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June 21, 1967 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1967-06-21

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PAGE SIB

rHE MICHICA IIAILY ,

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY
U

+= s" v. +w . .p Yew mar: !M'+] VV

Aui
For

Gets

5-Year

Sentence

AL RACE TIGHTENS:
Detroit Moves up on Chicago;
St. Louis Bolsters League Lead

0

Riefusmng

Indu ction

Released on Bond for Appeal;
Quic Decision ncludes Fine

*

*

*

*

*

*

By The Associated Press
HOUSTON, Tex.-Heavyweight
Champion, Muhammad Ali lost a
bout in Federal Court yesterday
as an all-white jury found him
guilty on a charge of refusing in-
duction into the military service
and was promptly sentenced to
five years in prison.
Ali, in a surprise move, asked
Federal Judge Joe Ingraham to
sentence him imediately after the
jury deliberated only 21 minutes.
However, the maneuver appear-
ed to be a formality, since at-
torneys immediately said they will
appeal the case and Ali left the
court on the same $5,000 bond he
had been under since May 8, when
he was indicted.
The sentence was the maximum
provided for such a case and his
attorneys said it had been ex-
pected. He will also be fined
$10,000,
The verdict ended a trial that
had lasted less than two days and
had included less than five hours
of testimony by only eight wit-
nesses-four for each side.
All did not take the stand.
Ali has claimed the draft exemp-
tion on the grounds he is Black
Muslim minister,.
Before the closing arguments,
Judge Ingraham heard--out of the
presence of the jury-a seven-
point motion seeking an instructed
verdict as acquittal. He rejected it.
Attorney Hayden Covington said
in the motion that Ali is only a
parttime boxer and that the min-
istry unquestionably is his voca-
tion.
"He is sort of a traveling bishop,
going from mosque to mosque,
temple to temple, bringing in great
crowds in every city he visits."
But U.S. Atty. Morton L. Sus-
man said that in the occupation
blank of the medical information
Ali filled out April 28, he had
written, "heavyweight boxing world
champion."
Judge Ingraham also noted that
All's draft board file included sev-
eral letters Ali had written to the
board in 1966, saying he was leav-
ing the country to fight.
Ingraham noted specifically it
was not the duty of the jury to
decide whether the defendant was
due an exemption from the draft
because of his religion.

"The court has read the draft
board file and has found there was
a basis in fact for 1-A classifica-
tion," Ingraham told the jurors.
"You are not to consider this."
Ingraham had made such a
finding while turning down a de-
fense motion for an instructed
verdict of acquittal.
U.S. Atty. Morton L. Susman
argued that Ali's fight with selec-
tive service officials amounted to
"a determined and ingenious effort
to avoid military service."
Alis attorneys, Hayden Coving-
ton of New York City, and Quin-
nan Hodges of Houston told the
jury Clay had sincere religious
beliefs when he refused April 28
to take the step forward as re-
quired by law upon induction into
the Armed Services.
Asst. U.S. Atty. Carl Walker Jr.
replied that "sincerity is not an
issue here The issue is whether or
not the defendant obeyed the law."

Ecuador Upsets America
In Davis Cup Zone Final

By The Associated Press
The Washington Senators cap-
italized on two unearned runs--
one on an obstruction play-for
a 4-2 victory over the Chicago
White Sox last night.
hIn DetroitAl Kalinedoubled
home the tying run and Jim
Northrup singled him in with the
winner in the eighth inning, pull-
ing the Detroit Tigers from be-
hind to a 2-1 victory over the
California Angels, to tighten up
the American League race.
The Chicago loss ended a three-
game winning string for the Amer-
ican League leaders.
Frank Bertaine, acquired from
Baltimore in the recent Mike Ep-
stein trade, posted his first vic-
tory for the Senators with relief
help from Darold Knowles.
The key play of the game oc-
curred in the sixth inning, when
the Senators, leading 2-1, had run-
ners on first and second with two
out.
Paul Casanova singled up the
middle and center fielder Tommie
Agee fired a strike home, nailing
Epstein at the plate. The um-
pires, however, ruled third base-
man Don Buford obstructed Ep-
stein and the run was allowed.
Major LeagueI
Standings

GUAYAQUIL, Ecuador tP) -
Texan Cliff Richey salvaged a
final singles victory over Miguel
Olvera yesterday that made the
final score 3-2 in favor of the
jubilant Ecuador tennis team over
the United States in the American
Zone final of the Davis Cup tour-
nament.
The last loss, which had no sig-
nificance, failed to dim the en-
thusiasm of the home forces, still
celebrating their amazing upset of
the favored Americans.
The clinching triumph was sup-
plied Monday by 21-year-old Fran-
cisco Guzman when he tumbled
Arthur Ashe, America's top-rank-
ing amateur, for a 3-1 advantage

in the best-of-five series.
Guzman, the son of a banker,
and Olvera, a once sickly young-
ster from a poor family, did the
entire giant-killing job.
Richey won the opening singles
match over Guzman on Saturday.
But on Sunday Guzman and 01-
vera combined to whip the heavily
favored doubles team of Clark
Graebner and Marty Riessen,
while Olvera toppled Ashe.
The Americans -had been favored
to win by at least 4-1. The experts
figured the Yankees might lose a
singles match but few, if anyone,
believed the South Americans
could vanquish the seasoned dou-
bles team of Graebner, of Beach-

wood, Ohio, and Riessen, of Evan-
ston, Ill.
The surprise triumph sent Ecua-
dor into the interzone finals for
the first time. The South Amer-
icans will meet the winner of the
European Zone A final between
Spain and Russia.
It was the sixth time in eight
years that the United States failed
to make the Challenge Round. It
used to be an annual affair be-
tween the United States and Aus-
tralia.
The news of the upset stunned
Australia, land of the Cup holders.
The Americans' loss will be costly
to the Australians because no
other team fills the stadium there
like the Americans.
This year the Challenge Round
will be held at the 7,025-seat Mil-
ton Courts in Brisbane, Dec. 26-28.

Detroit reliever George Brunet
put himself in hot water by hit-
ting Don Wert with a pitch with
one out in the inning and Ka-
line followed with his shot against
the left field wall. Bill Freehan
was walked intentionally before
Northrup singled to right.
Right-hander Larry Jackson
continued his niastery of the New
York Mets, blanking them on only
one hit-a second inning double by
Tommy Davis-as the Philadel-
phia Phillies breezed to a 4-0 vic-
tory.
The victory gave the. 36-year-
old Jackson an 18-0 lifetime mark
against New York. Only San Fran-
cisco's Juan Marichal has, done
better against the Mets, having
beaten them 19 times in l9 deci-
sions.
Joe Foy hit a grand slam homer
in the fifth inning and Carl Yas-
trzemski followed with a bases-
empty blast as the Boston Red
Sox crushed the New York Yank-
ees 7-1 behind the five-hit pitch-
ing of Gary Bell.
The loss was the Yankees' fourth
in a row. Foy walloped his grand
slam into the left field seats and
Yasthzemski drove his 17th homer
of the year against the upper deck
facade in right.
Dal Maxvill broke a 2-2 tie with
a run-producing triple in the sev-
enth inning and Orlando Cepeda
hit a three-run homer in the
eighth as league-leading St. Louis
beat Houston 6-2.
Larry Jaster won his fourth,
game of the year against two
defeats, but needed relief from

Ron Willis in the ninth.
The victory was St. Louis' third
straight.
Belinsky's throwing error gave
St. Louis a run in the first inning
on Flood's hit and Maxvill's
squeeze bunt hit in the second
scored. Tim McCarver, who had
doubled.
Houston tied it with a run in
the second on singles by Jim.Lan-
dis, Chuck Harrison and Bob Lillis
and an unearned run in the fourth
as Rusty Staub singled and reach-
ed third when Alex Johnson let
the ball get through' him - and
Landis' sacrifice fly.
Luis Tiant hit a home run and
won his sixth straight game, with
ninth inning relief help from
Steve Bailey, as the Clevland In-
dians held off Kansas City 5-3,
for their third straight victory.
Tiant, who his his first homer
with none on in the seventh for
a 5-1 lead, entered the ninth with
a three-hitter.
Chuck Hartenstein pitched 4
2/3 innings of scoreless relief
while Ted Savage and Ron Santo
cracked three hits apiece as the
Chicago Cubs trimmed Pittsburgh
5-3 Tuesday night, snapping the
Pirates, three - game winning
streak.
Hartenstein, picking up his
sebond major league victory, re-
lieved Joe Niekro after the Chi-
ago starter was touched for a
three run pinch homer by Don
Clendenon. He stopped Pittsburgh
on four hits the rest of the way.

4

AMERICAN'

Harry Hopman, the
the Australian Davis
said he found it hard
the news.
"Ecuador beat us
square," said Richey,

captain of
cup team,
to believe

Chicago
Detroit
Cleveland
Minnesota
Boston
Baltimore
Calif ornia
Kansas City
New York
Washington

LEAGU
W L
36 24
35 28
33 31
32 31
32 31
30 32
32 36
31 35
28 34
29 36

E

Pct*
.601
.sob
.556~
.516
.508
.508
.484
.41
.47Q1
.452
.446

fair

and

West Scores
Victory in
NCAA Play

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Cleveland 5, Kansas City 3
Boston 7, New York 2
Detroit 2, Cleveland 1
Washington 4, Chicago 2
Only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
Washington at Chicago (2, t-n)
I'innesota at Detroit (n)
California at Cleveland (n)
Kansas City at Baltimore (u)
Boston at New York (uI)
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct.

GB
a--
62f
5
5>?
514
7
8
9
GB
-
85
5%
5
08
9
13
15
171~

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Specializing in GERiIIIAN FOOD,
FINE BEER, WINE, LIQUOR
PARKING LOT ON ASHLEY ST.
Hours: Daily 1 1 A.M.-2 A.M. Closed Mondays

SHAWNEE - ON - DELAWARE,
Pa. (P)--The west scored its fourth
straight victory over the East yes-
terday in the 33rd annual NCAA
intersectional links rivalry.
The competition on a cool,
cloudy day, served as a warm-up
for the 70th annual NCAA team
and individual championships
which get underway Wednesday on
the same course where in the
1930s, Paul Runyan won the PGA
from Sam Snead.
It was the sixth win in the last
eight years for the West, which
hasn't lost since 1963.

St. Louis
x-Cincinnati
x-San Francisco
Pittsburgh
Chicago
x-Atlanta
Philadelphia
x-Los Angeles
Houston
New York

38
40
34
33
33
31
29
26
26
20

22
26
28
28
28
31
32.
36
40
39

.633
.606
.548
.541
.541
.540
.475
.419
.394
.339

4

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Piliadelphia 4, New York 0
Chicago 5, Pittsburgh 3
St. Louis 6, Houston 2
Atlanta at Los Angeles (inc)
Cincinnati at San Francisco (inc)
TODAY'S GAMES
New York at Philadelphia (n)
Chicago at Pittsburgh (n)
Cincinnati at Houston (n)
St. Louis at Los Angeles (n)
Atlanta at San Francisco

OPEN: Mon., Wed. and Thurs., 4 P.M. to 2 A.M.
OPEN: Fri., Sat., Sun., Noon to 3 A.M. (Closed Tuesday)
DeLONG'S PIT BARBECUE
314 DETROIT ST., ANN ARBOR, MICH.
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-Associated Press
MUIAMMAD ALI is mobbed by friends and well-wishers after being sentenced to five years in
prison in the Houston Federal Court. He was released on $5,40 bond, pending an appeal of the
decision.

.r

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.

,.

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Service
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