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May 09, 1967 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1967-05-09

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PTwO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAYMAY 9, 1967

FILMS Kennedy Avoids Recei
superior Quality of 'La Dolce Vita' Survives Over Johnson's War P

tt Clash
'olicies

)espite Severe Deletion of Important Scenes

By ANDREW LUGG
Italian Cinema has produced
two "golden ages." The first, in
the forties, started with Rossel-
lini's "Open City" and culminated
with Visconti's "La Terra Trema."
And the second, beginning in 1959
with Antgnionis "L'Avventura"
and in 1960 with Fellini's "La
Dolce Vita," still goes on.
Fellini has played a major part
in this latter upsurge of high qual-
ity films. Thus, the Vth Forum's
revival of "La Dolca Vita," not
only reiterates this cinema's avow-
ed intent: the showing of "art-
films," which is always praise-
worthy, but is also useful for a re-
appraisal of Fellini's work.
Before discussing this further,

however, a strong reservation con-
cerning the version shown, must
be lodged. The film has been cut
by some fifteen to twenty min-
utes with the result that three im-
portant scenes have been omitted:
one where the central character,
Marcello, (Mastroianni) is reas-
sured by a friend of his that he
can write and is not just another
"cheap" journalist; a later se-
quence, in which Marcello learns
that his friend has killed himself,
along with his two children; and
finally a very long scene in which
he and Emma (a woman hyster-
ically in love with him) go to the
site of a supposed vision of the
Virgin Mary.
These cuts -are extremely im-

portant to the film, since they are
an integral part in Marcello's
movement from some sort of hope
in "salvation," paradise to his
complete disillusionment. At this
point, he is half-dead, and as many
writers have noted he knows that
he has been confined to the in-
ferno. The first of the two events
which were cut gives him hope,
but then dashes it to the ground-
intellect, even, could not keep his
friend alive. The second cut scene
shows, as people get crushed under
foot when rushing to get a glimpse
of the two children who claim to
have had the vision, that religion
also is of no help. In addition it
establishes reasons for his later
rejection of Emma.

Such cutting is inexcusable, es-
pecially since the posters claimed'
that this version was uncut and
uncensored. But, do not think that
the cinema is to blame. This isa
just another incident of the dis-
honesty of distributors.
Purists wil further object to the
dubbing. However, this is not a;
print that I will push, because it
was done reasonably carefully and
Italian films, anyway, are almost
all post-synchronized. Very rarely
do we hear the actual voice of the;
actor or actress. Mastroianni dubs
himself, but Fellini very regularly1
uses other voices than those of his
actors.
On the credit side, we for once
see the film in full size cinerma-
scope, an event no Film Society in
this town can achieve. The spec-
tacle of "La Dolce Vita" demands
this sort of monumentality. In-
deed, aside from Godard's brief1
excursion into scope, I can think
of nobody who has used the wide-
screen to better effect than Fel-
lini does here., .
Two examples are- the arrival of
Sylvie, a top-heavy American
movie-star (Anita Ekberg's finest
role), at Rome airport (surely such
an onslaught by photographers,
reporters and Ekberg's breasts
could not be limited to the regular
screen size?) and Maddalena, an
heiress, and Marcello going into a
prostitute's house to make love.,
Here Fellini manages to give the
event the refinement that it de-

serves. The small screen would
have made it 1 o o k "terribly
squalid."
In a phrase the filming is mag-
nificent.
Now getting back to my opening
remarks, I can assert that Fellini's
contribution to this new "golden
age" lies in the manner in which
he has developed a cinematic lan-
guage to present what is a very
personal vision. In "La Dolce Vita"
he shows the inferno into which
a society can force the individual.
He extends' the language in "812"
to illustrate the inferno within an
individual.
Space restrictions prevent a
thorough going discussion of the
plot. Let it be said, nevertheless,
that this proceeds discontinuously,
the "tableaus" presented having
more to do with "states of being"
than with chronology. The film,
however, has a unity which com-
pletely and ruthlessly lays bare
Marcellp's torment; from his tacit
rejection to final acceptance of:
"life here is hell."

By JACK BELL
Associated Press News Analyst
WASHINGTON-Sen. Robert F.
Kennedy (D-NY) has retired tem-
porarily to the side lines while
other critics continue to snipe at
President Johnson's Vietnam war
policies.
Kennedy deliberately avoided
any involvement in the most re-
cent clash over a Senate Republi-
can Policy Committee report
sharply critical of Johnson's con-
duct of the war and what it called
the administration's failure to
push for peace negotiations.
While Sen. J. W. Fulbright (D-
Ark.) chairman of the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee and
a fellow critic, praised the GOP
report, the New York senator
fended off questions. He declined,
for example, to comment on the
assertion of Sen. George D. Aiken
(R-Vt.) that the Johnson admin-
istration has so boxed itself in
that Aiken doubts it ever can
make an honorable peace.
Clash'
Since his bitter Feb. 6 clash
with Johnson at the White House
after his return from a tour of
European capitals, Kennedy has
made only one major speech on
policy.

He proposed in the Senate on
March 2 that bombing of North
Vietnam be halted as a step to-
ward peace negotiations, an idea
that the White House and State
Department rejected.
Subsequently Kennedy avoidedl
the Vietnam subject in an April
22 talk to the Amercian Society
of Newspaper Editors and has
kept away from it in his rate
Senate speeches.
If this is a "new" Kennedy,
associates think his stance is in-
duced by several considerations.
First among these is his declared
intention of campaigning actively
for the expected Johnson-Hum-
phrey ticket in 1968.
Kennedy obviously doesn't want
to widen his public differences
with Johnson to the point where
it would be any more embarrassing
for them to campaign together
than it already is.

! Behind Kennedy's new silence
there is also the bleak acceptancek
of the fact that almost anything
he says about foreign policy will
meet automatic resistance from
the administration.
Kennedy is not about to change
his mind on Vietnam. His private
opinion is that Johnson may be*
on a collision course with Red
China in what he regards as the
President's determination to win
a clearcut military victory over
North Vietnam.
The New York senator feels that
further escalation is invitable. He
is deeply disturbed about this but
at the mpment knows nothing
effective he can do about it.
In domestic issues, however,
Kennedy is not keeping quiet. He
criticized yesterday welfare and
antipoverty programs at all levels
of government, urging a "virtual
revolution" in all social services.

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DIAL NO 2-6264;

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

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HELD OVER
2nd WEEK

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....

"Who Am I? A Christian Perspective." I profit field desired. Applications at Bu-
Everybody welcome. reau.
Consultants to Mgmt., N.Y.C. - Head
Foreign s ors of program for census and attitude
Visiors urvey for Catholic organization. Bkgd.
The following foreign visitors can be in social science or bus. ad. Minimum
reached through the Foreign Visitor. requirement BA and 8-10 yrs. respons.
Programs Office, 764-2148. exper. In one of these: Program mgmt.,
Abdul Aziz Jibrill, minister of an- educ. admin.. design and execution of
tiquities, classical archeological, Libya, soc. sci. studies in Indust, or non-
May 9-10. Indust. environment, census and dem-
Roderick MacLean, director of TV, ographic studies, Indust. admin. rela-
University of Glasgow, Scotland, May tions to utilization of data processing
11-13. services.
Dilip Mukerjee, assistant editor, The Mead Johnson & Co., Evansville, Ind.
Statesman, Calcutta, India, May 11-14. -Scientific and Regulatory Affairs As-
Nafis Ahmed, geography, East Paki- sociate, BS in nursing, min. 3 yrs, in
stan, May 11-14, physician's office or clinic. In experi-
Dr Vojislav Stanovic, editor monthly mental therapeutics technical informa-
review, "Boajalizani," Yugoslavia, May tion department.
13-16. Personnel Dept. of Genesee County,
Mrs. Mira Stanovic, Town Planning Flint, Mici.-BSCE, prefer exper, in
Bureau, Yugoslavia, May 13-16.' construction work underground. Reg-
Mladen Kovacevic, accompanied by istration in Mich desirable, not neces-
Mrs. Kovacevic,, economics, Yugoslavia, sary.
May 13-:6. yCosmos Broadcasting Corp., WTOL-TV,
R. V. S. Murthy, India, May 14-21. Toledo, Ohio-Interested in anyone In
radio, TV, journalism, with aptitude in
"tTV news.

ji!I9ilmi;V

ENDS THURS.
Dial 5-6290

Shows at
1, 3, 5, 7
and 9 P.M.

PAULNEWMAN
FREDRIC MARCH RICHARD8 OONE
DIANE CILENTO
IBR1x
t w*~ COLORBy Deluxe::;

Ss *
1:30
4:05
6:20
9:00

TUESDAY, MAY 9

Day Calendar
Institute of Science and Technology
eminar -"Horizons in Manufacturing
echnology-1967": Registration, Rack-
am Bldg., 3 to 8:30 a.m.
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
nar-"The Management, of Managers":
0 Business Administration, 8:15 am.,
o 5 p.m., and 7 to 9 p.m.
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
nar - "Improving . Technical Writing
k11l": Michigan Union, 8:30 a.m. to
:15 P.M.
Bureau- of 'ndustrial Relations Sem-
nar-."Introduction to EDP and the
ersonnel Function": Third Flnor Con-
rence \Room, Michigan Union, 8:30
.m to 3:25 p.m
)RGAN IZA TION

THE EASTERN MICHIGAN
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS
presents
Sheridan's
comedy 7
of manners.
TheRIVALS
MAY 10-15
Seats $1.50. Res., HU 2-3453
Curtain 8 p.m.; Sun. Mat. 2 p.m.

I

L ttuuI-N4ZIE,

NOTICES

ANNOUNCEMENTS: For further information please call
U.S. Army Tank Automotive Center, 764-7460, General Division, Bureau of
Warren, Mich.-Will give an additional Appointments, 3200 SAB.
FSEE (Federal Service Entrance Exam) ----------.s.y-----i
given for Bus Ad., Econ., Education, Phone 434-0130
Poll. Sci. and' Math majors interested
in working at the Center. Contact the
Bureau, General Division, 764-7460, if
interested.
Peace Corps Examinations-Regular- -
ly given on third Sat., May 20, at 1 Ire on CARPENTER ROAD
p.m. at downtown branch of Post Of' OPEN 6:30 P.M
fice, Main at Catherine Sts. Completed NOW SHOWING
applications should be brought to the
test center, available at the Bureau.
POSITION OPENINGS: E
Statistical Tabulating Corp., Chicago,
Ill-Nation's largest independent serv-
ice bureau offers openings for Srs.
and recent grads in data processing
field, application materials at Bureau.
Mgmt. Consultants, Chicago, Ill. - Shown at 7:45 & 11:15
I,argest number of openings for per-
sonnel experienced in international
field, and with language trng. in Span,,
Portuguese, French and German. Open-
ings for pharmacology grad as techni-
cal liaison and export salesman forI
bulk chem., Span. req., several tripsI
per year abroad. Also for export salesLp
correspondents, acctg., engrs. in sales,
mktg., financial and admin. positions. Shown at 9:30 Only
Northrop Carolina, Inc., Asheville, N.C.
-Facilities Engr,, Maintenance Supv., /IR e
Process,, Instrumentation, Test-solid
propellant, applications, propulsion, Sr
Tech. Writer, Master Scheduler, Design.,tICOLner ummw uw
Chemist, Proposal Mgr., Ballistician. De- i
tails on positions at Bureau. PLUS-
United Community Services of Grand "SKI BOOM"-In Color
Rapids and Kent City, Inc. - Public
Relations Director, degree with speciali- COLOR CARTOON
zation in public relations, journ. or re-
lated areas, 5 yrs. min, exper. in P.R.
or publicity Work, application to non-

Its star-strong AcQdemy Award cost delivers perform-
ances of remarkable strength. Taut, keen direction by
Martin Ritt hones the suspense razor sharp.
STARTING FRIDAY, MAY 12th
"SOUND OF MUSIC"

SEE THENE JAMESBONDMOVIE!
PETER SELLERS * URSULA ANDRESS
DAVID NIVEN T WOODY ALLEN
JIIAIN'INA noaETAOIN noaETAO
JOANNA PETTET *ONORSONWELLES
DALIAH LAVI 0 DEBORAH KERR
WILLIAM HOLDEN . CHARLES BOYER
- eJEAN-PAUL BELMONDO
GEORGE RAFT * JOHN HUSTON
S Mt Terence COOPER * Barbara BOUCHET

j

...

!,

SE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NCEMENTS is available to officially
gnized and registered student or-
uations only. Forms are available in
m 1011 BAB.
* * *
utscher Verein, Kaffeestunde: kaf-
kuchen, konversation, Wed., May
-5 p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg.
* * *
rice-Students for a Democratic So-
y (SDS), General membership meet-
(open to anyone), Tues., May 9,
-11 p.m., Room 3R-S, Union. Agen-
1. Nomination of officers. 2. Sum-
project proposals. 3. Fund-raising,
D8 National Convention, Antioch,
e 25-July 1. 5. Discussion.
* * * '
ichigan Christian Fellowship, Lec-,
--discussion, May 9, 7:30 p.m.,
on 3rd floor. Dr. Gordon Van Wylen,
n of thq College of Engineering:,

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