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May 09, 1967 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1967-05-09

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, 31AY 9, 1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, MAY 9, 1967

[inois Barred
or Two Years
CAA Prohibits Post-Season Play
Of Football, Basketball Teams

Netters Face MSU

After WS
Michigan's tennis team, washed
out of a 3-0 lead against Western
Michigan University yesterday,
faces stiff opposition from an un-
defeated Michigan. State team in
East Lansing this afternoon.
Coach William Murphy claims
that today's matches will "proba-
bly be the closest we have played
all year," and that the team is
going to have to play their best
to uphold their unbeaten record.
"State has a well balanced team
and their scores with other schools
have been similar to ours."
The Wolverines, who boast three
shutouts, will face an MSU lineup

HICAGO AP-The University
[llinois, still groggy from Big
. penalties for a $21,000 athletic;
h fund, was slugged Sunday
h two years' probation by the
ional Collegiate Athletic As-
ation.
uring the probation period, II-a
is' football and basketball
ms are prohibited from en-
ing in posteseason competition
. the football team cannot make
imitments for television ap-
,rances.
owever, two scheduled football
ws this fall will not be affected
le the commtments were made
)r to Sunday's crackdown by
NCAA.
he NCAA action climaxed a
month ordeal during which Il-
)s coaches Pete Elliott'., foot-
; Harry Combes, basketball;
i Howard Braun, basketball as-
ant, were forced to resign and
athletes were declared ineligi-
five of them permanently.
'he NCAA's move will prevent
nois from participating in the
ketball playoffs and Rose Bowl
nes until the school returns to
4d standing, which would be
sooner than May 7, 1969.
Walter Byers, executive direc-
of the NCAA, said the penalty
id have been stiffer had it not
n for cooperation received from
school, which exposed the
d, and the action taken by the
Ten, which forced the res-
tion of the three coaches.
}r. David D. Henry, University
Illinois president, withheld
nment yesterday on the NCAA
;ion.
3yers said the NCAA's policy-
king council could not have
ed the Big Ten from doing
re than it did and that the con-
ence followed policies made in
recent meetings in Houston

to penalize the head coaches in-
volved rather than having an as-
sistant shoulder the blame when,
violations occur,
The NCAA's council also voted
Sunday to distribute a special re-
port to its 670 members on the
status of proceedings before the
Sports Arbitration Board in the
squabble with the Amateur Ath-
letic Union.

JWashout
w hich has been accumulating im-
pressively one-sided victories of
its own in recent matches and
Coach Murphy notes today's ac-
tion could turn out either way.
Michigan will go with its reg-
ular lineup of Dick Dell, Brian
aMrcus, Pete +Fishbach, Ron Tee-
garten, Ed Waits and Bob Pritula
against a strong MSU team. The
Wolves hope to enter the -last
week of the regular season with a
7-0 conference record.
Next week, they play Purdue and
a contending Illinois team in their
last two dual meets.

0

WEEKEND WRAP-UP:
Purdue Wins Invitational Golf
As Floridan Captures Honors

From seventh place to first in
one year; that's what the Purdue
golf team did over the weekend
in the second renewal of the
Northern Intercollegiate Invita-
tional Golf Championships held
on the Michigan course last week-
end.
Purdue's six-man team card
1,539 strokes among the five low-
est team players over four rounds
of stroke play.
But the Universities of Florida
and Miami, invited to a field
largely made up of Big Ten teams
gave formidable showings. The
Florida team finished second by
seven strokes and team leader
Dave. Oakley took individual hon-
ors with 78-77-74-71-300. Team-
mate Richard Spears followed
with 302.
Michigan's John Schroeder, the
leader after Friday's 36 holes, tied
for third at 304 with Purdue's
leader Steve Mayhew.
The Michigan linksmen were

one point behind after the first Baseball Rained-Out
day, but carded a disastrous third
round to end up out of the run- The Michigan baseball team was
ning in fourth place with 1,562. rained out in successive double-
Ohio State's Jeff Parry got a headers over the weekend but
birdie on the fourth hole of the managed to keep alive their title
final round. He followed that up hopes as league-leader Minnesota
with a hole-in-one on the par- dropped a 4-2 game to Iowa.
three 175 yard fifth hole. Friday's bout with Illinois was
cancelled because of rain after
the first inning of play. The Sat-
Thinclads Beat Illini urday game at Purdue was post-
poned until Sunday because of wet
The Michigan track team stop- grounds. Even then the downpour
ped the University of Illinois Sat- increased until it was obvious that
urday afternoon as the Wolver- the field would be in worse shape
ines' Jamie Dennis ran the 3000 for Sunday's games.
meter steeplechase in a Ferry Field Today at Kalamazoo, the Wolves
record time of 9:17.4. will take on Western Michigan's
Michigan took all the distance Broncos, seeking revenge for an1
races above 440 yards and all field 8-0 drubbing last week.
events except the long jump and Western is riding a 13-game
triple jump, both captured by winning streak. Saturday the
Illinois' John Sandeen. Broncos' unbeaten Jim Johnson
In adidtion to Dennis perform- pitched an 8-1 victory over Notre
ance, Ron Kutchinski cracked the Dame.
880-yard run Ferry Field record
with a 1:50.1 mark. Jack Harvey T
boomed out a new shot put mark SPORTS' WEEK
of 57 feet 6 inches, besting hisf
own effort of 56 feet 11 inches. TUESDAY, MAY 9
* * *

0

REASONS WHY
YOU SHOULD USE KWIK 'N KLEEN-ANN ARBOR'S COMPLETE CLOTHING CARE CENTER

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Complete Laundry Service

7. "Coin" Operated Laundry
8. Skilled Alterations and Repairs
9. Drive-in Windows and Night Drop-off Box

outh Africa Faces Olympic
rivestigation on Racial Bias

Household Cleaning
Year Around Storag
"Coin" Operated Dr

rEHRANj Iran (R)-Facilities
Mexico City for the 1968 Olym-
s are 80 per cent complete but
ith Africa isn't nearly that
se to having its entry sanction-
by the International Olympic
nmittee.
t'he IOC, meeting here Sunday,
Lrrest Clay;
lond Set
iQUSTON (R)-A quiet and
dued Cassious Clay answered
ot guilty" when asked by U.S.
t. Judge Ben C. Connally yes-
-day how the boxing champion
d to a federal grand Jury in-
tment of a charge of refusing
be drafted into the armed
ces.
the indictment, charging vio-
ion of the Selective Service Act,
i been returned earlier in the
Bond of $5,000 was set with $500
be deposited in cash.
"onviction could bring a fine
10,000 and a jail sentence of
to five years, but Clay's at-,
neys say they are confident
it he eventually will win his
ht for exemption from the draft
ause of being a Black Muslim
rister.
* * *
SEW YORK (P')-A match be-
een Germany's Karl Milden-'
'ger, and contender Thad Spen-
in Germany in September is
ected to kick off an ambitious
ht-man elimination tournament
determine a successor to heavy-
ight champion Cassius Clay.

directed a three-man mission tof
visit South Africa in August andt
report to President -Avery Brund-s
age by the end of September onc
that country's racial situation.
South Africa has a nationalY
policy on racial segregation but at
report recently submitted byc
Frank Brauh, the country's Olym-
pic chairman, indicated a relax-
ation of discrimination in the na-
tion's Olympic team.
Fourteen African nations al-
ready have denounced the changes
in policy as insufficient and
threatened to boycott the Olym-
pics if South Africa is allowed to
compete.
Meanwhile, Pedro Ramierz re-
ported preparations 80 per cent
complete and said that two sepa-
rate high speed routes have been
constructed between housing and
competition sites.
In other business at the IOC
meeting, the Soviet Union pro-
posed that the international com-
mittee be enlarged, presumably to
include more members from Com-
munist or third world nations.
IOC members from 41 countries
agreed in principle for enlarging
the membership, a conference
spokesman said, but no moves will
be made before the next meeting
at Grenoble, France, in 1968.
Athletes competing in the 1968
and future Olympics will have to
sign an oath that they will not
use dope to improve their per-
formances, and must agree to sub-
mit to medical checks on drugs,
the committee ruled yesterday.
An Olympic medical center will
be set up at the games where of-
ficial doctors and specialists can
check for the use of dope or
stimulants, the IOC announced.

Netters Blank OSU
The Wolverine tennis team con-
tinued in high form on their quest
for the Big Ten title, blanketting
Ohio State 9-0 for their seventh
straight dual meet victory (6-0 in
conference play).
Sophomore ace Dick Dell upped
his league mark to 5-0 as the en-
tire net squad sent their Buckeye
opponents down in straight sets.

Tennis-Michigan at Western
Michigan
Baseball-Michigan at Western
.Michigan
WEDNESDAY, MAY 10
Golf-Michigan at Michigan
State University
FRIDAY, MAY 12
Baseball-Iowa at Michigan,
1 p-m.
Tennis-Michigan at Purdue
Golf-Spartan Invitational,
East Lansing

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Join The Michigan Daily

4

*41

r

I know that Follett's gets a new supply of textbooks

c

almost every day, but why do you guys keep coming

)

r ni . r a r rr

"

back day after day when you graduated 30 years ago?
We've grown accustomed to the thrill
is
r -,.

Pre -vacation

*4

offer.

All the travelers checks you want-up to $5,000 worth-
for a fee of just $2-. At banks everywhere, during May only.

I

Major League Standings

AMERICAN LEAGUE

ngton
SYork

w
13
12
12
101
10
11
9
9
8
8

7
7
10
9
10
12
12
12
11
12

Pet.
.650
.632
.545
.526
.500
.478
.429
.429
.421
.400

GB
1A
2
2
3
3%
4%
4
4j4
5

-Late game not included.
SUNDAY'S RESULTS
troit 1, Baltimore 0
nsas City 4-3, New York 1-8
ston 9, Minnesota 6
Acago at Cleveland (rain)
liornia 5, Washington 0
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
.shington 7, Minnesota 4
w York 3, California 1 (7th)
ly games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
w York at California (n)
ston at Kansas City (2, t-n)
ishington at Minnesota (n)

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct. G
Cincinnati 17 8 .680
Pittsburgh 12 7 .632 2
St. Louis 13 9 .591 21
Atlanta 12 9 .571 3
Philadelphia 10 10 .500 41
Chicago 10 10 .500 4;
San Francisco 10 12 .455 51
New York 8 13 .381. 7
Los Angeles 8 13 .381 7
Houston 7 16 .304 9
SUNDAY'S RESULTS
Chicago 5, St. Louis 4
Atlanta 5, Cincinnati 3
San Francisco at Pittsburgh (rain)
Los Angeles at Philadelphia (rain)
Houston at New York (2, rain)
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Atlanta at Philadelphia (rain)
Los Angeles 4, Houston 2
San Francisco 9, Chicago 2
St. Louis 6, Pittsburgh 5
Only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
Cincinnati at New York (n)
Atlanta at Philadelphia (n)
St. Louis at Pittsburgh (n)
San Francisco at Chicago
Los Angeles at Houston (n)

B
Sw
,IBC

too

Folletts receives new
shipments of new & used
books daily

I

It's easy
getting
addicted
to Follett's
FBD*
s(fresh
Books Daily)

I

It happens every year-classes are over-
enrolled; new courses unexpectedly open up;
students put off buying books til the last minute
-then you can't find the books you need.
Well, you need books so what can you do about
it? The first thing you should do is stop down
to Follett's. Because of our national buying
and selling power, we can get out of stock
books on campus faster than anyone else.
FOLLETT'S gets shipments daily during the
rush-sometimes even hourly.
Daily we phone in rush orders to our home
office or directly to the publishers.. . we make
soecial shipoing arrangements to get them

You can save real money by
buying First National City
Travelers Checks now for your
summer vacation trip. Read
how.
Normally travelers checks carry
a fee of a penny a dollar. It costs $1
for $100 worth of checks, $2 for
$200, $10 for $1,000, and so forth.
Now, during May only, you can
buy any amount you need - up to
$5,000 worth - for only $2, plus
the face value of the checks. You
could save up to $48. (For less than
$200 worth, of course, the fee is less
than $2.)
If you're planning a trip to
Europe, what you save from this
offer could pay for an extra day on

world - airlines, car rental agen-
cies, steamship lines, hotels, mo-
tels, restaurants, stores, etc.
You can spend them as easily at
Le Drugstore as at the drugstore.
And they're just as convenient on
a weekend trip as on a world tour.
Fast refund in case of loss
The greatest advantage of First
National City Travelers Checks is
that you get your money back
.promptly if they're lost or stolen.
We've built a security network of
25,000 banking offices around the
world where you can get lost
checks refunded fast. On the spot.
How do you fnd the nearest re-
fund offices? In the Continental
U.S., call Western Union Operator
7;A ,rn l w've sunnhed el1Pl ~verv

Offer good only in U.S. and
Puerto Rico, May 1.31, 1967
Never before has such complete
protection for your cash been so
inexpensive. So act fast. Get your
summer supply of First National
City Travelers Checks now. They
can be bought at most banks and
savings institutions.
If your vacation money is in your
local bank and you won't be home
until after May 31, you can still
take advantage of this offer. Just
mail this ad to your parents and ask
them to send your money to you.
Note to all banks and
savings institutions
During the month of May, we're
making this unusual introductory

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