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August 02, 1967 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1967-08-02

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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 2,1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WE1~NESDAY, AUGUST 2,1987 THE MICHIGAN flAILY

L C1 V Ad

Allies Push
Into Mekong
In Sweep
Called Biggest Effort
To Rout Guerrillas;
Envoys Go to Korea
By The Associated Press
The largest allied assault force
ever assembled in the Mekong
Delta are hunting guerrillas in the
swampy terrain southwest of
Saigon. Contact slackened after
heavy weekend fighting was set
off by guerrilla efforts to cut a
vital highway.
Perhaps 10,000 or more United
States and South Vietnamese
forces are engaged in the sweep-
called Coronado II - which was
launched in secrecy last Friday.
Estimates of the number of Viet
Cong dead from various sources
ranged from 150 to 350.
The U.S. command said 16
Americans were killed and 59
wounded. Unofficial reports from
the field said a similar number
of casualties had occurred among
the South Vietnamese troops.
Terrorist Toll
Officials reported that Viet
1k Cong terrorists killed 58 civilians,
wounded 39 and abducted 44 last
week. There was no official word
on how many civilians were killed
by allied forces fighting along
the. heavily traveled highway link-
ing My Tho, one of the largest
cities in the area, to Saigon, 45
miles away.
The road had been cut by guer-
rilla forces eight times in 10 days,
reducing the flow of rice and put-
ting economic pressure on ,the
capital.
In the political scene, the Sai-
gon government announced it has
invited 36 nations to send observ-
ers to see that the national elec-
tions are free and honest. United
Nations Secretary - General U
Thant last Thursday rejected
sending U.N. observers.
Lifts Censorship
The Saigon government has
partly lifted censorship of news-
papers' reportage of the campaign
which will elect a president, vice-
president and 60 members of the
Senate Sept. 3 and a 122 member
House of Representatives Oct. 22.
Talks in South Korea were next
on the agenda of Gen. Maxwell
Taylor and Clark Clifford, Presi-
dent Johnson's special envoys to
U.S. Asian allies. They talked five
hours with New Zealand govern-
ment heads who pledged contin-
ued resistance to communist
forces. President Marcos of the
Philippines has already declined
to meet with the envoys.
Foreign Minister Tran Van Do
took issue with Thant's statement
in a speech at Greensboro, N.C,
Sunday that the allied fight in
Vietnam is a war against a na-
tional independence movement,
n ot against Communist aggres-
sion. "Mr. ,Thant is perfectly
aware that South Vietnam is an
independent state which has been
internationally recognized as such
for many years," Do said in a
statement.
"The war of national independ-
ence which had been waged
against the. French ended, for all
practical purposes, in 1954.
"In 1959 the Communists start-
ed terrorist and sabotage activi-
ties all around the country.

NAMES STAFF HEAD: S'=W?.
Ask Senate Study DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETI
Hoover Tells Riot Commission
The Daily Official Bulletin is an Room of the Institute of Social
Rl official publication of the Univer- search Bldg.
Ci c saitay of Michigan for which The
Co s ia isNo n iae Michigan Daily assumes no edditrShe of Music Cncer - Ba
Co s ia ieaotndc td rI~4 LL L1~eonsbl ~oicsshould beTrio: RRackham Lecture al, 8:30

L-

WASHINGTON (R)--Chairmanj
Otto Kerner said yesterday the
presidential advisory commission
on civil disorders got word from
FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover that1
"there is no intelligence on which
to base a conclusion of conspira-1
cy" behind the wave of recent
city riots.
Hoover was one of the first wit-
nesses the commission heard when
it buckled down to the task as-
signed it by President Johnson of
determining what happened in the
riots, why it happened and how
future riots can be headed off.
Kerner, who will be, dividing
his time between chores of the
commision and those of being
governor of Illinois, said also that
he thinks the deadlines set by
President Johnson for reports
from the commission will be dif-
ficult to meet.
Johnson asked for a prelimi-
nary, interim report on, findings
by March 1 and a final report

with recommendations a year
from now.
The governor said Hoover had
clocked about 52 disturbances in
the last three years and it was
on the basis of experience with
them that he appeared before the
commission today and said he
found no indications of a con-
spiracy.
Kerner said in that connection
that; "I think all of us are im-
pressed by the fact . . . that some
of these things seem to start with
little incidents."
To head the commission staff
President Johnson tapped a 54-
year old Negro who is director of
the Illinois Department of Rev-
enue, Theodore A. Jones.
The appointment was made'
upon recommendation of David
Ginsburg, Washington lawyer who
was named yesterday as executive
director of the commission.
Thus the 11 member group, un-
der the chairmanship of Gov. Ot-

USrosBRomney Lifts Restrictions

to Kerner of Illinois, was swinging
into operation to lay the ground-
work for coming up with findings1
on what has actually happened in
cities scourged by riots, why they<
did happen, and what can bei
done to prevent them from recur-
ring,
The process today was largely;
one of getting some information
and advice from persons who have;
served on other investigating3
committees.
Ginsburg left the morning ses-
sion in the executive office build-;
ing across the street from the
White House to brief reporters.
He said the members got into
rules of procedure and matters of1
organizing and staff and then
heard as their first witness J. Lee
Rankin, former solicitor general,
of the United States and former
executive director of the Warren
Commission which investigated
the assassination of President
John F. Kennedy.
WASHINGTON (P-The epi-
demic of racial violence erupted
in the Nation's capital early yes-1
terday as young Negroes smashed
store windows, set several minor
fires and pelted police within a,
mile of the White House.
District of Columbia officials
termed the disorder a "relativelyr
minor street disturbance" and
praised police for their dispatch
and using the "minimum amount
of force necessary" to handle the,
trouble.t
Police said there was no shoot-
ing and little looting in the 2%/2-
hour rampage by an estimated1
200 youths which broke out while
police were moving several hun-
dred spectators away from anf
extra-alarm fire in a furniture
store in a largely Negro area.
Although ,nearby military in-
stallations were reportedly alertedi
in case the disturbance grew, po-
lice described the disorder as
vandalism rather than an out-
break of rioting in the capital.
Two-thirds of Washington's 750,-
000 residents are Negroes.

WASHINGTON (A)-The Senate
was urged yesterday to order a
special study of racial rioting and
put it under command of Sen.
John L. McClellan (D-Ark), who
directed the rackets investigations
of a decade ago.
McClellan, head of the perma-
nent investigations subcommittee
since 1954, would be authorized to
make a two-month, $150,000
study of the disorders under a
resolution adopted by the Senate
Rules Committee.
Declaring the job "should be
started today or tomorrow," Sen.
B. Everett Jordan (D-NC), chair-
man of the Rules Committee, said
the Senate "is determined to find
the causes and recommend a
remedy for this situation."
Jordan's committee recommend-
ed assigning the inquiry to Mc-
Clellan's investigators after re-
jecting, as too time-consuming,
a proposal by Sen. Edward W.
Brooke (R-Mass) that a special
Senate-House committee be set
up.
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only, Forms are available,
in Room 1011 SAB.
* * *
Far Eastern Language Institute spon-
sors a lecture by Prof. Kun Chang of
the University of California. He will
speak on "The Phonological system
of the Chinese Language during the
Sui-Tang Period," on Aug. 2 begin-
ning at 7:30 p.m. In Rm. 102-103 of
the Michigan Union.
Deutscher Verein will sponsor kaffee-
stunde: kaffee, kuchen, konversation,
on Wed., Aug. 2. 3-5 p.m., 3050 Frieze
Bldg.
Christian Science Organization holds
a weekly testimony meetin gthis Thurs.
at 7:30-8:30 p.m. at 3545 SAB.
* * w
Univ.. of Michigan Rifle Club holds
open shooting with .22 calibre rifles and
pistols on this Wed., at 7-9 p.m. on the
ROTC Rifle Range. Rifles furnished;
ammunition available at a reduced
price.

McClellan's group would be in-
structed to file a preliminary re-
port by Oct. 2 and a final report
by next Jan. 31.
The action came amid these
other developments:
-Atty. Gen. Ramsey Clark said
he "never detected anything but
cordiality" in his talks with Gov.
George Romney of Michigan, who
has accused President Johnson of
playing politics in the dispatch of
troops to quell Detroit's racial
rioting.
-Clark told a Senate Judiciary
subcommittee hearing on John-
son's civil rights bill that violence
and rioting have become the
greatest barriers to fulfillment of
civil rights in America.
-The Senate Judiciary Com-
mittee announced police officials
from cities hit by racial violence
will be initial witnesses when
hearings open today on a House-
passed antiriot bill.
The hearings on this bill, which
would make it a federal crime to
cross state lines with the aim of
inciting a riot, could develop into
a separate investigation of the
street violence that has erulited in
a number of American cities this
summer.
Clark told the Senate civil rights
bill hearing that the rioting "must
and will be stopped."
While asserting this is a time of
adversity for civil rights, Clark
urged approval of the 1967 civil
rights measure which includes an
open housing provision.

DETROIT (P) -Federal troops
began leaving riot scarred Detroit
yesterday as silently as they came.
Huge C-130 transport planes
rumbled off the runways of Sel-
fridge Air Force Base, 20 miles
northeast of the nation's fifth
largest city. By the dozens, they
carried 2,000 hardened troops
away from fire-blackened scenes
of destruction where 41 persons.
were killed and more than 1,000
were injured.
Saw No ,Action'
Yet most members of the 101st
and 82nd Airborne divisions never
"saw action" against snipers or
looters. The 5,000 troops were or-
dered into Detroit by President
Johnson late July 24 and arrived
by plane and bus in morning
darkness a week ago.
By then "the riot was entering
its third day and some areas of
sporadic gunfire and heavy burn-
ing, and looting were slowly being
brought under control by 7,000
Michigan National Guardsmen
and upwards of 6,000 policemen.
Mainly, the troops were put on
patrol or standby duty, posing an
omnious threat against any wide-
spread renewal of violence.
First to leave today were four
battalions of the 101st. They were

returned to their home base, Ft.
Campbell, Ky.
Three battalions of the 82nd
1,500 men, were transported quiet-
ly by buses from Detroit to Sel-
fridge yesterday, said C y r u s
Vance, special assistant to De-
'fense Secretary Robert McNa-
mara. No timetable was disclosed
for their return to Ft. Bragg, N.C.
Vance called the action a
"phased withdrawal- of regular
Army troops." An Army spokes-
man said 1,200 would remain for
a time in Detroit.
The troops were sent in by the
federal government after Mich-
igan Gov. George Romney and
Detroit Mayor Jerome Cavanagh
made the request.
Lifts Restrictions
As quiet settled upon the city-
police noted fewer reports of
crime logged than usual - Gov.
Romney lifted nearly all emer-
gency restrictions yesterday.
He abolished the temporary
curfew and said groups may as-
semble freely. He lifted gasoline
sale restrictions. But he continued
e m e r g e n c y bans indefinitely
against sale of weapons and ex-
plosives. Romney on Monday end-
ed the emergency prohibition
against sale of beer, wine and
liquor.

_
irr

=wwZ I

--
LOOK FOR A SKY OF BLUE ..
" ' " ."* . t* i -
Na WEEK ONLY
ONE WEEK ONLY!

DIAL 8-6416
ENDS TONIGHT
2 Exceptional Films!
ROMAN POLANSKI'S
"An Absolute Knockout ..
Of A Movie!
-BosieyCrowther.New York Times
A ROYAL FILMS INTERNATIONAL PRESENTATION
*and '
WILLIAM
WYLERS
th collactor
* Thursday '
"GAY SLAPSTICK
COMEDY!"
-Time Magazine
CATHERINE DENEUVE in
"A M ottrof Resistance
A ROYAL FILMS INTERNATIONAL Release

"GREAT

Wednesday-Sunday

August 9-13

LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
Don't Wait Until the Last Minute!
Get Your Tickets Now!
BOX OFFICE OPEN DAILY-12:30-5 P.M.
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS, DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH

L

ROBERT AME CHARLES MILDRED
REDFORD- NDA-BOYER- ATWICK

CINEMA II
presents
ROBERT ROSSEN'S
LILITH
(1965)
"One of the most haunt-
ingly beautiful films in
years. As impressive as
Sundays and Cybele and
as valid 'as DAVID and
LI SA.
-Jim, Peggy, and Doris
FRIDAY and 7 and
SATURDAY 9:15 P.M.
Auditorium A
Angell Hall 50c

SHOWS AT
1, 3, 5,.
7, 9:05 P.M.

,.MICHIGAN

Mats. $1.25
Eves. &
Sundays $1.50

HELD OVER
4th & Final
Week

......
.
I
i
4
i
y
t

....

Phone 434-0130
EAa4 0* CARPENTER RUAD

The Area's Finest Drive-in is easy
to reach - 2 miles south of
Washtenaw Rd. on Carpenter.
BOX OFFICE
OPEN 8:00 P.M.

STARTS THURSDAY

"In the tradition
of 'Dear John'
makes 'Dear John'
look like a fairy

FIR
RU.

RST'
UN

NOW SHOWING

F 1 RST
RUN

They blamed him-
for the
Population
explosion!

- I I Iflfiwq Wlff

I

RECOMMENDED fIR MATURE ADIENCES Shown at 9:25 Only Q
ALSO-SHOWN AT 11:10 ONLY

t oY rRATN DA E
SENABERGER v I
IIERBELOM {"
WIFRIDHYDEWH~ITE -
TERRY.THOMAS
PLUS-
"RIDE A WHITE HORSE"

0
0
0
0
0
s.," -- , 00000000 0
PLUS
"HIGHWAY RUNNERY"

serviced
the
whole
town t,
O8AE NAPLA BYPIRA NU
PRESENTED BY ANGELO RIZZOLI
ANOUK AIMEE UGO TOGNAZZI GIOVANNA RALLI
WITH PIERRE BRASSEUR DIRECTED BY ALESSANDRO BLASETI

tale. Would you
believe 'Virginia
Woolf' looking
like a Sunday
go-to-meetin?"
-World Journal Tribune
",a man.. enjoyed!t~
1l, A Woman"
SHOW TIMES:
Mon. thru Thurs. 7-9
Sat. 7-8-1 1; Sun. 6-8-10
STARTS THURSDAY
VERY HANDY MAN
with
ANOUK AIMEE
GIOVANNA RAZZI
T T u.

I

RESCHEDULED AUGUST 3, 4, & 5

I'

the emu summer theatre
production of

I *I a

I

I

I

i

SHOW TIMES:

J

Mon thruThurs.7-9

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