100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 03, 1967 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1967-08-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, AUGUST 3, 1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY'

PAGE

THE MICHIGAN DAIlY PAGP

Place Riot Blame
On Subversives'
Report Cites Black Power Groups
As Force Behind Violence in Cities

SIMME RING MIDDLE EAST:
hicidents Disturb Cease-Fire;
Arabs Split on Summit Talks

$

By The Associated Press
Staff investigators for the
House Committee on Un-Amer-
ican Activities yesterday pointed
the finger of blame for violence
in the cities at such groups as the
Student Nonviolent Coordinating
Committee, t h e Revolutionary
Action Movement (RAM), and a
militant Negro rights group called
ACT.
In a report recommending a full
committee investigation of the
role of subversive elements, the
staff said the chief activity of
communits has been to whip up
hatred, rather than to directly
instigate riots.
'Extreme' Hatred
The report said the hatred thus
generated is "so extreme and vio-
lent in nature that riots "can be
sparked by a perfectly normal and
proper police action."
The still-secret police report
said that the Student Nonviolent
Coordinating Committee initiat-
ed rioting in Atlanta last year
and in Nashville, Tenn., last April,
and that an August 1965 riot
in Chicago was "deliberately
planned in advance by certain
leaders of ACT who are also

ago's Puerto Rican section, al-
though it said subversive groups
have tried to take advantage of
them.
In the early phases of the Watts
riot, it noted, "the Communists
were afraid to go into the Watts
area" although later "in typical
fashion, however Communists at-
tempted to exploit and take ad-
vantage of the riot."
Communist Incitement
The only specific instance of
direct Communist incitement of
riot cited was in New York's Har-
len riots of 1964.
"Evidence contained in the re-
port makes it clear that a Com-
munist organization, the Progres-
sive Labor Party, played an im-
portant role in instigating the
1964 Harlem riot," the report said.
The preliminary report also in-
cludes material on riots in Cleve-
land in 1966, based primarily on
a grand jury investigation, and in
Cambridge, Md., last month,{
based on news accounts.
Newark and Detroit
Committee investigators are
now in Newark, N. J., and De-
troit, looking into last month's
widespread rioting in the Negro

-Associated Press
ADVISORY COMMISSION MEETS
Sec. etary of Labor Willard Wirtz, foreground, testified yesterday before President Johnson's Ad-
visory Commission on Civil Disorders. Seated around the table from left are: Police Chief Herbert
Jenkins of Atlanta; Charles Thornton, of Los Angeles; Rep. Charles Corman (D-Calif); Mayor John
Lindsay of New York; Gov. Otto Kerner of Illinois, David Ginsburg, executive director; Roy Wil-
kins, executive secretary NAACP (head turned) and I.W. Abel, president United Steel Workers.
TRIM FOREIGN AID BILL:
Committee Recommends Hike

By The Associated Press
Jordanian and Israeli troops ex-
changed gunfire across the Jordan
River yesterday for the second
straight day. Each side blamed the
other for the breach in the cease-
fire.
Military sources in Amman said
Israel suffered losses in men and
vehicles while the Jordanians hadI
no casualties. In Tel Aviv, an Is-
raeli spokesman said three Is-
raelis were wounded slightly.
The fighting, the fifth inter-
ruption of the cease-fire on the
river since the six-day Arab-Is-
raeli war in June, broke out about
two miles north of the Damia
Bridge. It began in the morning,
was broken off, then resumed and
continued until midafternoon.
.Summit' Difficulties
In another development in the
simmering Middle East crisis,
Arab foreign ministers meeting
in Khartoun, Sudan, were report-
ed in difficulty in their efforts
to prepare for a summit meeting
to work out a unified approach
in dealing with Israel.
Delegates from the 13 Arab Na-
tions, who long have feuded among
themselves, met for three hours of
heated discussion. The conference
opened Tuesday.-
Jordan River
In the Jordan River fighting,
thte Israeli spokesman said Jor-
danian troops fired first on a
routine Israeli patrol on the west
bank and the Israelis replied. That
fight lasted about 55 minutes, he
said.
Fighting erupted again a short
time later in an exchange also
initiated by Jordan, the Israeli
spokesman said.

A Jordanian military commu- Arab nations, led by Egypt,
nique issued in Amman said 12 geria and Syria, to halt prof
Israeli military vehicles, including ganda attacks on them bef
four armored personnel carriers they will agree to a summit me
and four cars armed with heavy ing.
machine guns, rolled down to the The Sudan News Agency
river and opened fire on Jordanian ported that, in an effort to av
positions in the hills east of the reopening old wounds, two k
river. items have been removed fr
Returned Fire the conference agenda.
Jordanian forces returned the They are proposals that all A
fire, the communique said, and it nations break diplomatic relatic
added: "It was believed that many with the United States, Bata
losses were sustained on the West Germany and any other 1
mechanized forces of the enemy." tions regarded as having heb
After a brief interruption in the Israel in the war, and that A
firing, the communique said, the currency reserves be withdra
exchange of gunfire was resumed from banks in those countt
and lasted for more than four The moderate Arab nations
hours. opposed to these demands.

Conference
In Khartoum, delegates to the
Arab foreign ministers conference
were tight-lipped and grim as
they emerged from their morning
meeting.
The conference chairman, Pre-
mier Mohammad Ahmed Mah-
goub, told reporters the ministers
"began to study the agenda, and
it was a deep and frank study."
"The discussion concerns con-
certed efforts to eliminate the re-
sults of Israeli aggression," he
said.
Conference sources said Saudi
Arabia, Morocco and Tunisia,
moderate Arab nations, are in-
sisting on a pledge by the leftist

Advisory Council
In Amman, in an attempt
resolve his domestic political pro
lems, King Hussein has establish
a royal advisory council to ass
in formulation of policy. He a
accepted the resignation of Pr
mier Saad Jumaa and asked hi
to form a new government.
Hussein had tried to set up
broad-based coalition cabinet lb
month but was unable to find
willing candidate to head it.
The advisory council is made
of all of Jordan's former premie
who. represent various politic
factions. It will have no execut
power, the day-to-day administr
tion of affairs being left to Jumi

members of the Revolutionary areas of the two cities. _
Action Movement and are using The report was written by the in
ACT as a RAM front." committee's staff director Francis
The study said many of the dis- J. McNamara, and approved by;
orders were spontaneous, includ- Reps. William M. Tucks, D-VMA., WASHINGTON (P)-The House health services by the states, authorized ceiling at $2,72
ing the Watts riot in Los Angles and Albert W. Watson, R-S. C., Ways and Means Committee yes- Some states, notably New York, 500. All the amounts wo
in 1965 and a 1966 riot in Chic- members of a subcommittee terday approved legislation carry- had expanded such programs to subject to later appropriati
S.......... * ,......... ..... .NA................ ... ......ng a 12 per cent increase in take in a large proportion of their Military aid was undistu
Social Security benefits. populations. the House committee. The
DA ILY O FFIC IA L BU LLETIN At the same time, the House After seven weeks of closed ses- panel chopped this fron
Foreign Affairs Committee com- sions, the House Foreign Affairs million to 391 million. Th

25,496,-
uld be
ions.
rbed by
Senate
m $596
e Sen-

HELD OVER-4th Week

The Daily Official Bulletin is an t
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for, which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility, Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to E
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar, items appear once only. ;
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
information call 764-9270.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 3
Day Calendar
Bureau of Industrial Relations .sem-
minar-"Evaluating the Effectiveness of
the Personnel-Industrial Relations De-
partment": Michigan Union, 8:30 a.m.
to 5 p.m.E
Audio-Visual Education Center Film
Preview-"You're No Good'.' and "Da-
vid and Hazel": Multipurpose Room,
Undergraduate Library, 1:30 p.m.
International Center Tea-603 East
Madison, 4:30 p.m.
School of Music Concert-David Her-
man , 'carillonneur, Burton Memorial
Tower, 7:15 p.m. m
Linguistic Institute Forum Lecture-
Prof. Charles F. Hockett, Cornell Uni-
versity, 'Reconstruction and Episte-
mology": Rackham Lecture Hall, 7:30
p.m.
School of Music and Dept. of Speeh
Opera-Mozart's "Don Giovanni". Ly-
dia Mendelssohn Theatre, 8 p.m.
General Notices
Astronomical Colloquium: Fri., Aug.
4, 2 p.m., Room 807 Physics-Astronomy
Bldg. Dr. Peter Bodenheimer, Princeton
University Observatory, will speak on
"Dynamical Phases of Eary Stellar Evo-
lution."
PLANS FOR' SUMMER
COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES
Sunday, Aug. 6, 1967, 2 p.m.
Time of Assembly-1:15 p.m.
Places of Assembly-Regents. Presi-
dent and other executive officers, min-
ister, speaker in the Kalamazoo Room
of the Michigan League where they
may robe.
Deans and other administrative of-
ficials taking active part in the exer-
cises, in the Hussey Room of the
Michigan League, where they may robe.
Members of the faculties in Room
2071 Natural Science Bldg., where they
may robe.
Students of the various schools and
colleges, in Natural Science Bldg. as
follows:
Section A-Literature, Science, and
Arts - Front part of auditorium,
west section.
-Education-Front part of auditor-
,un, center section.
Architecture-Front part of audi-

.RR<. ." ti: :r o pleted work on a $3.1-billion for-
eign aid bill which is only 2i9
torium, center section (behind Educa- million below President Johnson's
lion).
-Law-Front part of auditorium request. A tough fight in Congress
east section. was forecast for the bill.
Dearborn Campus-Front part of au- The Senate had passed by voice,
ditorium, east section (behind Law). vt
Section B-Graduate - PhD candi-{vote yesterday a compromise bill
dates, Room 1053. authorizing $4,865,750.000 for the
-Masters candidates, rear part of space program this' fiscal year.
Section C-Engineering-Room 2054 This was about $235 million less
-Business Administration - Room than the President asked.
2042 The amount was agreed upon
-Public Health-Room 2033 (behind by a Senate-House conference.
Music). The House, which initially voteds
-Pharmacy-Room 2033 (behind Pub-, a lesser reduction, now must ap-
lic Health). poetecmrms eoei
-Nursing-Room 2033 -(behind Phar- prove the compromise before it
Macy). goes to the President.
-Dentistry-Room 2033 (behind Nurs- 'Tax Increase
ing),.a nces
-Medicine-Room 2033 (behind Den- The Socal Security measure is
tistry) Resources-Room 2023 (west a slimmed-down version of Presi-
end). dent Johnson's proposal to pro-
-Social Work-Room 2023 (behind vide larger pensions and other
Natural Resources), benefits, would increase Social
-Flint College-Room 2023 (behind
Social Work). . Security taxes paid by wage earn-
March into Hill Auditorium: 1:45 p.m. ers a maximum of $44 next year.
Academic dress. Thn,. .arriir..-nn. -tha

Committee completed work on the
aid package authorizing $3,168,-
919,000 for the global military
and economic aid program in the
current fiscal year and $3,495,-1
800,000 for 1969.
This contrasts sharply with ac-1
tion taken last week by the Sen-
ate Foreign Relations Committee
which limited its version o fthe
bill to one year and set the

ate bill has a section designed to
discourage arms sales to under-
developed countries through the
Export-Import, Bank. The House
bill does not.
Another feature of the House
bill which probably will create a
fuss is a new section under which
the Foreign Affairs Committee
would assume jurisdiction over the
Food for Peace program.

i
L
t
a

CINEMA 11

MAYR
A KENNETHI
flOOU ON

presents

ROBERT ROSSEN'S
LI LITH

Phone 434-0130
At&n4 Ot CARPENTER ROAD

The Area's Finest Drive-in is easy
to reach - 2 miles south of
Washtenaw Rd. on Carpenter.
BOX OFFICE
OPEN 8:00 P.M.

I-'

(1965)

"One of the most haunt-
ingly beautiful films in

FIRST
RUN

NOW SHOWING

FIRST
RUN

1

years.

As impressive as

1
,

Doctoral Examination for Ralph An-
drew Luken, Natural Resources Admin-
istration; thesis: "Planning-Program-
ming-Budgeting System: A Strategy for
Project Evaluation," Thurs., Aug. 3.
Room 2020 Natural Resources Bldg., at
9 a.m. Co-Chairmen, Ayers Brinser, R.
L. eWier.
Doctoral Examination for Jerome Ra-
bow, Social Psychology; thesis: "Orga-
nizational Goals and Teachers' Role
Behavior: A Comparative Study of Five!
(Continued on Page 4)

Th ose earning no more tnan
$6,600 would pay no additional
taxes. The tax would apply, for
the first time, to income up to
$7,600, or $1,000 above the present
base.
The legislation i sexpected to
go to the House for debate in'
about ten days.
The bill also. would put restric-
tions on medicaid-not medicare
-programs of federally aided:

RECOMMENDEDFOR MATURE AUDIENCES Shown at 9:25 Only _ _
ALSO-SHOWN AT 11:10 ONLY
TONYRANDALL ' 0 '
SENTABERGER *
mEERTLOM
nWiFHYDEWTEIT*.
TERRY-THOM~S - 0 0 0 0
-PLUS- PLUS'
"RIDE A WHITE HORSE" "HIGHWAY RUNNERY"

Sundays and Cybele
as valid as DAVID
LISA.

and
and

-Jim, Peggy, and Doris

LUS p b
9NRL-jmld-
I rm

FRIDAY and
SATURDAY
Auditorium A
Angell Hall

7 and
9:15 P.M.

NATIONAL OFNERAL CORPORATION4
FOX EASTERN TFEATREFUEEUILT
FO VILn E
375 No. MAPLE RD.-769-1300
Newest - Most
Modern in Ann Arbor
Maple & Jackson Rd.

Fased on the exciting best-se Hr
Continuous showing 1.00

ACRES OF

50c

FREE PARKING

...o

E . ..... ..

........

rmm..OWA M

THISMOTION PICTURE REVEALS THE SHOCKING TRUTH
ABOUT THE EVENTS LEADING UP TO ONE OF THE MOSI

VIOLENI DAYS IN AMERICAN HISTORY!

a

NOW SHOWING

presents
ARSENIC
AND
OLD LACE
Starring
CARY GRANT
and
JOSEPHINE HULL

or "A Matter
fomer y
"La Vie
de au"oRosistaflee"
NICOLE STEPHANE Presents CATHERINE DENEUVE'" PIERRE BRASSEUR - PHILIPPE NOiRET . HENRI GARCIN
in JEAN-PAUL RAPPENEAUS "A MATTER OF RESISTANCE" with MARY MARQUET and CARLOS THOMPSON
"'GREAT HELD OVER FOR
"G RAT AMUSEMENT PURPOSES ONLY
FUN " W

They blamed him~
for the
Population
explosion!
serviced
Whole
V ,townt
PRESENTED BY ANGELO RIZZOLI
ANOUK AIMEE UGO TOGNAZZI GIOVANNA RALLI
wiH PIERRE BRASSEUR DIRECTED BY ALESSANDRO BLASETTI
SHOW TIMES: Mon. thru Thurs. 7-9

O 92
STARRING"+.
JASONf
8t
GEORGE
SEGALe

11 . ' X & -a -hjm -'

I

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan