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July 25, 1967 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1967-07-25

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TUESDAY, JULY 25,1967

TRF. Mif'.UTC A N 11 ti Tr:v

," A,&*.&

TUEDAY JUY 2,l167T VA M >11iEl 1I1 lbA ZN Y

PAGE TA

Johnson Delays

Sending

"T" AvFEDERAL PANEL:

Increases In

Guarantees of Tenant Rights
Could End Violence in Slums

ederal roo s Int t All Sectors
Feli pTaylor, Clifford
In Saigon on Toi

stop

DETROIT (A')-Federal officials
said last night they had decided
not to use, nearly 5000 regular Ar-
my troops to quell Detroit's riot
problems unless the situation
worsens. Mayor Jerome P. Cavan-
agh said he thought it was a bad
decision.
"I certainly see some hopeful
signs," the mayor told a news con-
ference. "But Ifstill share the con-
viction that I would like to see
the commitment of federal troops
at this time."
Cyrus Vance, special assistant
to Defense Secretary Robert S.
McNamara, announced at the
same news conference that the
federal troops were being kept on
standby.
He said, however, "we will con-
tinue to follow this on an hourly
basis throughout the night," and
pledged to act as developments
require. He declined to say what
developments would make use of
federal troops necessary. ,
Johnson had announced dis-
patch of the troops less than two
hours after Gov. George Romney
and Mayor Jerome P. Cavanagh
had wired a plea for help.
Units of the 82nd and 101st Air-
borne Divisions were airlifted to
Selfrldg Air Force Base about 20
% miles north of downtown Detroit,
after Republican Gov. Romney of
Michigan said:
"Without help the situation
could become uncontrollable."
Federal troops never have been
used to quell Negro uprisings. But

paratroopers of the 101st were us-
ed against white segregationists
during the Little Rock, Ark., school
rioting of 1957.
The White House granted the
Romney request, in a telegram,
after conferences Johnson. held
with Atty. Gen. Ramsey Clark,
Secretary of Defense Robert S.
McNamara and Warren Chris-
topher, deputy- attorney general.
Christopher was directed to fly
to Detroit with Vance.
They were to determine the
situation and whether to send the
troops into the, smoke shrouded,
debris littered city.
I The regular troops would have
joined more than 7,000 Michigan
National Guardsmen, city and sub-
urban police, and state police
troopers who have braved sniper
fire, fire bombs and missiles in;
trying to halt the violence.
In. announcing his plea for fed-
eral help, Romney told news men
experience had shown that the
second night of racial violence
"usually was worse than the first."
Republican party leaders said
yesterday the United States is
"rapidly approaching a state of
anarchy" and that President
Johnson has failed to recognize
and deal with the intense problem
of racial violence in the cities.
They said violence like 1that
raging in Detroit may be the re-
sults of a conspiracy - organized
planning and execution on a na-
tional scale.''
They demanded an emergency

congressional investigation of "the'
planning, organization, method of
operation and means to bring an
end to rioting and civil disorder."
The statement was adopted un-
animously by the Republican Co-
ordinating Committee. Former
President Dwight D. Eisenhower
was among the party leaders who
voted for the declaration.
The legal basis for sending fed-
eral troops to the aid of state govs
ernments has been on the books
since 1795.

It says the President may, at the
request of a state legislature or its
governor if the legislature cannot
be convened, call in the armed
forces "whenever there is an insur-
rection in any state against the
government."
Romney's request gave the Pres-
ident the option of directing reg-
uilar Army troops to the scene,
federalizing Michigan National
3uard units already there so that
the Army commander would be in
charge of all military actions.

Residents Critical of
Police Force Tactics

DETROIT (A') - The Negroes
who live near 12th Street hate
what their own people have done
to the neighborhood, but they
hate the police even more.
They claim the police showed
uk too late with too little, dealt
brutally with those arrested and
failed to help the sick and
wounded.
But when a group of residents
gathered yesterday at the corner
of 12th and Taylor, one block
from the illegal after-hours sa-
loon where a Sunday morning
raid touched off mass violence,
they spoke of the looting and
store-smashing with revulsion.

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Johnny Le Duece, 26, said it
reminded 'him of Vietnam where
he served with an Air Force res-
cue team until seven months ago.
"We'd go to the small villages
that had been bombed," he said.
"People would go through the
garbage looking for food. This
reminds me of that - and it's
sickening."
"What did they accomplish?
"If the police had gotten here
right when it started, it wouldn't
have gotten so bad," said a slim
girl in yellow. "The police didn't
come until nine o'clock that
morning. Six hours after the vio-
lence began. By then it was too
late."
"With daylight, we thought
that'd bring a little quiet," she
added. "But 'with dawn, people
just got more bold. They'd been
shaking their heads - but about
five or six o'clock, they just de-
cided, 'Mgiht as well get us some,
too.' '
"You know, they keep saying
'Turn the other cheek,'" said an-,
other man, "but after a while
you start running out of cheeks."
At about that point, a car full
of blue-helmeted state policemen
drove past. One man in back was
poking a riot gun out of the win-
dow.
"You'd better watch out," the
policeman snarled. "It's loaded."
"Now, was that necessary?"
Johnson asked as the others on
the corner shouted indignantly
after the retreating car.
--

Of Strategy Talks
SAIGON (M)-Allied commands
reported stepped up activity on
both sides in the Vietnam war yes-
terday all thenway from the de-
militarized zone to the Mekong
Delta. While no major clashes
were reported, signs pointed to in-
creased fighting, road mining and
terrorism.
At the same time, two top en-
voys of President Johnson con-
ferred in Saigon, apparently to
pave the way for the leaders of the
nations fighting the Communists.
Gen. Maxwell D. Taylor and
Clark Clifford made Saigon first
stop of their tour o the allied na-
tions, amid speculation they would
be pressing those governments to
increase their manpower in Viet-
nam.
The U.S. Command reported no
major clashes since troops of the
U.S. 4th Infantry Division wiped{
out a North Vietnamese company
in a fierce 41/2 hour fight in the
central highlands near the Cam-
bodian border Sunday.
South Viet Patrols
South Vietnamese headquarters
disclosed that government troops
again were patrolling the southern'
half of the demilitarized zone di-.
viding South Vietnam and North
Vietnam. Spokesmen said 25 North7
Vietnamese troops had been killed
in one engagembent in that area
Sunday.
U.S. Marines and South Viet-
namese troops had swept into the
zone in mid May -in an effort to
clean out North Vietnamese units1
and gun positions. They pulled out+
after a few days, and Americanr
forces have gone back into the
zone only once since then for a+
brief period.
The South Vietnamese spokes-
man indicated that government
troops, at least, would now make+
zone patrols part of their routine.a
Guerrillas Busy
Elsewhere, ground fighting was
light and scattered in the normal
pattern of the war, but guerrilla
bands were busy.
The main highway from Saigonf
south into the delta was mined#
again, and Communist mortarmen1
laid down an accuratebarrage,
early in the day on a field hospital
at a brigade headquarters of the
U.S. 9th Infantry Division, about
45 miles southwest of the capital.

World News Roundup

By The Associated Press
BEIRUT, Lebanon () - Presi-
dent Gamal Abdel Nasser has
sounded a call for a long, slow
struggle against Israel, with only
one faint note for a peaceful
settlement.
Most of the Arab press and
radio in the Middle East empha-
dsize the need for unrelenting con-
flict with Israel in the Egyptian
president's speech Sunday calling
for belt tightening for a "long
difficult road."
. '.
BUCHAREST, Romania -Ro-
mania served notice to the Krem-
lin yesterday that it will hew to
its independent course despite
Soviet pressure to abandon its
doctrine of national Communism.
Nicolae Ceausescu, the nation's
Communist party chief, spelled out
the doctrine in a foreign policy
declaration that sounded like an
invitation to other East European
regimes to follow the Romanian
example.
* * *
THREE RIVERS, Que.-Presi-
dent Charles de Gaulle carried his
message of French Canadian sepa-
ration into rural Quebec yesterday,
whistle-stdpping through thun-
derstorms and humid weather like
a candidate running for elections.
The Quebec government had
made efforts to drum up popular
enthusiasm for De Gaulle's pass-
age and there were predictions
that great masses wouldline the
highway and congretate in the
towns. But, the turnouts did not
measure up to the forecasts.'

SACRAMENTO, Calif. - Gov.
Ronald Reagan and former Vice
President Richard M. Nixon say
they made no deals at a "summit"
they held Sunday, but agreed the
Republican party must nominatej
a candidate who can beat Presi-'
dent Johnson next year.
It was the first meeting of the
two since Reagan's stock as a po-
tential candidate began rising.
Nixon jokingly referred to the
weekend as "the summit of Bohe-
mia."
* * *
FLAT ROCK, N.C.-Carl Sand-
burg, who rose through the ranks
of working men to achieve a deli-
cate and humane touch in the
literary world, died Saturday at
age 89, was cremated yesterday at
St. John's in the Wilderness Epis-
copal Church, near Connemara.

WASHINGTON A')-A federal
panel suggested yesterday that
greater rights for tenants-includ-
ing possible withholding of rent-
might help clean up the nation's
slum housing and eliminate at
least one cause of vandalism and
rioting.
The panel reported that present.
laws governing private property
date from feudal England, are
heavily weighted in the landlord's
favor and hinder efforts at slum
rehabilitation. It concluded also
that the courts usually take the
landlord's side and the complain-

ing tenant winds up being evicted.
The findings are outlined in a
40-page report on a conference
held last December and sponsored
by the Department of Housing and
Urban Development, the Justice
Department and the Office of
Economic Opportunity.
The report notes that no votes
were taken and the suggestions
should not be considered as ex-
pressing the views of the conferees
in general or of the sponsoring
federal agencies.
But Asst. Atty. Gen. Frank
Wozencraft, who headed the group

that prepared the report, said a
news briefing that a "general ca
sensus seemed to emerge" from
panelists. He said most of the
forms listed would have to be ma
at the state and local leyel,
though the federal governmn
could be a strong participant.
Robert C. Wood, undersecret
of Housing and Urban Develc
ment, said at the briefings
department already is using
financial leverage- to try to p
suade municipalities to make sc
improvements in slum housing.
said some federal aid has been e
nied communities that make lit
or no effort.
Wood's department expects
have ready by Sept. 2 tighi
standards w h i c h communit
mustmeet to qualify for feds
grants for public housing andt
ban redevelopment.
Suggestions
Among the panel's suggestio
for giving tenants greater rig
are:
-Permit tenants to pa3f rent
a court in cases where serious A
lations of building codes exist.
--Suspend entirely tenants' co
gations to pay rent "if serious 'v
lations are permitted to contin
for an extended period."
-Allow the tenant to sue t
landlord-and collect damages-
case of willful disregard of bul
ing maintenance-unless the to
ant also is at fault.
-Give tenants, acting as
group, the right to have th
building placed in the hands of
court-appointed receiver.
I.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
oftieial publication of the Univer-
sity of }Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m.' Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
student organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
information call 764-9270.
TUESDAY, JULY 25
Day Calendar
Dept. of Gerontology Conference -
"Twentieth Annual Conference on Ag-
ing": Physics Astronomy Bldg., 8:30 a.m..
Audio-visual Education Center Film
Preview-"Blindness, Every Second Car"
and "Time of the Horn": Multipurpose
Room, Undergraduate Library, 1:30 p.m.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
USE OF' THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only, Forms are available
in Room lo11 SAB.
*, * *
Michigan Christian Fellowship will
hold a. lecture discussion at 7:30 p.m.
in the Michigan Union Rm. 3-G. The
speaker, Arthur' Funkhouser, will speak
on "Christ and the Hippies."
Deutscher Verein will sponsor kaffee-
stunde: kaffee, kuchen, konversation,
on Wed., July 26, 3-5 p.m.,. 3050 Frieze
Bldg.
* * *
Far Eastern Language Program spon-
sors a lecture on "Chinese Poetics: Reg-
ulated Verse of the Tang Dynasty" with
Prof. Hugh M. Stimson, from Yale
University, as speaker. The event will
be in Angell Hall on July 25 at 7:30
p*m '
Far Eastern Language Institute pre-
sents Prof. Richard T. Thompson, of
Georgetown University, who will speak
on "Chinese Lexotactics: From Clause
to Sentence" at 7:30 p.m.,, July 26 in
Room 25 of the Michigan Union.

Linguistic Institute Forum Lecture-
Prof. Einar Haugen, Harvard University,
"The Rise of Standard Languages in
Scandinavia": Rackham Lecture Hall,
7:30 p.m.
General Notices
Dept. of English Lecture: Prof. R. M
Ohmann, Wesleyan University, will lec-
ture on "Syntax and Style," Aud. C,
Angell Hall, on Wed., July 26, at 4:10
p.m. All interested persons are invited
to attend.
Dept. of Political Science/Center for
Russian and East European Studies:
Are co-sponsoring a lecture by Dr. Jerzy
Wiatr, of the Institute of Philosophy
and. Sociology, Polish Academy of Sci-
ences, entitled "Local Politicsas an In-
strument of Socio-Economic Develop-
ment" in the Sixth Floor Conference
Rbom, Institute of Social Research
Bldg., 4:10 p.m,, Wed., July 26.
Center for Japanese Studies: In coop-
eration with the CIC Summer Asian
Languages Institute present Prof. Wil-
liam P. Malm, professor of music at the
University of Michigan, giving a public
lecture entitled "Left-Wing Music of
East Asia," Aud. A, Angell Hall, 8:30
p.m., Wed., July 26.
Doctoral Examination for Allen Ed-
ward Blaurock, Physics; thesis: "X-Ray
Diffraction Studies of the Myelin
Sheath of Nerve," Wed., July 26, Room
629 Physics-Astronomy Bldg,, at 3
p.m. Chairman, C. R. Worthington.
Foreign'V isitors
The following foreign visitors can be
reached through the Foreign Visitor
Programs Office, 764-2148.%
Mr. Nair, professor of accounting,
University of Nigeria, Nigeria, July 26-
29.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
Mobil Chemical Co., Plastics Division,
Macedon, New York 14502-Manager-
Compensation and Benefits. 5-10 yrs.
exper. in personnel field, with 3 in
this specialization.
Rockwell-Standard, Pittsburgh, Pa.
15222-Supervisor-Mktg. Info. Services.
To set up info., center at corp. hdgrts.
M.A.L.S. or equiv. trng. In info. han-
dling methods and several yrs. exper.
in mktg. res. library or tech, library.
G. D. Searle & Co., Chicago, Ill. 60680
-Chem. Research Div. has position
available for recent grad with BS in
organic chem. and interest in bio-

chem. Work to consist of biochem.
prep. at pilot plant stage of develop-
ment. Can continue tech. education
Ingalls Shipbuilding Corp., Pascagou-
la, Miss. 39567-Openings for engrs.,
naval architects, auditors, accountants,
finan, analysts, systems analysts, pro-
grammers, and draftsmen."Spec, Infor-
mation available at Bureau.

For further information
764-7460, General Division,
Appointments, 3200 SAB.

please call
Bureau of

TEACHER PLACEMENT:
The following schools have listed
vacancies for Sept., 1967:
Grass Lake, Mich. - Elementary,
Grades 2,and 6.
Imlay City, Mich.-Elem., J., Math,
H.S. Math. H.S. Biology/Math.
Napoleon, Mich.-Commercial.
Newberry, Mich.-H.S. Chem./Math,
Elmwood Park, 11. - Earth Science!
(Coaching if desired).
Artesia, New Mexico-J.H. Choir (7-8-
9th grades). Will consider someone of
retirement age.
For additional information contact
Education Division, Bureau of Appoint-j
ments, 3200 SAB, 764-7462.

. ENDS WEDNESDAY .

CINEMA II

HELD OVER
3rd WEEK
"In the tradition
of 'Dear John'
makes Dear John'
look like a fairy
tale. Would you
believe 'Virginia
Woolf' looking
like a Sunday
go-to-meetin?"
-World Journal Tribune
aI a . . , enjoyed!"
1I A Womn"
Show Times:
Mon. thru Thurs. 7-9

Dial 8-64#16
ENDING WEDNESDAY
Whenever
they talk
about
great
suspense
motionh
pictures, ,
they always seem
to mention.
DIABGLIQUEU

AND

PRESENTS

TO DIE

1

Phone 434-0130
n E r t r vc e 0 4 C A AP fN T E l I R D A I I
FIRST OPEN 8:00 P.M. FIRST
RUN NOW SHOWING RUN

r

IN

Seven Arts Produchopresents
Robert Dhru
r111Fl

A Guide For the Married Man
By America's Most famous Swiogers
SOR<;i

MADID

Snown at 9:3a Only
Also Shown at 11:35 Only,
PLUS-"RODEO DAREDEVILS"
COLOR CARTOON

The Do's And Don'ts For The Married WI
Man Who's Thinking Single - or
The Single Man Who's
Just Thinking!
WAITER MATTHAU - ROBERT MORSE - INGER STEVENS
SEE FEATUR E AT 1:05-3:05-5:10-7:15-9:25
T H U RSDAY!rr
I:.

(1965)

"Masterpiece !"
-Crist, N.Y. Herald Tribune
"Masterpiece ."
--O'Doherty, Life

Ann Arbor, Michigan
210 S. Fifth Avenue
782-9700

AN ADVENURE
IN DHERYLAND

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FRIDAY and
SATURDAY
Auditorium A
Angell Holl

7 and
9:15 P.M.
50c

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lo

A fEVW ARTS

1

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MICHIGAN.

DIAL 5-6290
ENDING THURSDAY

I

NOW

- THIS WEEK

I

--COMING FRIDAY
"Barefoot In the Park"

WILLIAM WYCHERLY'S
Riotous Restoration Farce
Ihe CountrqyWlee

6t FALL FESTIVAL
(SEPT. 19-NOV. 5)
3 NEW PRODUCTIONS

I

I

I

the eastern michigan
university summer
theatre presents

e'
"
iv'+

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Michel de Ghelderode's
t'.4 J

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UNIVERSITY PLAYERS-DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH

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