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August 29, 1967 - Image 16

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1967-08-29

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OUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAA

Y, AUGUST V

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INTERNATIONAL PRESENTATIONS, 1967-1968
Special PreSeason Concerts
NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC, LEONARD BERSTEIN, Conductor
TUESDAY AND WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12 and 13, 8:30 P.M.
in Hill Auditorium.
TICKETS: 8.0-85.5O-85.06-$4.00-$3.00- 82.00

Fraternities Integrate Academic,
Social Aspects of Student Life

Choral Union Series
(in il Auditorium)
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA . .. . JEAN MARTINON, Conductor
.. (2:30) Sunday, October 1
FRENCH NATIONAL ORCHESTRA, with EUGENE ISTOMIN, Pianist ......Monday, October
VIENNA SYMPHONY...........................................Thursday, October

9.
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"CARMINA BURANA" - opera by, Carl Orff .. . ................ (8:00) Sunday,
Expo '67 Production with Les Ballets Canadiens

October 29

CHRISTA LUDWIG, Mezzo-soprano ................... ............... Tuesday, October
ROYAL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA OF LONDON'...............Wednesday, January
VACLAV NEUMANN, Conductor
NATHAN MILSTEIN, Violinist........ ... .. . ... .. . ... .. .. . ....Monday, January
H ELSINKI PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA .........................Saturday, February
VAN CLIBURN, Pianist .................... .................. Friday, March
TORONTO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA.................. ........Thursday, March
SEIJI OZAWA, Conductor

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Interfraternity Council Presi-
dent Bruce Getzan, '68, points out
in his letter to freshmen in the
September issue of IFC Commen-
tary that one of the biggest func-
tions of the fraternity system is
to establish opportunities for the
student to remain an integral part
of the "outside community" and
bring his learning experiences to
it.
Next year's IFC program shows
an added emphasis on both learn-
ing experience and their integra-
tion with University and commun-
ity affairs. t
Higher academic standards for
pledging went into effect this
year. It now is necessary to have
a 2.2 overall average except in the
College of Engineering) to pledge
a fraternity instead of a 2.0.
IFC established the higher aca-
demic standards for pledging to
discourage anyone who has no
interest in the academic side of
University life, according to Doug
Marshall, advisor to fraternities.
Also in an attempt to stress
academics, some fraternities ex-
perimented last year with having
a graduate student live in the
house for advice with studies and
promotion of discussions and
meaningful activities.
In an attempt to bring frater-
nities into the sphere of campus
political activity, IMCtook stands
last year on non-fraternity issues
of campus concern. IFC endorsed
the student petition for a referen-
dum on submitting class rankings
to the draft and sponsored na-
tional leaders to speak on the
issue.
Last sprifig, IFC also moved in-
to campus political activity by
initiating;action that would bring
a Student Government Council
motion allowing non-students to
participate in University organi-
zations to a referendum this fall.
Arrangements are being made
to expose fraternity men to non-
classroom learning through an
effort by some chapters to have
Tuskegee Institute exchange pro-
gram students housed in their
fraterniites.
This comes in the face of ac-
cusations locally and nationally
that some national fraternities
practice discrimination.
The University's IFC, a leader
in the area of discrimination, was
one of the first fraternity organi-
zations to recognize the discrimi-

nation problem when it set up a De facto discrimination and
membership committee several the embarrassment of being part
years ago. of national fraternities that do
This membership committee discriminate in some of their
brought fraternity constitutions chapters are the most serious
under review and is prepared to I problems IFC has to deal with.
review any complaints of discrimi- Proposals have been made to
nation in pledging. strengthen the IFC Membership

Committee and to allow it to
consider such problems as the
failure of minority groups to rush
houses of different cultural
backgrounds.
Another potential program for
next year encompasses an inter-
fraternity debate on such issues
as the future of fraternities, the
twentieth century businessman
and his ethics, and the effect of
student activism on university
decision making.
Rush begins this year with a
series of open houses Sunday.
Sept. 17. This will be followed by
other contacts with the fraterni-
ties through smokers and infor-
mal get-togethers.
If a fraternity decides in all
night sessions known as "hash"
they want a rushee they tender
him a bid. Bids can be tendered
at any time during the year fol-
lowing open houses.
The University has one of the
oldest fraternity systems in the
country. There have been fra-
ternities on the campus since
1845. Demand for fraternity hous-
ing has been high for a long time
and several new houses have been
built in the last five years.
IFC was awarded first prizes in
1953-54 and 1954-55 in national
competition among collegiate fra-
ternity systems.
A full fraternity intramural
program is carried on throughout
the year in addition to individual
fraternity participation in Home-
coming, Winter Weekend, and IFC
Sing.

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4

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Initiations Play a Key Role in Fraternity Life

SEASON TICKETS: x30.00-$25.00-$20.00-15.00-12.00
SINGLE CONCERTS: (counter sale begins September 11):
$6.00-$5.50-$5.00-$4.00-$3.00-$2:00
Extra Series
(in Hil Auditoriuu)

Pan helenic Coordinates
M~any Sorority Programs

"LAN DOF SM I LES"-operetta by FRANZ LEHAR ..............
(original Viennese production starring Giussepi di Stefano)
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA.......... ....
JEAN MARTI NON, Conductor
YOMIURI JAPANESE ORCHESTRA .................
ARTHUR FIEDLER, Conductor;
NATION BALLET from Washington, D.C.
STOCKHOLM PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA.
ANTAL DORATI, Conductor

..Monday, September 25
Saturday, September 30
.Friday, November 10
.Wednesday, January 24
.........Friday, March 8

By LUCY KENNEDY
The University's 24 undergrad-
uate sororities are loosely con-
nected through the Panhellenic
Association coordinating rush, ad-
ministrative problems and pre-
senting a sorority stand on cam-
pus issues.
The most massive and unified
effort of Panhel is rush. Panhel
decided last year to change to
only one rush in the fall, so fresh-
men would be rushing without
preconceived notions on the mer-

SEASON TICKETS: $15.00.$12.50.$10.00-$7.50-0$6.00
SINGLE CONCERTS (counter sale begins September 11):
86.00-$5.50-$5.00-$4.00-$3.00-$2.00
Chamber Arts Series
(in Rackhtn Auditorium)
CHAMBER SYMPHONY OF PHILADELPHIA ................... Saturday, October 21
ANSHEL BRUSILOW, Conductor
BERLIN PHILHARMONIC OCTET.......................... Sunday, November 5
BERLINER CAMERATA MUSICALE.............................Monday, November 13
CHICAGO LITTLE SYMPHONY..................................Saturday, January 20
THOR JOHNSON, Conductor

OFFICE HOURS
CirculIation- 764-O558
Complaints-9-l 1:30
Office Hours-i -4
Clcssified-764-0557
Call between 12:30 and 2:30
EE

its of an individual house and to
ease the strain on sorority
women in general. Previously
sororities had conducted two
rushes a year-one in the fall for
upperclassmen and a larger rush
in the spring for freshmen.
After severa1 indoctrination
sessions, giving freshmen tips on
"what rush is really -like" and
explaining the mechanics of get-
ting through four sets of pledg-
ing, rushees go through all houses
on campus in the first set known
as "mixers."
During mixers, the rushee is
introduced to asmany girls in the
sorority as possible - meeting
about one new person exery six
minutes. After this set and all
other sets the rushee finds out
through her rush counselor if she
has "made it" for the next set at$
the sorority of her choice.
The four sets put the girls into
a variety of clothes and situa-
tions culminating in "final des-
serts"--the set sororities use for
their big pitch through candle-
light ceremonies and favorite.
sorority songs.
If the rushee chooses to pledge
the sorority that chooses to pledge
her at a session after final des-
serts known as "preferencing,"
she will be given a bid and car-
,ried up the steps of her sorority
by members of neighboring fra-
ternities on "pledge Sunday."
In addition to setting up rules
for rush Panhel attempts to set
a tone of informality for struc-
tured"rush. Girls may also pledge
at any time during the semester
through open rush.
Panhel, last year, endorsed ex-
tension of sophomore hours and
later agreed to allow sophomores
who live in sororities to have no
hours if the University discon-
tinued them for women living in
the dorms.
Sorority women also used Pan-
hel to voice their opinion on issues
that did not effect them directly
such as endorsement of the 18-
year-old vote. In conjunction with
IFC, Panhel initiated a referen-
dum last year to rescind an SGC
ruling that would allow non-stu-
dents to participate in University
activities.
By far, though, the most cru-

cial problem Panhel has had to
deal with over the last year has
been discrimination.
In 1965 Panhel set up a mem-
bership committee to review the
constitutions and by-laws of all
sororities on campus to check for
any discriminatory clauses.
No sororities have been accused
of discrimination in their con-
stitutions at this time and no in-
stances of discrimination have
been brought to the committee's
attention.
De-facto segregation and inter-
ference from nationals cause the
greatest problems in discrimina-
tion.
On some campuses-Wisconsin,
for example-sororities have been
given the ultimatum of signing a
statement saying that there is no
outside (usually alumnae) inter-
ference in membership selection
or going local.
Many sororities on this campus
must have a recommendation
from an alumna saying a girl is
acceptable to pledge the girl.
Often, an alumna will refuse to
recommend a girl because she is
from a minority group.
With this in mind, Panhel pass-
ed a resolution last year con-
demning t h e recommendation
system in hopes that nationals
would be pressured into changing
their procedures.
Many conservative alumnae will
not even admit a discrimination
problem exists and the tenuous
financial situation of the houses
makes it difficult for sororities
to coerce their nationals into
action. The nationals own most'
of the houses on this campus and
sororities must go to them for
improvements- or additions to
their houses.
The Cultural Concerns Commit-
tee of Panhel has been fairly in-
active for the last year,,although
it did help sponsor the writer-in-
residence program. Next year,
however, they hope to bring girls
with common interests in art and
music together for workshops. In
addition, Panhel hopes to have
several of the Tuskegee exchange
students live in sorority houses
and perhaps sponsor an all cam-
pus forum on the Tuskegee stu-
dents' problems and observations.

A

MUSIC FROM MARLBORO (vocal and instrumental) ...........(2:30) Sunday, February
MUNICH CHAMBER ORCHESTRA..............................Thursday, February
SAN PIETRO ORCHESTRA OF NAPLES........ ..... ......Friday, March

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SEASON TICKETS: $20.00-$15.00-$10.00
SINGLE CONCERTS (counter sale begins September 11):
$5.00-$4.00-$2.00
Sxth Annual Dance Festival
(in Hill Auditorium)
HARKNESS BALLET......................... . .. Friday, October 13
Company of young dancers from New York in a program of classical and contem-
porary ballet
OLAETA BASQUE FESTIVAL OF BILBAO ......................(2:30) Sunday, October 22
First American tour of this colorful group in a pageantry of songs and dances of
the Basque country.
JOSE MOLINA BAILES ESPANOLES .................................. Friday, October 27
Spanish Dance Company in a program of classical and folk dances, and flamenco.
SERIES TICKETS: $8.00-$0.00-$5.00
SINGLE PERFORMANCES: $4.00-$3.00-$2.00
Christmas Music
(in Hill Auditorium)

I

IT'S NONE OF YOUR
BUSINESS. . . BUT
IT COULD BE!
Join the Daily
Business Staff
DROP BY
420 MAYNARD STREET
OR CALL

"MESSIAH"' (HANDEL) -Three Performances ........................ Friday, December
University Choral Union, and............................ Saturday, December
Interlochen Arts Academy Orchestra ......................(2:30) Sunday, December

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TICKETS: $2.50-82.00-81.50-81.00 (Counter sale begins October 10)

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