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July 08, 1967 - Image 6

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Michigan Daily, 1967-07-08

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;PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

0

SA'TT~flAV VTT.? !t_1RA

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Mma t)XFM J&&4 to Juju x bq AM) l

f

N ewcombe
In Easy Wi
WIMBLEDON, England (I)
John Necombe, 23-year-old Aus-
tralian Davis Cup ace, won thet
Wimbledon Tennis' title yester-f
day by crushing Wilhelm Bungertr
of West Germany 6-3, 6-1, 8-1 in; F
the most one-sided final in yearsx
In a massacre lasting only 75F
minutes, Newcombe regained
Wimbledon supremacy for thee
Australians, who now have taken
the crown nine times in 12 years.
Manuel Santana of Spain won it *
last year. %
The final proved a big disap- i
pointment for the 15,000 fans. 4
British tennis buffs expect more
excitement in the women's final
today pitting Mrs. Billie Jean
King of Long Beach, Calif.,
against Mrs. Ann Haydon Jones,
the first British finalist since
Angela Mortimer won in 1961.
Mrs. King teamed with Rose-
mary Casals of San Francisco for ,~"
a 6-1, 6-4 victory over the English
pair of Mrs. Jones and Virginia
Wade.
Nancy Richey of San Angelo,
Tex., and Maria Bueno of Brazil
won over Judy Tegart and Lesley
Turner of Australia 4-6, 6-4, 6-4. TWO VIEWS OF THE BACKHA
Misses Richey and Bueno, as John Newcombe, the champion, s]
defending champions were seeded
No. 1. The King-Casals duo was
No.3.Mrs. K
r. The men's final had been wide-rs I in
ly billed as a duel between Aus-
tralian power tennis and German
In LacU
gert, the first German to make
the final since Baron Gottfriend
Von Cramm in 1937, failed com-
pleelytoris toth ocasin. WIMBLEDON, England (A' -
Tpet er an s re istance asso Mrs. Billie Jean King, United a
feeble that Newcombe didnt need States Wightman Cup star who is
feeb pleyhatusualewcmerdidn'teedbidding to retain her Wimbledon C
to play his usual powerful game. title, had a tape recording to study a
rvic nd wascautousiyesterday. f
sheicetandwascatousey inIt was made by her law student s]
to the net and volleying, husband Larry on Wimbledon's f
But he did everything efficient- center court Thursday-a private
ly, and by playing at half-pres- running commentary on her 6-0, y
sure he easily won the title. 6-3 semi-finals victory over Kathy ti
Thus this see-sawing 81st, All- Harter, of Seal Beach, Calif.t
England tournament, which pro- The object-to help her prepare t
duced more upsets than any other for Saturday's final against Mrs.
in memory, remained unpredic- King's old British Wightman Cup W
table to the end. rival, Mrs. Ann Jones of Britain.
Bungert had defeated such irs. Jones made the final for the f
players as Thomas Koch of Bra- first time by defeating Rosemary b
ze and Roger Taylor of Brita on Casals, of San Francisco, 2-6, 6-3, A
expctheday toeina a oy7-5.
expected him to give in as easily "These tape recordings help me t
as he did. a lot," Mrs. King said. "Larry real- s
From the start of the tourna- ly sounds mad when I make a bad fi
ment, seeds were toppled like ten shot-and it really lets me know V
pi on the fastest grass cors when I've done something wrong. f
Perhaps the speed of the turf "He's improving match by
after a long spell of dry weather match. He did a marvellous rec- ti
helped to level the players and ng of my quarter-finals match fa
produce all the upsets.
Bungert started well enough. In p
the third game he hit two superbC
backhand service returns and
captured Newcombe's service at "
love to lead 2-1. tarts With Et
But in the next game the Ger-
man's form was just too bad to
be true. After leading 3-0 he ATLANTA (P)-The 1967 football t
double-faulted twice. Then, after season gets under way tonight ti
going to advantage point, he when the favored East battles the r
threw away three more points and West in the Coaches All-America
allowed Newcombe to break back. game featuring the passing of t
Bungert lacked a punishing Florida's Steve Spurrier.
volley, and Newcombe exploited The Heisman Trophy winner F
the weakness by offering him a will quarterback the East with E
couple of teasing lobs in the help from Purdue's Bob Griese, f
eighth game. Bungert failed to and the West may be hard-press- L
score with his smashes each time, ed to stop the expected passing V
bombardment.
and Newcombe went on to break Robrmet
and Nwco whe otoreand The West will be directed' by m
him with a chipped forehand on Bittenum, one of three Ar-
. i VAi.1.. Ptt kansplyron thesar o

service reLurn.knsspayr n-h tatn
In the third game of the second lineup manned by Coach Bob De-
set the German hit two wretched vaney of Nebraska.
half-volleys, and Newcombe then The game; which starts at 9:30
stroked a forehand past him to p.m., EDT, will be nationally tele-
break for a 2-1 lead. vised byuABC-TV, with Atlanta
Newcombe made some errors in blacked out.
the next game, and Bungert was The late start has hurt ticket
three times within a point of sales, and the crowd is expected to
breaking back. The German was; fall far short of the 38,000 that
unlucky with two lobs which nar- turned out a year ago, first time
rowly missed the baseline, and the game was played in Atlanta
Newcombe survived to win that after five years in Buffalo, N.Y.
game and then strolled forward to Rain has cooled Atlanta the
a victory that became easier with last two days and temperatures
almost every game, under clearing skies are expected

Beats

Bungert

RYUN-KEINO DUEL:
U.s..Commo.wealtl Games
Get Underway in Los Angeles

mbledon Final

$i~

LOS ANGELES (R')-The U.S.-
British Commonwealth track and
field festival gets underway for a
two-day swing today with more
than 180 men and women athletes
from 31 countries competing in
the 32 events on the program.
Warm weather, with doubtless
a touch 'of Los Angeles' famed
smog, was predicted for the event
in Memorial Coliseum, one ac-
claimed as the greatest show in
athletics since the 1932 Olympic
Games in the same arena.
There will be an international
decathlon staged separately from
the main program between ath-
letes from the United States, the
Commonwealth and West Ger-
many.
Kip Keino in the 1,500 masters,
Australia's Ron Clarke, U.S. star
Gerry Lindgren and possibly
Keino in the 5,000 meters..-.
Randy Matson inthe shot put,
Bob Seagren and Paul Wilson,
the new pole vault champion,
sprinters Jim Hines, Tommie
Smith and Charlie Green, all in
red, white and blue ...
Australia's Judy Pollock and
Charlette Cooke of the U.S.A... .
These are some of the names
familiar throughout the world of
track that are on deck.
The Ryun-Keino clash in the

1,500 has fans in a dither.
What are the chances of break-
ing the world record of 3:35.6
which Aussie Herb Elliott set in
Rome in 1960?
"I don't like to commit myself
before a meet," said Ryun who
has been training at 7,500-foot
altitude in Colorado since he ran
the fastest mile ever, 3:51.1, two
weeks ago.
"The important thing in this

meet is to win," Ryun added.
"Records are sometimes made
while running alone, but more
often they come from competi-
tion," said Keino, who has also
been training at home in high
altitudes.
Decathlon entries include West
Germany's Kurt Bendlin, who this
season scored 8,319 points to
break Russ Hodge's world, record
of 8,230.

is

11

Miajor League Standings

I

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Chicago
Detroit
Minnesota
Boston
x-California
Cleveland
Baltimore
New York
x-Kansas City
Washington
--Late game

W L Pet. GB
46 31 .598 -
43 34 .559, 3
43 35 .551 3%
40 37 .519 6
42 40 .512 6Y2
39 40 .494 8
37 42 ,470 10
35 43 .449 11Y2
35 46 .432 13
34 46 .425 13
not included.

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Cleveland 6, Washington 3
New York 3, Baltimore 0
California 7, Kansas City 2 (1st)
Chicago 2, Minnesota 1
Detroit 5, Boston 4
TODAY'S GAMES
Kansas City at California
Minnesota at Chicago (2)
Boston at Detroit (2)
Washington at Cleveland (2)
New York at Baltimore (t-n)

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
St. Louis 48 31 .608 --
Chicago 46 34 .575 21
Cincinnati 46 37 .554 4
Atlanta 42 37 .530 6
x-San Francisco 42 38 .525 6X
Pittsburgh 38 38 .500 81
Philadelphia 39 39 .500 8'..
x-Los Angeles 34 44 .436 131
New York 29 47 .382 17' j
Houston 31 50 .383 18
x-Late game not included.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
St. Louis 5, Philadelphia 1
Cincinnati 6, Pittsburgh 2
Atlanta 3, New York 2
Houston 11, Chicago 5"
,Los Angeles at San Francisco (inc)
TODAY'S GAMES
Atlanta at New York
St. Louis at Philadelphia
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh
Chicago at Houston
Los Angeles at San Francisco

ND that bested Germany's Wilhelm Bungert in the men's finals at Wimbledon yesterday. Australia's
shows the style that led him to. an easy 6-3, 6-1, 6-1 victory over Bungert in 75 minutes of play.
r Favored To Beat Mrs. Jones
es Wimbledon Singles Final

----

-- ---

with Virginia Wade. It taught me
lot."
Mrs. King, from Long Beach,
,alif., is favored to win the title
gain-even though Mrs. Jones de-
eated her at the Kent Champion-
,hips at Beckenham two weeks be-
ore Wimbledon began.
In all their meetings over the
ears, that was only the second
ime the English girl had defeated
Vrs. King on grass. The other.
ime was at Wimbledon in 1962.
Yesterday was men's final day.
Nilhelm Bungert, the first Ger-
ian to reach the final since Gott-
ried Von Cramm in 1937, was
eaten by John Newcombe, of
ustralia, 6-3, 6-1, 6-1.
But for the British crowds, the
alking point was still Mrs. Jones'
uccess in reaching the women's
nal. Thursday was her sixth
imbledon semifinal-and the the
irst time she had ever won.
A spell of dry weather has left
,e Wimbledon courts unusually
'st--and the critics believe this is
neriea Ga-me
st ,Favored
o be in the 60's or 70's at game
ime, about 20 degrees below the
eadings last year.
Both teams have won three of
he previous games but Spurrier's
assing, the running of famed
Floyd Little of Syracuse and Nick
iddy of Notre Dame and the de-
ensive play of linebackers Jim
ynch of Notre Dame, George
Jebster of Michigan State and
aul Naumoff of Tennessee have
nade the East a seven-point fav-
rite.

parly the reason for so many upset
results. Newcombe was the only
seeded player to make the men's
semifinals.
Mrs. King said: "When I came to
practice here the week before the
tournament I found the courts un-
believably fast. I had never known
the ball come off the turf like that.
"The center courts is now a bit
worn and it has slowed down a
bit, thank Heaven.
"People think of me as a serve-
and volley player and then ima-
gine that the faster the court is,
the better I like it. But that isn't

SCORES

Men's Singles-Final
John Newcombe, Australia,
defeated Wilhelm Bungert, West
Germany, 6-3, 6-1, 6-1.
Women's Doubles
Maria Bueno, Brazil, and
Nancy Richey, San Angelo, Tex.,
defeated Judy Tegart and Les-
ley Turner, Australia, 4-6, 6-4,
6-4.
Mrs. Billie Jean King, Long
Beach, Calif., and Rosemary
Casals, San Francisco, defeated
Mrs. Ann Jones and Virginia
Wade, Britain, 6-1, 6-3.
Mixed Doubles-Quarter-Finals
Mixed Doubles
Ken Fletcher, Australia, and
Maria Bueno, Brazil, defeated
Alexander Metreveli and Mrs.
Anna Dmitrieva, Russia, 6-8, 7-
5, 16-14.
Mrs. Billie Jean King, Long
Beach, Calif., and Owen David-
son, Australia, defeated Frew
McMilland and Annette Van Zyl,
South Africa, 6-3, 3-6, 6-1.

so. The courts were too fast for
me at first. I like more time to
play my shots.
Mrs. King defeated - Brazil's
Maria Bueno in last year's final.
She was also a finalist in 1963,
losing to Austialia's Margaret
Smith.
Mrs. Jones, now 28, had a tough
battle before overcoming little
Miss Casals, who is just 18 and is
playing in her second Wimbledon
tournament.
The English player said after-
wards: "Maria Bueno and I are
the old brigade, and our day will
soon be passing. Rosemary is the
sort of player who is going to take
over the fight for the title in the
years to come.'
Billie Jean wanted Rosemary
to win, because she's been helping
her with her game in recent
months.
The champion commented:
"Rosey's trouble at the moment
is that she presses a bit too hard.
She looks so good, even when she's
losing. She needs to improve her
basic technique a little more-then
she'd be a real threat to all of us."
At least two of the Wimbledon
finalists-Bungert and Mrs. Jones
-have shown strange caution in
their approach to their big
matches.
Bungert, who runs a sports out-
fitter's wholesale business in Dus-
seldorf, said: "I don't have to win.
My business is my main concern."
Mrs. Jones said: "I have no
burning ambition to win Wimble-
don. Of course, I will try-but it
won'tbe the end of the world if
I fail."
Mrs. King said she is out to win
again tday and then aim for the
grand - slam next year - the
women's titles of Australia, France,!
Wimbledon and Forest Hills.

" NORMAN COUSINS
Editor, Saturday Review
" ROGER STEVENS
Chairman, National Council,
" ME LVIN LASKY
Editor, Encounter Magazine

on the Arts

Thursday, July 13-9:30 AM. Thursday, July 13-9:30 A.M.
Rackham Lecture Hall Rackham Amphitheatre

You Are Cordially invited
to Each Conference Session
on
THE UNIVERSITY AND THE BODY POLITIC
July 12-14, 1967
Wednesday, July 12-2:00 P.M.
Rackham Lecture Hall
"The Role of the University in Cultural Development"

"The Role of the University
in Research"
" A. GEOFFREY NORMAN
Vice-President, Univ. of Michigan
" LEE A. DuBRIDGE
President, California
Institute of Technology
" JOHN PERKINS
President, Univ. of Delaware
" JAMES WEBB
Administrator, N.A.S.A.
* ARTHUR FLEMMING
President, Univ. of Oregon
" LAWRENCE HAFSTAD
Vice-President, General Motors Corp.

"The Role of the State
University in Providing
Services to Government
and the Public"
" JAMES K. POLLOCK
James O. Murfin Professor of
Political Science, Univ. of Michigan
" JOHN W. LEDERLE
President, Univ. of Massachusetts
" EDWARD H. LITCHFIELD
Chairman of the Board,
Smith-Corona Marchant, Inc.
" MALCOLM MOOS
Program Officer-In-Charge,
The Ford Foundation
" JOSEPH SATTERTHWAITE
Consultant to the Administrator,
N.A.S.A.

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