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July 11, 1967 - Image 6

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Michigan Daily, 1967-07-11

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, JULY I1; 1967

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, JULY 11, 1967

Marichal, Chance

Named

WBA Tourney Nearly Complete in Signing
Of Patterson To Fight Over Ah's Title

To Start in All-Star Gamel

ANAHEIM, Calif. (R) - San
Francisco's Juan Marichal, the
major leagues winningest pitcher,
and Dean Chance of the Minne-
sota Twins were named yesterday
to ppose each other as the starting
pitchers in today's All-Star base-
ball game.
Manager Walter Alston of the
National League All-Stars an-
nounced that Marichal would be
his starter, and Manager Hank
Bauer followed with word that
Chance would go for the American
League.
The rest of the National League
batting order has Lou Brock of
St. Louis leading off in left field;
Robert Clemente, Pittsburgh, right
field; Hanle Aaron, Atlanta, center
field; Orlando Cepeda, St. Louis,
first base; Rich Allen, Philadel-
phia, third base; Joe Torre, At-
lanta, catcher; Bill Mazeroski,
Pittsburgh, second bose; Gene Al-
ley, Pittsburgh, shortstop, and
Marichal.
Bauer said lis third baseman,
at Baltimore, Brooks Robinson,
would lead off and be followed by
Rod Carew, Minnesota, second
base; Tony Oliva, Minnesota, cen-
ter field; Harmon Killebrew, Min-
nesota, first base; Tony Congliaro,
Boston, right field; Carl Yas-
trzemiski, Boston, left field; Bill
Freehan, Detroit, catcher; Rico
Petrocelli, Boston, shortstop, and
Chance.
Marichal, 12-7, and Chance, 11-
7, each will be making his second
start in' All-Star competition.
Marichal, who has played in five
previous games, started in 1965
and allowed only one hit in his
three innings of pitching.
He didn't receive credit for the
victory that year, but his overall
All-Star record is 2-1, with a 0.82
earned run average.
Chance, who left Anaheim for
the Twins in a winter trade was
the American League starter in
1964 and blanked the National on
two hits in three innings.
That was his only All-Star ap-
pearance until this year.
Neither manager would say
what pitcher might follow the
starters, who can go no further
than the first three innings.
Bauer appearedhtobe in slightly
better position than Alston be-
cause five of his pitchers haven't
worked since Friday.
Neither team as regular center
fielder in the starting line-up.
Bauer is switching, Oliva, a reg-
ular right fielder, into center,
while Alston has tabbed Aaron as
his man for the job. Aaron also is
regularly a right fielder.
"I've given a little thought to
that position," Alston said. "I re-
serve the right to change my mind.
I'm sure I want Clemente in right
field, and Brock will be playing
left.
"So that would leave Aaron in
center. I considered putting Brock
in centerf and Aaron in left but
that would leave two men out of
position."

NEW YORK (P - The World
Boxing Association . approved
eight-man heavyweight elimina-
tion tournament was virtually
completed yesterday as Floyd
Patterson, the former two-time
champion, agreed to compete.
The 32-year-old New Yorker
probably will meet 22-year-old
Jerry Quarry of Los Angeles in
the fourth quarter-final at either

Los Angeles or Oakland, Calif.. Olympic Boxing Club of Los An- ' Yancey Durham, said he prefer-
Oct. 28. geles or Dan Chargin of the Bo- red to take one match at a time
Promoter Mike Malitz of Sports nanza Boxing Club of Oakland. for the hard-hitting 1964 Olympic
Action, Inc., which has organized Mrs. Eaton promoted the 10- champion.
the tournament to determine a round draw between Patterson Malitz said all of the 'tourney
successor to Muhammad Ali, said ?nd Quarry at Los Angeles a contestants had signed run of
it -will be up to the California month ago. the tournament contracts. He said
pi'omoter to announce Patterson's "If Quarry doesn't sign then most of them will receive a mini-

opponent, the date and site.
He said the promoter will be
either Mrs. Aileen Eaton of the

Turbocar To Revolutionize
Indy 500, Says Granetelli

we'll meet with the WBA to name mum of $50,000 for the quarter-
a replacement," said Malitz. finals, $75,000 against 30 per cent
Mexico's Manuel Ramos probably of the receipts for the semifinals,
would be the sub. and $125,000 against 30 per cent
All of the 12-round quarter- for the final.
finals, the 15-round semifinals He said the semifinals and
and final will be shown on home final will be held in the United
television in the United States by States. The Astrodome will be the
ABC-TV. site of one semifinal and the

4

-Associated Press
YUKKING IT UP before the All-Star game are National League Manager Walt Alston, left, and
American League Manager Hank Bauer at press conference in Anaheim, Calif., scene of today's
game.
Ryun, Keino Emerge Victorious
Middle-Distancepecialties

LOS ANGELES UIP) - A pair of
the world's most celebrated dis-
tance 'runners, Kansas collegian
Jim Ryun and Kenya policeman
Kipchoge Keino, emerged more
formidable than ever today in the
wake of the United States-British
Commonwealth track and field
meet.
Ryun, the lean, powerful holder
of the world mile record, added
the 1,500-meter mark to his grow-
ing record collection, running
3:33.1 Saturday in the opening
session of the two-day interna-
tional competition.
Keino, possessor of the world
3,000-meter mark and an easy,
loping stride, came back Sunday
to outduel Australia's great Ron
Clarke in the 5,000 meters with
a 13:36.8 dlocking.
Clarke was timed in 13:40.9.
DiminutivesG e r ry Lindgren,
America's lone hope against Keino
and Clarke, was bothered by foot
blisters and finnished a painful
third in 13:47.8.
Ryun, in beating Keino and
smashing the metric mile record
of 3:35.6 by Herb Elliott of Aus-
tralia in the 1960 Olympics, said:
"It was my plan all along to start
running well at this time of year.

I was surprised that I beat the
record by so much and I'm real
happy about the time."
Keino said: "'I didn't want to
come here because I've trained
only three weeks and I didn't feel
that I was in shape." But the
crowd-pleasing African continued
his mastery over Clarke and took
home honors as the outstanding
Commonwealth performer.
Asked about his loss to Ryun,
Keino flashed his wide grin:
"Ryun, he's a good guy. I think
I made a mistake by taking the
lead on the second lap and run-
ning it too fast. I killed myself
off.",
Then, in a bit of understate-
ment, Kipchoge concluded: "But
Ryun, he has a good sprint. He's
too fast."
On the whole, the U.S. men's
team dominated their Common-
wealth counterparts, 254 - 170,
while the visiting women gained
a 125-102 victory over the Ameri-
can gals.
Despite the lack of records,
however, crowds of 23,786 and
21,163 in Memorial Coliseum saw
a complement of strong perform-
ances on consecutive afternoons

of warm temperatures and sunny
skies.
Tommie Smith, the San Jose
State sprint sensation with the
overdrive kick, nipped rival Jim
Hines in 20.2 in the 200 meters
as the Texas Southern ace
clocked 20.3.
Oregon's Wade Bell powered
through the last 200 yards to
hold off Wilson Kiprught of Ke-
nya and win the 800 meters in
1:45.0, just one-tenth off Ryun's
American record.
Hurdler Ron Whitney, a Colo-
rado graduate, turned in.a life-
time best of 49.3 in the 400-meter
event, just two-tenths off the
world markby Rex Cawley of the
United States.
Ageless long jumper Ralph Bos-
ton cleared 27-0% on his initial
leap to beat Olympic champ Lynn
Davies of Wales, who had to be
content with fourth at 26-134.
Outstanding in the women's
competition were America's Mad-
eline Manning, who set a new
U.S. record, winning the 800 me-
ters in 2:01.6, and Australia's
petite Dianne Burge who doubled
with victories in the 100 meters,
11.5, and the 200, 23.2.

CHICAGO (AP)-A lot of rev-
olutionary things are going to be
seen in the Indianapolis 500 next
year, says Andy Granetelli whose
turbine racer made history and
started ' controversy there this
spring.
Driver Parnelli Jones breezed
the §TP-Paxton turbocar to with-
in 7% miles of victory in the Me-
morial Day classic before failure
of a $6 ball bearing put it out.
Until then, no machine was close
to matching it.
The turbine threatened to be
such a runaway that new restruc-
tions by the United States Auto
Club have made it all but impos-
sible for the same car to race at
Indy next year.
Reduction of the air intake, for
instance, would render the present
Pratt & Whitney turmine useless.
A new one would have to be devel-
oped to compensate for less air
and that would take years, says
Granatelli.
"We no.longer are going to offer
to handicap our turbocar," says
Granatelli, who will hold a news
League Leaders
AMERICAN LEAGUE
BATTING (200 at bats)-F.
Robinson, Balt., .327; Kaline,
Det., .328; Yastrzemski, BosC,
.324; CarewMinn., .313; Mi-
cher, Calif., .295.
RUNS BATTED IN - Kille-
brew, Minn., 62; F.NRobinson,
Balt., 59; Yastrzemski, Bost.,
56; Kaline, Det., 53; F. Howard,
Wash., 53.
HOME RUNS -- F. Howard,
Wash., 24; Killebrew, Minn., 22;
F. Robinson, Balt., 21; Yastr-
zemski,ABost., 19; Mantle, N,Y.,
16; McAuliffe, Det., 16.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTING (200 at bats)-Ce-
peda, St.L., .356; Clemente,
Pitt., .352; McCarver, St.L.,
.348; Staub, Houst., .346; Gon-
zales, Phil., .328.
RUNS BATTED IN - Wynn,
Houst., 65; Cepeda, St.L., 59;
Aaron, At., 57; Hart, S.F., 57;
Perez, Cin., 56.
HOME RUNS - Aaron, Atl.,
22; Wynn, Houst., 21; Perez,
Cin., 17; Santo, Chic., 17;
Banks, Chic., 15; Williams,
Chic., 15.

conference in Indianapolis today.
"We will henceforth maintain that
the car was designed and built to
the exact letter of USAC rules for
this year's 500 race and we have
no further intention on downgrad-
ing it. We want the right to race
it like we did in the 500, legally
and without restrictions."
Granatelli said that "our posi-
tion for the future is that if any
new burst of ingenuity is called
for, it is up .to our competitors to.
display it."
"Such ingenuity is already hard
at work," he added. "It is no secret
in racing circles that turbocharged
V-8 racing engines easily capable
of 700 horsepower, will'be entered
in the race next year. It is no
secret that a partial torque con-
verted racing transmission, multi-
plying power, will be ready. And
four-wheel drives will be on more
cars than just our STP Specials.
"The torque converted, which is
found on 90 per cent of all pas-
senger cars today, can double the
torque of a piston engine at lower
speeds. These transmissions, fitted
to either a four-cylinre or V-8
engine, could make the turbine
obsolete in a single race."

Shown on TV
All but the final will be on the
Saturday Wide World of Sports
prograb, starting at 5 p.m., East-
ern time. The final, projected for
January or February of next year,
will be shown on prime evening
time.
The other quarter-finals, an-
nounced previously, are:
Aug. 5 , Houston; Astrodome,
doubleheader, Ernie Terrell. Chi-
cago, ranked 4th by the WBA, vs.
Thad Spencer, San Francisco, No.
5, and Jimmy Ellis, Louisville, No.
8, vs. Leotis- Martin, Philadelphia,
No. 9.
Sept. 16, Offenbach Stadium,
Frankfurt, Germany, Karl Mil-
denberger, Germany, European
heavyweight champion and No. 1,
vs. Oscar Bonavena, Argentina,
No. 3.
Patterson is ranked sixth and
Quarry seventh.
Frazier vs. Chuvalo
That leaves only undefeated
Joe Frazier, No. 2, of Philadelphia,
and George Chuvalo, No. 10, of
Toronto, out of the tournament.
They will meet in a 12-rounder at
Madison Square Garden, July 19.
Frazier refused an invitation to
the tournament. His manager,

CENTER FOR JAPANESE STUDIES
in co-operation with the
C.I.C. SUMMER-ASIAN LANGUAGE INSTITUTE
PRESENTS
RICHARD K. BEARDSLEY
Professor of Anthropology at U of M
GIVING A PUBLIC LECTURE ENTITLED
JAPANESE RELIGIONS AND THEIR
SOCIAL FUNCTIONS TODAY
TUESDAY, JULY 11, AUDITORIUM A
8:30 P.M. ANGELL HALL

final.
Announce Dates
Malitz said the semifinal dates
and sites will be announced near
.the completion of the quarter-fi-
nals. ABC, however, said the
semis are tentatively scheduled
for Nov. 11 and Dec. 2.
Among those present at the
press conference were Bob Evans
of Louisville, the WBA president;
Mildenberger, Terrell, Martin, and
Al Bolan, Patterson's advisor.

"THE CLIMATE
FOR EDUCATION
IS PROGRESS.
the technique
is innovation"
F lorida
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EL E-MENTARY,
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TEACHERS
Want more facts?
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Name
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-- - -7

I

Major League
Standings
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L' Pct. GB
St. Louis 49 32 .605 -
- Chicago 46 36 .561 312
San Francisco 45 38 .542 5
Cincinnati 46 39 .541 5
Atlanta 42 39 .519 7
Pittsburgh 40 38 .513 714
Philadelphia 40 40 .500 8!2
Los Angeles 34 47 .420 15
Houston 33 50 .398 17
New York 31 47 .397 16yz
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
No gainesscheduled
TODAY'S GAME
American League All - Stars
(Chance, Minnesota, 11-7) vs. Na-
tional League All-Stars (Marichal,
San Francisco, 12-7) at Anaheim,
Calif., 7:30 p.m.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pet. GR
Chicago 47 33 .*88 -
Detroit 45 35 .563 2
Minnesota 45 36 556 21j
California 45 40 .529 4/
Boston 41 39 .513 '6
Cleveland 40 42 .488 8
Baltimore 39 43 .476 9
New York 36 45, .444,11/
Washington 36 47 .434 12
Kansas City 35 49 .417 14
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
No games scheduled
TODAY'S GAME
American League All - Stars
(Chance, Minnesota, 11-7) vs. Na-
tional League All Stars (Marichal,
San Francisco, 12-7) at Anaheim,
Calif., 7:30 p.m.

SPONSORS
UNION-LEAGUE
DUPLICATE BRIDGE
AT THE UNION
ROOM 3R
THURSDAY, 8:00 JULY 13
CASH PRIZES MASTERS POINTS

SUMMER LECTURE SERIES
Wednesday, July 12, at 8:15 P.M.
PROFESSOR HILLEL 1. SHUVAL
Associate Professor of Environmental Health
at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem
and
Environmental Health Consultant to the
Israel Defense Army
WILL DELIVER
A FIRST-HAND REPORT ON THE
RECENT EVENTS IN ISRAEL

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please send to:
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1906 Dorchester
Kalamazoo, Michigan 49001

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cordially invite you to a series of lectures on
SOCIETY-_ AND POLITICS
IN, POLAND TODAY'
by
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'Dice-Director and Chairman, Department of Political Sociology
Institute of Philosophy and Sociology
Polish Academy of Sciences

PRESENTS
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VIETNAM STUDY COURSE
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6t° FALL FESTIVAL
(SEPT. 19-NOV. 5)
3 NEW PRODUCTIONS

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July 1 1-"The Strategy of Containment and Future ConflictsI
in Southeast Asia"
Speaker: Walter Goldstein, visiting Professor from the
school of International Affairs at Columbia
Iul R-"l-itnrical Cultural 'nnd Snciolonicnl Rackarouncl of Vietnam"

WEDNESDAY,
JULY 12
WEDNESDAY,
JULY 19
WEDNESDAY.

"Political and Social Transformation
in Postwar Poland"
"The Party System in Poland in a
Comparative Perspective"
"Local Politics as an Instrument of

Michel de Ghelderode's
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