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May 13, 1967 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1967-05-13

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9 saw

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, MAY 13

t 1XI/'fY1T" li~L'T' IY I-T

Chicago
Call! orn
Washing
New Yoe
Boston
Minnes
Kansas
Clevelan
Baltimo

Major League Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEA'
W L Pct. GB WI
16 7 .696 - Cincinnati 19
15 7 .681 1 Pittsburgh 14
nia 13 14 .481 5 St. Louis 151
gton 12 13 .480 5 x-Chicago 121
irk 11 12 .479 5 Atlanta 141
11 13 .456 5Y2 Philadelphia 121
ota 11 13 .456 5 x-San Francisco 101
City 11 14 .440 6 x-Los Angeles 91
"d 10 13 .434 6 New York 91
ire 10 14 .417 6 x-Houston 8

GUE
L Pct. GF
9 .679 -
9 .609 21/.
10 .600 2 Y,
10 .545 4
12 .538 4
12 .500 5
14 .417 7
14 .391 7
15 .375 8
17 .320 9 f

l.

!,Vi

*Tigers Win Sixth
Yarbrough Escapes Indianapolis Wreck; g
Andretti Favored To Win Qualifications Chisox Keep Pace

k

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Detroit 5, Boston 4
Baltimore 14, New York 0
Kansas City Z, Minnesota 1
Cleveland 12, Washington 5
Chicago 1, California 0
TODAY'S GAMES
Kansas City at Minnesota
California at Chicago;
Cleveland at Washington
Baltimore at New York (n)
Detroit at Boston

x-Late game not included.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Cincinnati 4, Philadelphia 2
Pittsburgh 5, Atlanta 2
St. Louis 7, New York 5
Chicago at Los Angeles (Inc)
Houston at San Francisco (Inc)
TODAY'S GAMES
New York at St. Louis (n)
Philadelphia at Cincinnati
Atlanta at Pittsburgh
Chicago at Los Angeles
Houston at San Francisco

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. {AP)-Lee watches at 168.5 to 169.4 m.p.h. Winning the pole is more a mat-
Roy Yarbrough, Southern stock Andretti holds the qualifying ter of prestige than of winning the
car racing star, crawled unhurt record of 165.899 set last year race, the No. 1 starter having won
from his smashed and burning when he led the race until his only seven of the past 50 Memorial
Mongoose Ford yesterday at the engine failed. Day classics. It also is worth
Indianapolis Motor Speedway in 'Speedway habitues figured most about $5,000 in special awards to
the third mishap in 14 days of of today's session would -be de- the car's chief mechanic.
practice for today's 500-mile race voted to determine who will sit Qualifying prize money is rela-
qualifications, beside Andretti in the three-car tively peanuts compared with a
Nobody has been injured-a tri- front row of the 33-car starting purse of about $700,000 for the
bute to rollbars, shoulder harness field. Stout possibilities included race proper. The fastest car each
and helmets. Lloyd Ruby, Wichita Falls, Tex., of the four days wins $1,200 the
Yarbrough, 28, of Columbia, veteran, in a car similar to the second $800, the third $600 and so

The unique four-wheel drive
STP turbine car, driven by former
500 winner Parnelli Jones, was an
unknown quantity in spite of run-
ning laps over 165 m.p.h. There
were indications Jones was trying
to match speeds with Andretti yes-
terday and couldn't, but maybe he
wasn't.
Other strong contenders for
high spots in the lineup will in-

The streaking Detroit Tigers
scored three runs without a hit,
another on an error and defeated
Boston 5-4 last night.
It was the six straight victory
for the Tigers and their ninth
triumph in the last 10 games
Earl Wilson limited the Red Sox
to four hits until the ninth whet:
he tired. Fred Gladding came on
to finish up.
Norm Cash homered for, the-,
Tigers, who scored two runs

clude two-time winner A. J. Foyt against Red Sox starter Darre

Suffering Irom
spring semester sID 0?
The hero of this
bestseller found
an Ingenious way out.

S.C., had been running over 164
m.p.h. and was expected to qualify
well up in the fields in the two
weekends of 10-mile trials.
The solid favorite for the pole'
position, however, remained U.S.
Auto Club champion Mario An-
dretti.
Fastest All Month
The Italian-born Nazareth, Pa.,
driver has been wheeling his
Brawner Hawk around the track
faster than anybody else all
month. He stepped up the pace a
little more yesterday with 'an un-
official lap caught by various stop-

one Yarbrough wrecked, and Dan
Gurney, international racer from
Santa Ana, Calif., in one of his
own Eagle Fords,
About 40 cars have shown speeds
of 160 or more in practice, in-
dicating it would take at least that
to make the field. The minimum
in last year's record-smashing
field was 158.646.
Best Performance
The best performance in the
first of four qualifying sessions
wins the pole, the inside starting
position on the three-car front
row, regardless of later speeds.

on down to sixth place. Jr., Houston, Tex.; Gordon John- Brandon in the third inning 3n
There is additional prize money cock, Hastings, Mich., Joe Leonard, three straight walks, a wild pitch
for the over-all speed standings San Jose, Calif., and Roger Mc- and an error.
for the entire trials, ranging from Cluskey, Tucson, Ariz., who had The Tigers' final run in the
$1,000 for best down to $100 for so A weighth came when Al Kaline walk-
tenth. an unofficial 167.1 Friday. ed and reached third on an at-
Soccer Discovers America in Big Way

and now...
A NEW AFTER SHAVE & COLOGNE

By The Associated Press
Soccer discovered America in
1967.
Sports historians may choose to
put it the other way and rule that
America discovered soccer. Either
way it will go down as a notable
event.
The discovery came about when
astute sports promoters suddenly
realized that the North American
continent was only a century be-
hind the rest of the world. Soccer
had been the dominant sport in
more than 130 nations, not ,in-
cluding the U.S. and Canada and
for progressive nations, they felt
that this was a bit backward-to
say the least.,
Then the rest of the world got
in on the discovery of America,
finding it to be an untapped gold
mine where money was heaped
around in rich lodes, waiting to
be spent on talent from far-flung
nations and continents.
Two Leagues

sociation, are pushing the game
that is king virtually everywhere
else.
The NPSL, headed by commis-
sioner Ken Macker, has the jump
with a 10-year television contract
with the Columbia Broadcasting
System at approximately $1 mil-
lion a year.
For the Sunday afternoon tele-
vision arm-chair viewer who has
been brought up with double
wings, flankers and home runs
as part of his athletic vocabulary,
soccer's glossary of heading, trap-
ping and corner kicks is something
new.
Soccer is a simple game to un-
derstand. Surprisingly few changes
have been made to the 17 original
rules devised by the English Foot-
ball Association in 1863.
The first-time viewer must fam-
iliarize himself with a few basic
points. Soccer is played with 11
men on a side with generally five
forwards forming the offense, two
fullbacks and a goalkeeper on de-

There are two 45-minute periods
with a short halftime. There are
no time outs for coaching advice,
no breaks in play except for seri-
ous injury or a goal. The NPSL
permits three substitutions during
the game, one for the goalie and
two for other players.
The playing field is called the
pitch and is approximately 110
yards by 80 yards. The goalie is
the only player reasonable sta-
tionary and he also is the only
man who can use his hands.
Players may kick, head or
"chest" the ball into a goal 24
feet wide and 8 feet high.
When a -ball goes out of bounds
it is put back into play by means
of a two-handed over-the-head
throw.
If it goes out of bounds over
the end lines or goal dlines, last
touched by/ the defending team,
the attacking team is given a
corner kick where the goal line
meets sideline. A goal kick is taken
by the defense when the ball goes
over the goal line but it last
touched by the offense.
I I

tempted steal when catcher Bob
Tiliman's throw hit relief pitch-
er John Wyat t in the side of the
head. WyVaY-i remained-in the game
and surrenderec' the run on a
sacrifice fly,
J. C. Martin drove in his first
run of the season with a fifth
inning double. giving the Chicago
White Sox a 1-0 victory over Cal-
ifornia.
Joe Horlen. who won his fourth
game without a loss, limited the
Angels to five hits but needed
ninth inning help from Bob Lock-
er to nail down the victory.
Chicago's run was unearned fol-
lowing an error by Jim Fregosi.
Don Pavietich drove in thre
runs with a double and a bases-
loaded single and led the Cincin -
nati Reds to a 4-2 victory over
Philadetphia.
Sammv Ellis limited the Phils
to five hits and-after the first
two innings-had little trouble in
picking up his third victory in five
decisions.
Matty Alou and Roberto Cle-
mente cracked third inning home
runs last night and paced Pitts-
burgh to a 5-2 victory over the
Atlanta Braves.
The solo shots gave the Pirates
and Billy O'Dell a 2-1 lead they
never relinquished. O'Dell gave up
four hits, struck out three and
walked two before a blister on
his left hand forced him out of
the game with one out in the
eighth.
Jim Palmer pitched a one-hit-
ter, allowing only Horace Clarke
to reach base on a leadoff single
in the seventh inning, as the stag-
gering Baltimore Orioles ended a
six-game losing streak by crush-
ing the New York Yankees 14-0.
Max Alvis drove in five runs
with a homer and a single and
paced Cleveland to a 12-5 rout of
the Washington Senators.
SRed (11d Use
I Daily Ch' ssi fieds

Sr

i

Now, two professional leagues,

the National rProfessional Soccer fense. Three halfbacks perform
League and the United Soccer As- both duties.
I ~TflWI

4

I would have sworn that (Iersey) had been right there with
a tape-recorder in the dormitories, the greasy spoons, the
cars and bars." TheNewYork Times
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STORY is a mixture of W.C. Fields, Bob
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Srvddtntis
'U e VCa 10 1 I.
JHow to spot and get rid of),
Pallid peepers$
There's no sparkle in those baby-blue
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Fluorescent fade-out. good is still left in the world. Go to
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What you need for that sallow pallor
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Whole lot of it available at Sunset
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Lip lingo.'
They're letters from good buddies
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The good books. Racquet squad.
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bad sport,.
College fatigues.
That's the uniform you wore all semester.-UT Down.
Get rid of those o.d.'s (olive drabs). That's all you've known summer,
Break out the white levis. And throw ort after summer. A change of palate
a colorful Mexican serape., ,would do you good. In Bermuda a
few savory morsels of Hopping John
with a sauce of Paw-Paw Montespgrt
usually does the trick,.

z
r
3-
rn
.t

E
f
r

3f][ i The Magazine of Discovery
53 West 43rd Street, New York, N.Y. 10036

r

77p11IC
A Artrann

Add~uress_____________
city State_ _
USNSA is non-profit for students. j
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