gc
LEVI'S SLIM-F ITS----$I
"White" and 5 Colors
For "Guys and Gals"
Cord. SLIM-FITS-$5
LEVI'S STA-PREST PA
Never Needs Ironing-
STA-PREST Slim-Fits $
LEVI JACKETS
{ "White" or
Denim-$7.50
LEVI'S Superslims--$4.S
LEVI'S Dungarees-$5.
S-T-R-E-T-C-H LEV
"White" & Colors-$6.
COTTON TURTLENECKS--
(Colors)
Open Mon. & Fri. Night
SAM'S STORFE
122 E. Washington

By ELEANOR BRAUN
A summer school program for
disadvantaged high school stu-
dents will not be instituted this
year due to lack of funds.
Started last year by the Literary
College Steering Committee, the
program sought financial support
from private foundations, accord-
ing to committee member Robert
Golden, '67. But, said Golden, "we
got a late start" and the founda-
tions were unable to provide
money at this time.
"The foundations expressed a
great deal of interest in the pro-,
gram, and it is almost 100 per cent
certain that it will go through
next year," said Golden.
Because of accreditation prob-
lems and a . shortage of state
appropriations, the school was un-
able to obtain any financial sup-
port from the state. The Univer-
sity was also unable 'to provide
support because it did not have

money available.
In a proposal outlining the
plans for the program, the steer-
ing committee projected a school
on the University campus which
would be staffed by University un-
dergraduates.
In a six-week session, students
from three Detroit schools would
take a variety of courses while at
the same time experiencing var-
ious facets of University social

U.S. savings stamps teach
early thrift and citizenship

and cultural life.
The aim of the program
familiarize disadvantaged
dents with theUniversity+
munity and thus encourage1
to seek higher education

is to
stu-
com-
them
after

SERVICES

high school.
A new committee, consisting of
steering committee members;,Stu-
dent Government Council mem-
bers and faculty, will refine the
present plans for the school's
courses and present the new plans,
to funding sources next October.

*FOR SPRING-SUMMER SESSION
cat the
MICHIGAN UNO

F,

FRIDAY NOON-MICHIGAN UNION, TERRACE ROOM-Free Public Discussion

U

Tonight we dance, my dear, on the money 1 saved
....,.,,, by buying used .textbooks
atfollett s.

SOUTH AFRICA:
A CHRISTIAN COUNTRY
A CHRISTIAN SHAME
THE REV. PIERRE J. DIL, 28-year-old Anglican priest
of Dutch nationality was expelled from S. Africa in
November 1966. He was presented with his deporta-
tion order after writing a series of articles critical of
South Africa's segregation laws. The order was signed
on the date he revealed from the pulpit that a mem-
ber of his confirmation class confessed to having
been planted as a spy by the political police. Also a
prison chaplain he was found guilty of smyggling let-
ters in and out of Sonderwater Prison.
FREE DISCUSSION OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
50 cent lunch available

SNACK BAR-Ground Floor

1967

Air Conditioned
Monday thru Thursday
Friday
Saturday and Sunday

7:00
7:00
8:00

a.m,.-10:00 p.m.
a. M.-8:00 p.m.
a.m.--8:000 p.m.

CAFETERIA-Ground Floor
Air Conditioned

How about
getting
a haircut
first?

Pierre Dil

Office of Religious Affairs, 2282 S.A.B.

Noon Service
Evening Service
Closed Memoric

11:30 a.m.-1 :00 p.m. Daily
11:30 a.m.-1 :30 p.m. Sunday
5:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m. Daily & Sun.

a

al Day

SUMMER

I

IS ALMOST HERE I

YOU CAN SAVE
Up
T933 0 OF
by buying used textbooks at Follett's
We have the most complete line of new and used
texts on campus. If you can't find the specific book
you need just ask one of our friendly experienced
clerks - they'll be glad to help you.
* Fast Friendly Service
" Art & Drafting Supplies
* All Your School Supply Needs
" Big Savings By Buying Used Textbooks

Subscribe now for
The Michigan Daily
This Summer

MAIN DINING ROOM-First Floor
Air Conditioned
Breakfast 7:00 a.m.-9:30 a.m. Daily
Lunch 11:45 a.m.-1 :30 p.m. Daily
Dinner 5:45 p.m.-7:30 p.m. Daily
Saturdays and Sundays closed, until Aug. 26th
Closed Memorial Day
Special Mother's Day Menu on May 14 from 12-3
BILLIARD ROOM-Second Floor
(Open to Men Only)
11:30 a.m.--1 1:00 p.m. Monday thru Friday
11:30 a.m.-6:00 p.m. Saturday
Closed Sundays and Memorial Day
MERCHANDISE STAND-First Floor
Tobacco items, candy, magazines, newspapers, blue
books, stationery, picture post cards, school sup-
plies, miscellaneous, toilet items and Kodak film;
information and check cashing service.

. -m -m m - - - - mm m . mm -m- - mm mmmminminmin min m m --m-mn m-m - m -
Yes, I would like to be a subscriber to THE MICHIGAN DAILY. I agree
to be billed later.
$4.00 for entire summer ($4.50 if by mail)

Even though we
have everything
for the student,
you'll have to
find your own
date for the

i
I

$2.00 for each term

($2.50 if by mail)

MAIL THIS COUPON
Ann Arbor, Mich.

to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard St.,
48104

BARBER SHOP-Ground Floor
Air Conditioned

dance. So why not stop by anaD ro
lI~**UMEEE** Who knows, you may buy something..

(Please Print) Last Name First Name Middle Initial

8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Daily except Sunday
Closed Mpmorinl Dav

i1

C4----4 Kl-

PI r,

1111I

III

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