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June 14, 1967 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1967-06-14

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 196'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE IHREN

WEDNESDAY JUNE 14 1987 TH IHGADIL GITEE

.4NATO
Rusk Urges
U.S.-Soviet
Peace Effort
Asks Joint Attemptr
To Avoid Arms Race
In Middle East Nations
LUXEMBOURG (AP)-A major-
ity of North Atlantic Treaty Or-
ganization nations proclaimed sup-
port yesterday for key Israeli
peace demands, including rights to
use the Suez Canal.
At the same time Secretary of
State Dean Rusk -urged a joint
! attempt with the Soviet Union to
head off another arms race in the
turbulent Middle East.
Meanwhile, President Johnson
repeated ,his pledge tosupport ter-
ritorial and political integrity in
the Middle East but adopted a
wait-and-see attitude on how to
do it. Sovi
At a news conference Johnson yester
referred several times to his May Fedor
23 statement committing the Unit- Israeli
ed States to the independence and
territorial integrity of all the na-
tions of the Middle East.
In the regular spring political
session of NATO's 15-member
council, foreign ministers of smal-
ler nations staged a little revolt
against what they called the Unit- 1
ed States' secret handling of last
week's war crisis.
Complaining about the lack of B
consultation with European mem- The A
ber nations, West German Vice for a n
Chancellor Willy Brandt said the revenge
episode had shown Europe to be warfare
in danger of becoming "a polit- and Bri
ically underdeveloped area." backing
The French struck another dis- war.
cordant note during the opening "The
of the two-days talks. Foreign me f
Minister Maurice Couve de Mur- armed f
vile served notice France means importa
to follow its own independent line fronting
in Middle East peacemaking. battle bi
The six-day Arab-Israeli war termma
dominated the speeches of almost in comin
all the foreign ministers who en- hurriya,
tered the debate on world affairs. only pc
Most were explicit in backing the Socialist
Israeli position on certain crucial Thisd
issues, Syria, E

oceli Peace

Support
Demands

THIRD NIGHT OF VIOLENCE:
Renewed Gunfire Breaks Out
In Festering Tampa Ghetto

11

-Associated Press
ET AMBASSADOR TO THE UNITED NATIONS, Nikolai T. Fedorenko, right, spoke earlier
day to Danish Ambassador Hans R. Tabor, president of the UN Security Council this month,
enko submitted a resolution to the council condemning Israel as the agressor in the Arab-
I conflict.
*ab Press Asks Rearmament;
1EmbargoesStillEffective

Fedorenko
Hits Israeli;
Aggression'
Assembly May Debate
Middle East Conflict,<
Proposed Resolution
UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. ()-t
The Soviet Union sought last
night to force a showdown in the
UN Security Council on the with-
drawal of Israeli troops from oc-
cupied Arab territory. The Soviet
effort was delayed, however, by ac
vote to adjourn until today. 1
Soviet delegate Nikolai T. Fe- 1
dorenko submitted a new resolu-
tion to the 15-nation Security
Council so tough in its condemna-!
tion of Israel it was given vir-I
tually no chance for approval.,
It came on the heels of a So-
viet request to Secretary-General
U Thant for the emergency as-
sembly session-a request that
bogged down in a maze of legal
technicalities that threatened to
delay for some time any assembly
consideration of the Middle East!
crisis.
But if the council does not ap-i
prove the resolution, Fedorenko
could then push his request for
immediate -assembly debate on a
better legal and political basis.
In a speech to the council bris-
tling with accusations against Is-
rael, he indicated that this was
what he had in mind.
He declared that if the council
did not act. quickly on the Soviet
resolution, "then it will be nec-
essary to seek other ways to see
to it that the United Nations does
its duty under the charter.''
He recalled a statement to the
council by U.S. Ambassador
Arthur J. Goldberg on May 24 de-
claring the United States was
bound to maintain the territorial
integrity of all countries in the
Middle East. He challenged 'Gold-
berg to declare whether this was
still the U.S. position.
Goldberg rejected the Soviet
resolution, calling it a prescription
for renewed hostilities in the
Middle East.
The resolution acknowledged the
existence of a cease-fire, but called
on the council to vigorously con-
demn Israeli occupation of Egyp-
tian, Syrian and Jordanian ter-
ritory as "an act of aggression and
the most flagrant, violation of the
UN Charter."
Meanwhile, Israel began admin-
istering its conquered territory
west of the River Jordan as vir-
tually a separate political entity.
A tight military cordon cuts off
the Old City of Jerusalem and the
west bank of the Jordan from
Israel. Reliable sources said even-
tually a network of customs and
frontier posts will cut off the
Arabs in the conquered area of
Jordan until a final settlement is
made.
The Arabs will be administered
by Israelis and will be unable to
pass freely into Israel, these
sources said.

TAMPA, Fla, (P) - National
Guard troops and hundreds of
police reinforcements were order-
ed out of riot-torn Negro areas
after dark yesterday by Sheriff
Malcolm Beard who said, "I'm go-f
ing to take a chance."
Beard said he took the action
after meeting at two schools with
several hundred Negro residents:
who promised there would be no
trouble in the neighborhoods if
extra police were pulled away.
Police investigating a report'
that a crowd was gathering on
22nd Avenue scene of scattered
violence Monday night, were fired
upon by a woman who ran out
of a Negro bar carrying a pistol.
A small group of helmeted of-
ficers armed with shotguns were
talking to a crowd of about two
dozen Negroes when the woman
fired at least three shots at them.
The officers dived behind their
cruisers, then ran after the
woman as she ducked into an-
other bar. They came out holding
her by the arm, put her in a
patrol car, and hurried out of the
area.
Meanwhile, riot-hardened police
and National Guardsmen marched
back into the trouble areas yes-
terday as Negro leaders groped
for a way to end the violence
which erupted last Sunday..
Most of the 1,000 troops and
police had pulled out at daylight

WASHINGTON (P)-Sen. John
Stennis, urging Senate censure of
Sen. Thomas J. Dodd, accused the
Connecticut Democrat yesterday
of financial wrongdoings and de-
clared that this cannot be for-
given without condoning laxity in
conrgessional conduct.
Dodd insisted he is not guilty.
And he said that if he is judged
a thief, he should not be censured
but expelled from the Senate.
"I do not ask for mercy," the
white-haired Dodd said. "I ask
for justice."

By The Associated Press
.rab press called yesterday
ew arms buildup to seek
from Israel and for oil
against the United States
itain, accusing them of
the Israelis in last week's
new organization of the
orces takes first place in
nce among the tasks con-
us. We have lost the
ut our potential and de-
tion can assure us victory
ng battles," said Al Gum-
publication of Egypt's
olitical party, the Arab
Union.
declaration was echoed in1
Egypt's chief ally in the

to rest after 11 hours of battling, ities, and police harassment,
Negro mobs that shot at police, But, as the violence waned in
tossed fire bombs into buildings the early morning, Gilder said he
and looted wrecked stores. felt it was only the calm before
Robert Gilder, president of the a renewed storm. More trouble
Tampa branch of the National will come, he predicted, because
Association for the Advancement "nothing has been done" about
of Colored People, went into the the problems of the Negro.
debris-littered streets to urge his As the city of 300,000, Florida's
people to take their grievances to second largest, waited tensely for
the conference table. another nightfall, a special in-
Gilder pleaded with them to or- quiry was convened on the shoot-
ganize a mass meeting where city ing of a 19-year-old Negro by
officials could listen to their a white policeman. This was the
claims of joblessness, shabby incident that triggered the racial
housing, poor recreational facil- uprising.
Dodd Asks for Justice'
As Censure Case Opens

Middle East war that ended dis-
astrously for Arab arms.
Al Thawra, the Syrian govern-
ment newspaper in Damascus, as-
serted:
"The mission of every Arab to-
day can be summed up in the
following words: Prepare for re-
taliatory fire against the enemy."
Washington reports said the
Soviet Union, is delivering new
shipments of arms to Egypt, in-
cluding MIG jet fighters. U.S. of-
ficials said, however, they are
previously scheduled arms ship-
ments.
While the Arab press called for
nationalization of U.S. and Brit-
ish oil interests, in addition to oil
embargoes, Saudi Arabia seemed
to be slipping out of line.

a ":::.. ""."v.. +.... - -x::}-:.i s' . Y.. ~s... :.......".i :,,..... :. : .. ,S"...a..'v..,.ah+vAA {y} Jo
DAI LY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
f.SS.,.VWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

A spokesman for Arabian-
American Oil Co., which operates
in Saudi Arabia, said the com-
pany there had returned to nor-
mal although the oil embargo
against the United States and
Britain continues. He said re-
fineries were again operating, and
loading of oil tankers began Mon-
day.
Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Iraq and
Algeria have banned oil ship-
ments to Britain and the United
States.
Cairo's Middle East News Agen-
cy said Arab oil producers are
ready to let France and Spain
replace the British and American
oil companies that heve developed
most of the Middle East oil
fields.
Sheik Abdulla Tariki, former
Saudi Arabian oil minister, pro-
posed the nationalization of the
oil industry in all the Arab states,
saying foreign help is no longer
needed.
In Iraq, which sent planes and
troops to the war, Mohammed Al
Saidi, minister of economy, said
his government was thinking of
breaking trade relations with the
United States and Britain, the
Middle East News Agency re-
ported.
In the aftermath of the war,
that left the economies of Egypt,
Syria and Jordan near collapse,
fundes were pouring in from
other Arab states.
A compilation in Beirut showed
$70,780,000 donated so far, the
bulk of it a $70-million gift from
oil-rich Kuwait to Egypt, Jordan,
Syria and Iraq.

SWorld Niews Roundup
By The Associated Press federal government from enforcing
WASHINGTON -U.S. Solicitor provisions of the- federal wage law
General Thurgood Marshall was was extended yesterday until the
appointed to the Supreme Court U.S. Supreme Court rules on the
yesterday, pending Senate confir- case.
mation, by President Lyndon The panel ruled 2-1 that mini-
Johnson. mum wage provisions of the 1966
Maishall, who argued 32 cases legislation were valied. But one of
before the nation's highest court the majority judges said overtime
as a lawyer for the National Asso- provisions might be unconstitu-
ciation for the Advancement of tional, and the third judge said
Colored People, became Solicitor both wage and overtime provisions
General in 1965. were unconstitutional.
One of his NAACP cases brought * * *
the court's historic 1954 ruling NEW DELHI, India -The In-
that race segregation in public dian government last night re-
schools is unconstitutional. taliated against Red China's ex-
* *. * pulsion of two Indian diplomats
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia-Yugo- by accusing Peking's first secre-
slavia followed other Communist tary in New Delhi of "grossly sub-
countries and broke off diplomatic versive activities."
relations yesterday with Israel. Red China put an Indian dip-
Romania remained the only Euro- lomat on public trial in absentia
pean Communist country con- Tuesday and then ordered him
tinuing relations.' and another Indian diplomat in
* * Peking expelled for "espionage
BALTIMORE, Md.-A tempo- activities," Radio Peking an-
rary court order restraining the nounced.

Stennis, the square-jawed Mis-
sissippi Democrat cast in the role
of prosecutor, spent two hours
setting forth the charges lodged
by the Senate ethics committee:
-That Dodd improperly put to
personal use at least $116,083
raised through seven testimonial
affairs and a political campaign.
-That Dodd billed both the
Senate and private organizations
for travel expenses on, seven of-
ficial trips.
Political Funds
In his opening argument, Sten-
nis concentrated on the proposed
use of political funds.
"There emerges an inescapable
conviction that the senator from
Connecticut deliberately set out
on this course of conduct, to con-
vert to his own use funds over
which he held only a trustee or
fiduciary control," Stennis said.
Furthermore,' the ethics com-
mittee chairman said, he was con-
vinced of the truth of testimony
that Dodd had directed his book-
keeper to bill the governments as
well as private groups for seven
official trips.
Dodd made public his defense
statement before he delivered it
to the Senate, and it dealt heavily
with the dual billing charge.
In it, Dodd swore that no travel
bill was submitted twice at his
behest.
DIAL 5-6290
-ODGERS..HAMMEMSTENIN
ROBERT WISE
0 COLOR I~
---
nIMRIRO

. I

The Daily Official Bulletin is art
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumpes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Satarday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
information call 764-9270.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14
Day Calendar
Conference-"Midwest Fulbright' Con-
ference on Higher Education": Regis-
tration, Lobby, South .Quadrangle, 1
p.m.
Conference-"International Confer-
ence on Systemati cBiology": Rackham
Lecture Hall, 2 pm.
General Notices
Student Laboratory Theatre Program:
Dept. of Speech performance of
scenes from "Britannicus" by Racine
i and "Don Carlos" by Schiller. Arena
Theatre, Frieze Bldg., Thurs., June 15,
4:10 p.m., admission free.
Doctoral Examination for Paul David
Weener, Education; thesis: "The In-
fluence of Dialect Differences on the
Immediate Recall of Verbal Messages,"

Wed., June 14, Room 4209 UHS, at 1:30,
p.m. Chairman, N. A. Flanders.
Doctoral Examination for Larry Lee
Butcher. Psychology; thesis: "Dopamin-
ergic Correlates of Lever-Positioning in
the Rat," Wed., June 14, Conference
Room, Kresge Hearing Research Insti-
tute, 1301 E. Ann, at 3 p.m. Co-Chair-
men, Stephen Fox, Univ. of Iowa, and
W. C Stebbins.
Doctoral Examination for Jeffrey Lee
Johnson, Mathematics; thesis: "Global
Continuous Solutions of Hyperbolic
Systems of Quasi-Linear Equations,"
Wed., June 14, Room 333A West En-
gineering, at 3:15 p.m. Chairman, J. A.
Smaller.
Foreign Visitors
The following foreign visitors can be
reached through the Foreign Visitor
Programs Office, 764-2148.
D., T. Lakdawala, director, Depart-
ment of Economics, University of Bom-
bay, India, June 13-14.
Vitor Manuel Wengorovius, lawyer,
Lisbon, Portugal, June 13-15.
Raul Espana Smith, chief, Depart-
ment of Labor Relations, Corporacion
Minera de Bolivia, La Paz, Bolivia, June
14.
Mrs. Luigia Maresca Bardelli, secre-
tary-program coordinator, American
Studies Center, Naples, Italy, June 14-
16.
Prof. da Silva Novaes, professor of
psychology and vocational guidance at

the Pontifical Catholic University, Rio
de Janeiro, Brazil, June 19-21.
Prof. Nobre Scheeffer, professor of
psychology at the Federal University in
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, June 19-21.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
Peace Corps Test-To be given this
Sat., June 17, at the downtown post
office, Main and Catherine Sts., at 1
p.m. Completed applications should be
brought to the test center, available
at the Bu'reau.
Federal Service Entrance Examination
(FSEE)-To be given Sat,, June 17, for
those persons whose applications were
filed by May 17. Report to the down-
town post office, corner of Main and
Catherine, at 9 a.m.
(Continued on Page 4)

Phone 434-0130
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A Great Folksinger
Ann Arbor High Aud.
Wed., June 14, 0:30 P.M.
Tickets available at
CAMPUS CORNERS
or at the Door
$1.50

TON IGHT--14 June--7:30 P.M.
LUGG'S PLAYERS
OEDIPUS REX
Canterbury House-50c
Tickets: Centicore Bookshop; "Plaster of Paris"
Boutique, Maynard at E. William; and at Door

COLUMBIA PICTURES and SAM SPIEGEL present
"THE HAPPENING"
3'. A HORIZONPICTURE -TECHNICOLOR

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RICHARD HAYDN j MO, x, JS"
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Mon.,thru Fri. 2 P.M.-$2.00
Sat. 1 :00-4:30-$2.00
Sun. 1:00-4:30-$2.50
All Nights 8 P.M.-$2.50
Children All Times--$11.00
Program Information 2-6264
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Mon.--Thurs.: 7-9

CINEMA I1
Presents
The
Loved One
with
JONATHAN WINTERS

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