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August 04, 1967 - Image 6

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Michigan Daily, 1967-08-04

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRMA'Y, AUGUST 4,1961

PAGESIXTHE ICHGAN AIL FRIAYAUGUT 419I

AL

Votes

Divisional Structure;

igers
CHICAGO (P)-American League
owners voted unanimously last
night for eastern and western
divisional breakdowns in baseball
but National League owners asked
for more time to study the pro-
posal.
Club owners met with baseball
Commissioner William Eckert for
more than two hours in a joint
meeting of the two leagues after
each league had conducted sepa-
rate meetings.
The project of two divisions
within each league was tabled as
the two-day meetings closed. Joe
Cronin, president of the American
League, said, "We had a great,
long discussion and covered many
facets of the plan.
Playoffs
"American League owners all
voted for divisional play," said
Cronin, who added the plan would
call for the winners of each of
the five-team divisions to meet in
a best 3-of-5 playoff for the right
to represent the American League
in the World Series.
Eckert said, "The National
'League did not want to move this
fast. The proposal did not come
to a vote and, therefore, I took no
action. We certainly will want to
study this plan."
Warren Giles, president of the
National League, said the main
objection to the plan was it was
not presented in time to give the
National League time to study it.
Fourth Plays First
"I don't think baseball should
be put in a position where it is
possible for a fourth place club
to play a first place club in a
World Series."
What Giles meant was if the
American League did go into di-
visions, one divisional team with
a poor record might defeat their
divisional team and represent the
league in the championship.
In other action, Charles O. Fin-
ley, 'owner of the Kansas City
Athletics, issued the following
statement:
Move Rumors
"For some time there have been
persistent rumors that the Kansas
City Athletics would be moved.
A number of cities have been
mentioned, particularly Oakland.
I've had a number of conversa-
official and nonofficial, and they
tions with people in Oakland, both
expressed great interest in our
baseball team.
"But no specific proposals have
been made.
"In the past few days I've been
approached by officials who asked
me to consider moving to Seattle.
Agai,n no specific proposals have
been made to us. To date, we have
not had a lease proposal for the
proposed stadium from Kansas
City authorities. Nothing else is
under consideration.
"Under the league constitution,
no move of any kind can be made
without the affirmative vote of
seven members of the league and
have made no application to
move."

Defeat

Baltimore,

50
Bosox Beat
Kansas City;
Braves Win
By The Associated Press,
The Detroit Tigers whipped the
Baltimore Orioles 5-0 yesterday
night behind the three-hit pitch-
ing of Denny McLain in a game
called by rain with the Tigers at
bat in the eighth inning.
Detroit scored twice in the
eighth on a run-scoring single by
Norm Cash and a sacrifice fly by
Ray Oyler when rain began to fall
for the third time.
Bill Freehan knocked in two of
the Detroit runs with a fourth-
ining bloop single and a drive in
the sixth which caromed off the
foot of losing pitcher Bill Dillman.
Al Kaline launched two of the;
three Detroit rallies with doubles,
scoring on Jim Northrup's double
in the third and on the single byI
Cash in the eighth.
McLain, bringing his record to
13-12, hurled hitless ball until
Brooks Robinson singled with two
outs in the fourth.
The Boston Red Sox moved to
within two games of the American
League lead by defeating Kansas
City 5-3 and Atlanta smashed
seven home runs in downing the
Chicago Cubs 10-3 to highlightj
yesterday's light baseball sched-
ule.

4
''

-Associated Press
MAKING HIS MOVE
Coming up on the outside, Van Nelson (278) of Minneapolis makes his move in the Pan Amgerican
Games men's -5,000 meter final Wednesday in Winnipeg. He came on to win the race. Leading in
Louis Scott (283) of Detroit, whi finished secon d. The other runner is Canada's Bob Finlay (223)
of Toronto.
TRA VEL BARRED:
Au SelectsTerre Ellis
To Win Astrodome Bouts

-Associated Press
BERT CAMPANERIS of the Kansas City Athlet ies is tagged out by Boston Red Sox catcher Mike
Ryan at the plate in the eighth inning of the game at Fenway Park yesterday. Boston won, how-
ever, 5 to 3.

*1

PAN-AM ACTION-

Harvard Eight Dowi
In Preliminary Row

Mike Andrews drove in three
runs with a homer and a two-run
A' aA JaW single for the second-place Red
Sox, who closed in on the idle
Chicago White Sox. Boston spot-
ted the A's three runs in the
opening inning before rallying
ing H eat for single runs in the second and
third and two more in the sixth.
in Hank Aaron stroked No. 27 of
drove toward a silver medal inthesao fo his 1,500th cre
women's basketball by defeating ruen sebatted orin wshile Deni
Canada, 43-42, picked-up a bronze MnkeaandTio Franconi
medal in field hockey with a 1-0 Mer homers.Sto ranco theit te
triumph over Canada and con- oheh r.io es n
shots were solos.

WINNIPEG, Canada (A)-Har-
vard's mighty eight defeated
Canada's crew in a head-to-head
duel of unbeaten haevy-weights
yesterday in preliminary rowing
trials of the Pan American
Games.
The victory on the Winnipeg
fieldway sent the Crimson colleg-
ians into Saturday's final and
made them a heavy favorite for
the gold medal. The Canadian
crew gets a second chance in the
repechage heats today for another
shots at the Yanks.
Stroked by Ian Gardiner of
Topsfield, Mass., the Harvards,
unbeaten since they lost to the
Vesper Boat crew in the 1964
Olympic trials, surged to the front
at the start and had a 112 length
lead at the halfway mark of the
2,000 meter course. They won by
that margin in 6:18 with Argen-
tina third, 25 lengths behind.
Four With Cox
Canada led all the way in win-
ning the first heat of the fours
with coxswain by about a length
over Cuba with Mexico third and
Peru fourth in the opening event
of the rowing program.
Canada thus qualifies for the
finals Saturday. The three losers
go into a repechage, second

chance for losers, Friday with the
two losers of the second heat.
The first three in the repe-
change today also qualify for the
final with the two heat winners.
Argentina's South American
champions came from behind to
beat the United States by 12
lengths with Paraguay a badly
trailing third in the second heat
of the fours with cox.
The United States' pairs with
coxswain came from behind to
beat Argentina by about three
lenghts with Brazil a far trailing
third in the first heat of this
event.
Argentina
Argentina led the United States
until nearly 200 meters from the
finish. Then the Yanks came on
and pulled away when the Argen-
tine bow, Rafael Gabba, leaned
over his oars and stopped rowing.
It took the power of stroker Vi-
cente Dean to get them across.
U.S. pairs with cox from the
University of Pennsylvania rallied
to win the heat in the pairs with
coxswain.
Rowing in a stiff cross-wind,
the Harvards hit a 36 beat half-
way through the race and main-
tained it to the end.
Meanwhile, the United States

HOUSTON (P) - Mohammed
Ali, still claiming to be the best
boxer in the world, has picked
Ernie Terrell and Jimmy Ellis as
the winners of tomorrow's opening
matches in the tournament de-
signed to determine Ali's successor
as world heavyweight champion.
Saturday's doubleheader of 12-
rounders sanctioned at the Astro-
dome by the World Boxing Asso-
ciation place Terrell against Thad
Spencer and Ellis against Leotis
Martin.
Ali made is picks for newsmen
Wednesday, shortly before Federal
Judge Joe Ingraham refused to
permit the champion to go to
Japan to fight while appealing a
June 20 conviction and five-year
prison sentence for faillure to be
inducted April 28 into military
service.
Whip Everyone

te:ed his style after that of the "Frazier doesn't have anyone to

tinued to advance men in the box-I
ing tournament.
With swimming concluded and
track taking the day off, activities
at the Games dwindled to pre-
liminary heats in rowing and scat-
tered activity on the baseball,
boxing and basketball front.
Women's Basketball
The American victory over Can-
ada in women's basketball came
on a free throw by Lola Ham of
Laverne, Ikla. She got her chance
when Canada's Diane Doyle
charged her. Miss Ham converted
the second of her two free throws.
Action was close throughout the
game and particularly so in the
final minute. First, Lois Finley of
Claude, Tex., scored one of two
free throws to put the United
States ahead 42-41 with 45 sec-
onds to play.
Twenty seconds later, Mary
Coutts, a physical education
teacher from Victoria, converted
one of two free throws to tie 42-
all. Then came Miss Ham's deci-
ding free throw.
Mrs. Carole Phillips Aspedon,
captain of the United States team
from Hamburg, Iowa, scored 10
of her 18 points in the second half
to keep the United States in the
game. Miss Finley was second high
for the Americans with 12 points.
Mrs. Coutts paced Canada with 11.
The victory kept the United
States moving toward a silver
medal in the tournament behind
Brazil which is unbeaten in the
six team double round robin play.
The United States which will con-
clude competition in a game with
Cuba Friday has a 5-2 record.

The total was one short of the
major league record of eight,
shared by five clubs.
The loss was the second-place
Cubs' five in their last six games
and dropped them six full games
behind the idle St. Louis Card-
inal.

champion.
Like Ali, Ellis frequently drops
his left hand low and dances
around the ring.
"I've always done that, not just
because I worked several years
with Ali," Ellis said. "I drop the
left sometimes while trying to get
a man to commit himself. It's like
a fish. You put a worm on the
line and get a fish to bite at it."
"He's a fisherman," said An-
gelo Dundee manager of Ellis and
former trainer of Ali. "Ellis uses
that left to sucker a guy into a
mistake."
The WBA tournament has all
the top 10 challengers except Joe
Frazier, ranked No. 2, and George
Chuvalo, ranked No. 10.
The Saturday winners will meet
winners of later matches between
Karl Mildenberger and Oscar Bo-
navena and Floyd Patterson and
Jerry Quarry.
Frazier Mistaken
Ali said Wednesday he believes
Frazier made a big mistake by
passing up the tournament.
"He'll just have to sit it out
now while the others are working
the next six months," Ali said.

fight."
Clay also said he did not think
Frazier was too impressive while
scoring a technical knockout over
Chuvalo last month.
"Three of the fighters in the
tournament Terrell, Patterson and
Bonavena have whipped Chuvalo,"
Clay said.
Terrell, a former WBA cham-
pion, gave Spencer the cold shoul-
der at an informal weighing for
the four Astrodome fighters Wed-
nesday.
"When I first met him," said
Spencer, "he was an all-right guy.
Now he's walking around like he's
king of the walk."
"If we speak, I have to speak
first," Spencer continued. "He's
looking at the rest of us guys like
we're hungry fighters- bunc of
hiam-'an'-eggers."
"He's just lucky to have a guy
like Ali around who'd fight him,
because he couldn't draw flies by.
himself," Spencer added. "I can't
understand the way he acts either
after the beating he took."
Terrell lost a 15-round decision
last February to Clay in the As-
trodome. Terrell suffered an eye
injury that required surgery.

Clay Carroll, making his first "I'm picking Terrell and Ellis
start of the season, limited the but the champ is the man who
Cubs of seven hits in 8 1-3 innings can whip everybody in the world,"
to post his fourth victory against Ali said. "I'm not the champ le-
seven losses. gall yand financially but you just
can't take the title away from
Starter Joe Niekro, the loser, me."
was the victim of the first four
homers. Francona, Torre, and The WBA stripped Ali of his
Boyer all delivered in the first title after he refused induction.
inning. Ali said Sonny Listen, from

Menke's came leading off the
second. Aaron homered and Torre
doubled ahead of Boyer's sec-
ond homer in the third.
Rookie Bill Stoneman, the Cubs'
third pitcher, served Torre's sec-
ond homer to open the fifth. Both
of Torre's blasts went to the
wrong field - sailing deep into
the right field bleachers. He also
doubled, singled and walked in
five appearances.
If 11

Major League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE

whom he won the championship
in 1964, could whip half of the
boxers in the tournament.
"And I could whip the rest and
everybody in the audience," he
said.
While Ali was making another
appearance at the federal court
hiouse, the four heavyweights in
the Saturday matches were taking
pre-fight physical examinations
at the Astrodc ne.
Ellis, 27, is a former sparmate
of Ali an dis not too pleased with
frequent remarks that he has pat-

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438 W. Huron Phone 663-2033

U I

. 4

I I

. Chicago
Boston
Detroit
Minnesota
California
Washington
Cleveland
Baltimore
New York
Kansas City

w
59
58
56
54
56
52
47
46
45
46

L
43
46
46
48
50
54
57
57
57
61

Pct.
.578
.558
.550
.529
.528
.491
.452
.446
.441
.430

GB
2
3
5
5
9
13
1312
14
15y;.

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Boston 5, Kansas, City 3
California at New York (rain)
Detroit 5, Baltimore 0 (called 8th)
Only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
Washington at California (n)
New York at Kansas City (n)
Boston at Minnesota (n)
Detroit at Cleveland (n)
Chicago at Baltimore (n)
NATIONAL LEAGUE

TOP FIVE LE
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING - 225 at bats-
Staub, Houst., .355; Clemente,
Pitt., .354; Cepeda, St.L., .342;
Aaron, Atl., .331; Gonzalez,
Phil., .325.
RUNS-Aaron, Atl., 78; San-
to, Chic., 78; R. Allen, Phil.,
75; Brock, St.L., 74; Wynn,
Houst., 72.
RUNS BATTED IN - Wynn,
Houst., 84; Cepeda, St.L., 82;
Hart, S.F., 76; Clemente, Pitt.,
72; Santo, Chic., 71.
4HOME RUNS-Wynn, Houst.,
27; Aaron, AtM, 26; Hart, S.F.,
24; Santo, Chic., 22; Banks,
Chic., 19; Cepeda, St.L., 19;
Perez, Cin., 19.
PITCHING - 9 Decisions -
Hughes, St.L., 10-3, .769; Veale,
Pitt., 12-4, .750; McCormick,
S.F., 14-5, .727; Jarvis, At.,
11-4, .732; Nolan, Cm., 8-4,
.667; K. Johnson, At., 10-5,
.667.

AGUE LEADERS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING - 225 at bats-F.
Robinson, Balt., .331; Kaline,
Det., .320; Yastrzemski, Bost.,
.320; Conigliaro, Bost., .305;
Carew, Minn., .301.
RUNS-McAauliffe, Det., 68;'
Killebrew, Minn., 67; Yastrzem-
ski, Bost., 64; B. Robinson,
Balt., 63; Tovar, Minn., 63..
RUNS BATTED IN - Yas-
trzemski, Bost., 78; Killebrew,
Minn., 75; F. Howard, Wash.,
67; Conigliaro, Bost., 63; F.
Robinson, Balt., 60.
HOME RUNS - Killebrew,
Minn., 32; F. Howard, Wash.,
28; Yastrzemski, Bost., 27; F.
Robinson, Balt., 21; Conigliaro,
Bost., 18; Mantle, N.Y., 19; Mc-
Auliffe, Det., 19.
PITCHING - 9 Decisions -
Horlen, Chic., 13-3, .813; Lon-
borg, Bost., 15-4, .789; Mc-
Glothlin, Calif., 9-3, .750; Spar-
ma, Det., 11-4, .733; Merritt,
Minn., 7-3, .700.
STRIKEOUTS - Lonborg,
Bost., 155; McDowell, Cleve.;
154; Boswell, Minn., 144; Pet-
ers, Chic., 142; J. Nash, K.C.,
139; Tiant, Cleve., 139.

SCORES

I

Detroit
Baltimore

000 201
000 000

02-590
0-030

7 innings, rain
McLain and Freehan; Dillman,
Watt (8) and Etchebarren. W-
McLain, 13-12. L-Dillman, 5-5.

Keep Abreast of All
The News-Order

St. Louis
Chicago
Cincinnati
San Francisco
Atlanta
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
Los Angeles
Houston
New York

w
64
59
57
56
53
50
49
46
47
40

L
41
48
50
50
49
51
53
57
60
62

Pct.
.610
.551
.5.33
.528
.520
.495
.480
.447
.439
.392

GB
6
8
81..
8 i
12
13%
17
18
22z

FRIDAY, AUGUST 4
AFRICAN PERSPECTIVES ON WORLD TENSIONS
an international dinner and discussion
PANEL: Mr. Joseph Laoye-Nigeria
Mr. Moses Mokoso-Uganda
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DINNER-6 P.M. COST-FOREIGN STUDENTS 50c
PROGRAM-7:15 OTHERS $1.00
AT THE PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Avenue
Reservations: 662-3580 orv662-5529
SPONSORED BY THE ECUMENICAL CAMPUS MINISTRY

gh8

3irigan

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To subscribe for the Fall, just fill ot the form below and
mail it to 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor
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YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Atlanta 10, Chicago 3
Only game scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
San Francisco at New York (n)
Houston at Philadelphia (n)
Atlanta at Chicago
Cincinnati at St. Louis (n)
Los Angeles at Pittsburgh (n)

STRIKEOUTS - Marichal,
S.F., 162; Bunning, Phil., 157;
Jenkins, Chic., 144; Nolan, Cin.,
143; Perry, S.F., 140.

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