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June 09, 1967 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1967-06-09

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TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TWO TIlE MICIIIEAN DAiLY

..........._.....
......

FILMS
)eepness of 'Loving Couples'
feeds Audience Participation

AMEND HOUSE BILL:
State Senate Votes
For Sunday Liquor

By AVIVA KEMPNER
Essentially two difficulties in
reviewing "Loving Couples" are
that both deep introspection and
several viewings are necessary.
Labeled "an adult motion picture
from Sweden," the movie offers
sophisticated entertainment for
the audience which is accustomed
to the films of Fellini and Berg-
man, or just interested in pro-
vocative drama.

The plot revolves around three
pregnant women ready to have
their babies, and the different
ways by which they reached their
common condition. The movie be-
gins with hospital scenes of the
three preparing for their deliver-
ies. These continue throughout
until the end when they give birth.
The flashbacks make up most
of the movie, and the returns to
the hospital are marvelously done.

'The Happening' Only
A Series of tMishaps

By ANN MUNSTER
"Another day when nothing is
going to happen," the lament with
which actress Martha Hyer gives
us our first glimpse of what "The
Happening" has to offer, is pro-
phetic.
The movie's only claim to uni-
queness and cinematic" merit is.
probaly the enormous degree of
prowess required to pack such a
huge amount of motion into the
film while carefully keeping out
any significant action.
In another early scene Miss
Hyer admires Sure shot (Michael
Parks) for ,being able to awaken
without remembering whether or
not he had made love to her. She
sets the scene for a foursome out
on a lark which none of them
has the joie de vivre to appre-
ciate.
Grotesque Display
.And the bodies which lie strewn
all over the set in the first scenes
are another aspect of the grotes-
que display of obscenity and ab-
surdity which fills the screen, vir-
tually uninterrupted by human
activity.
Both character and action are
so exaggerated as to be beyond
all credence. The satire is aimed at
no significant targets, and is lack-
ing in internal logic.
With the Supremes in their us-
ual good form, sounding very
much like an ensemble of pussy-.

cats, most of the actors deviate
from' their customary screen im-
ages. Anthony Quinn in particular
creates the impression that the
whole caper is giving him such a
headache.
The only consistency which the
movie displays is the complete
boredom which plagues all char-
acters at every turn and twist of
the action.
No Climax
In a sense, "The Happening"
lives up to its name. The entire
plot is composed of a series of re-
versals, leading to no ultimate cli-
max. But the thrills that this kind
of activity is supposed to produce
in its participants are quite ab-
sent, from both actors and aud-
ience.
"It was all a fake," Anthony
Quinn's lament as he discovers
that absolutely no one, not even
his mother, is willing to exert any,
effort to save his life, is an apt
description of this movie.
The film rings falsely as a take-
off on twentieth century cyni-
cism. These actors are too bored
with life to succeed as comic
characters. And Anthony Quinn
never manages to cure his head-
ache.
The four students on a caper
are so lacking in originality that
they end up following the middle-
aged gangster turned successful
executive as though he were the
Pied Piper of Hamlin.

For instance, a seduction is par-
alleled to nurses holding down
the patient.
Each woman reminisces about
her childhood and the separate
stories become connected later be-
cause they come in contact with
each other. One woman, Angela,
has been brought up and influ-
enced by her spinster aunt Petra.
But Angela does not listen to
her aunt's warning, nor follow
her aunt's own personal experi-
ence. She is a member of an
upper class Swedish family which
hardly practices what it preaches,
so she gets a "new teacher"
whose lessons she cannot easily"
forget,
The other two women are both
members of the lower class. Their
distinction as servants is constant-
ly emphasized. One of them is
willingly seduced by her "master"
and the other suffers from her
hate of the wealthy class. Their
background contains stories of
past seductions, disappointing
marriages, and the whims of the
upper class.
The movie contains a bold
treatment of many topics. All the
aspects of sexual experience from
homosexual to adulterous are ex-!
posed.
One sees the decadence of the
Swedish welathy class in the early
1900's.
The problems of rivalry between
the sexes, what is love and hap-
piness, and equality between class-
es are all raised in the movie.
The lines are often very reveal-
ing, and even sometimes over-
whelming. The symbolic use of
food (in scenes similar to "Tom
Jones"), dogs and other numerous
elements are consistent.
After seeing the movie the
meaning of the title appears
ironic. All the babies are not pro-
ducts of 'loving couples'. Maybe
the need for people,, irrespective
of their social class, to feel is the
requirment necessary for a rela-
tionship of love.
Even if the intended points are
unclear, the frank and excellent
treatment of the subject matters,
plus the excellent acting, merits
the close viewing of this movie.

warehousement or wholesalers. amendment to an elections bill
The bill must now, go back to the limiting the time for the collection
House for concurrence with Sen- and submission of recall petitions
ate amendments. to 90 days.

LANSING (A'-A heavily amend-
ed House bill providing for the
sale of liquor on Sunday was ap-
proved by the Senate Wednesday.
Senate amendments to the orig-
inal House bill provide for exten-
sion of resort liquor licenses from
10 to 12 months and exempting
packaged liquor dealers from a law
prohibiting sale of liquor within
500 feet of a church or school.
The House Bill merely prohibit-
ed the retail. sale of liquor by

-Associated Press
King Hussein of Jordan announced yesterday that his country suffered tremendous losses in the war
against Israel. Hussein, speaking at a press conference in Amman, said losses were due to Israel's air
superiority. Jordan agreed to a cease-fire Wednesday.
Syria Egypt Accept Cease-fire
Witli Israel After HugeLosses

Detroit Support
The Sunday sale proposal, sup-
ported by Detroit Democrats, is
sought by city business and con-
vention interests. The provision
would allow county boards of
supervisors to approve Sunday sale
of liquor by majority vote.
Liquor could be sold by the glass
after noon on Sunday in establish-
ments which derive 50 per cent of
their receipts from food, enter-
tainment or other services.
If a county board refused tloj
act on the issue, a referendum
could be forced by petition of 10
per cent of the county voters.
No School Board Change
In other action, the Senate re-
fused to concur in a House
amendment to a Senate education
bill which would have required
Detroit School Board members to
be elected by district rather than
at-large.
It was the second unsucessful
attempt by Rep. James Del Rio
(D-Detroit), to change the pres-
ent Detroit School Board setup.

There is no time limit on sub-
mission of such petitions at pres-
ent.
The House had proposed the
recall provision become effective
July 1.
Meddle in Recall
Opponents objected that imme-
diate effect at this time would
"meddle with" recall petitions now
being gathered in Detroit to recall.
Mayor Jerome Cavanagh.
The Senate approved a bill
which would withhold state aid
money to schools who do not cer-
tify that th1y have completed 180
days of instruction per school
year.
The bill's backers saw it as a
method of warning teachers and
school boards that prolonged
strikes might throw local district
finances into chaos, assuming the
lost day could not be made up.
The House passed a bill pro-
viding for arbitration of highway
route disputes and agreed with the
Senate version of a bill to make
glue sniffing a misdemeanor.

An earlier try, also tacked on
to an education bill, was killed ir
Senate committee.
Del Rio's latest try was in the
form of an amendment to a minor
education bill on trainee centers.
Conference Committee
Only three Senators voted for
the amendment while 34 opposed
it, thus sending the measure to
conference committee.
The Senate also refused to give
immediate effect to a House

. od
9k

(Continued from Page 1) the early morning newscast, the
to the Jordan River. It could also cease-fire announcement came as
make Israel vulnerable once more a bitter disappointment. They had
in a historic battle area where been led to believe the Egyptian
three wars have been waged in army had absorbed the Israeli
19 years. onslaught and confidently expect-
T sc ied word that their forces were
The news of the cease-fire was on the counteroffensive.
broken to the Egyptian people1
after a series of brief radio com- This means we have shed our
mentaries that seemed to be cau- blood in vain," said one Egyptian.
tiously preparing the country for "It settled nothing. It only put
the announcement. off a final decision for a few
Soon after Egypt's acceptance more years.'
of the cease-fire, the high military Te yes
command reported Egyptian forces The terse announcement of
had fought against Israel a battle Egypt's agreement at an emer-
"unprecedented in its ferocious- gency session of the UN Security
ness" and that fighting was still Council caught all members by
going on on all fronts. surprise-most of all the Soviet
"Arab determination in the face Union, the avowed champion - of
of the most wicked forces of the the Arabs in the Arab-Israeli con-
age will forever remain as a flict.
symbol," said one announcer. It came as Soviet Ambassador
B h n s oo Nikolai T. Fedorenko proposed
But the tone was one of sorrow that the council order a halt to
rather than bombast.
For the Egyptians who hear d I

all military activities and a troop
pullback.
Secretary-General U Thant read
a message from Egyptian Ambas-
sador Mohamed Awab el-Kony de-
claring that it had accepted 'the
two calls by the council for a
cease-fire "on the condition that
the other party cease to fire."
There was no reference to with-
drawal of troops.
Abba Eban, Israeli foreign min-
ister, told the council his country
welcomed the Egyptian accept-
ance. He added that with this de-
velopment the council could cele-
brate the approaching realization
of a halt to the fighting.
U.S. Ambassador Arthur J.
Goldberg said his government was
pleased at the Egyptian action. He
expressed hope it would lead to an
end to all acts of war and set the
stage for permanent peace in the
Middle East.

I r

. MICHIGAN

NOW *
D IAL 5-6290

V

A ,:.,X'AS'.A'k"rS'-- vs. .....................................................
DAILYOFFICI'AL BULLETIN

_.

r _rMlk- IM.41- nMnls/ R 11s44ri fa fstf t

The Daily Official Bulletini an
official publicatiorn of the Univer :
sity of Micnigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRi'TTEN form to
Roiom 3564 Administration bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Satarday and Sunday. General*
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organistiop notices are not
accepted for pubieation. For more
information call 264-Pl0.
FRIDAY, JUNE 9
Day Calendar
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar-"The Management of Managers
No. 31": 146 Business Administration,
8 a.m. to 5 p.m., and 7 to 9 p.m.
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar - "Advanced Employment Inter-
viewing Workshop": Michigan Union,
8:30 a.m. to 3:15 p.m."'
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar--"Men, Management and Moti-
vation Michigan Union, 8:3 a.m. to
3:15 p.m.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only. Forms are available in
Room 1311 SAB.
Folk Dance Club (WAA), Folk dance
with instruction open to everyone, Fri.,
June 9, 8-11 p.m., Barbour Gym.

Astronomical Colloquium: Fri,, June
9, 4 p.m., Room, 807 Physics-Astronomy
Bldg. Dr. P. G. Mezger, National Radio
Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville,
Va., will speak on "Recombination Line
and Continuum Radio Observations of
Galactic H II Regions." ,
Cinema Guild - "The Incredible
Shrinking Man": Architecture Aud., 7
and 9:05 p.m.
General Notices
Doctoral Examination for Archibald
Wickeramaraja Singham, Political Sci-
ence; thesis: The Colonial Political
System: A Case Study of Political Con-
flict in a British Colony," Fri, June
9, 4th Floor. Haven Hall, Political Sci-
ence Lounge, at 9:30 a.m. Chairman,
S. J. Eldersveld.
Doctoral Examination for John Vance
Israel, Human Genetics; thesis: "The
In Vitro Assembly of Phage P22 and its
Application to the Study of Prophage
Induction," Fri., June 9, Room M59141
Buhl Bldg. at 1:30 p.m. Co-Chairmen,
Myron Levine and H. 0. Smith.I

Ob t r S tinC&5 TO.'B' ask." St.,.lmp W

vject zorung as ,° rx., dune .a
Room 534 University Elementary School,
at 2 p.m. Chairman, J. A. Dunn.
Doctoral Examination for Marshall
August Wakat, Jr., Chemistry; thesis:
"Studies of Fission-Product 152Pm and
152Nd," Sat.. June 10, Room 3005 Chem-
istry, at 9 a.m. Chairman, H. C. Griffin.
Doctoral Examination for John
Matthew Potter, English Language &
Literature; thesis: "Andrew Marvell's
Latin Poetry," Sat., June 10. Austin
Warren's residence, 848 E. University,
at 9:15 a.m. Chairman, Austin Warren.
Student Government Council Approval
of the following student sponsored
events becomes effective 24 hours after
the publicatior. of this notice. All pub-
licity for these events must be with-
neld until the approval has become ef-
fective.
Approval request forms for student
sponsored events are available in Room
1011 of the SAB,
Hillel Foundation, Fishbowl table,
June 9, 12 and 13. 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Fish-
bowl.
Placement

majors or possibly Liberal Arts grads.
Age 22-27. Can train in Grand Rapids,
Detroit or Flint
Irving Schwartz Institute for Chil-
dren and Youth, Phila., Pa., 19131 -
Child Psychotherapist. MA-PhD oppor.
for professional in psych., social work,
child devel. or other mental health
profession. In-service trng. and supv.
in all phases of work.
Anchor Hocking Glass Corp.. Lancas-
ter, Ohio - Openings incl. Asst. Data
Processing. Mgr., Engineers for Res.
and Devel, Industrial Engr. for Hfg.
area.dVarying amounts of exper. re-
quired.
Storer Broadcasting Co (Channel 2,
WJBK-TV), Detroit, Mich. - Creative
copywriter within house adv. agency.
Work with Promotion Production Mgr.
and Art Director, Can gain exper. in
other areas also. 2-3 yrs. exper, re-
quired in copywriting.
Office of Economic Opportunity,
Wash., D.C.-Programs for summer vol-
unteers, particularly in Head Start
projects Booklet available at Bureauj
which describes opportunities presently
available.
For further information please call1
764-7460, General Division, Bureau of
Appointments, 3200 SAB.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
212 SAS-
Summer Placement Service Hours -
1-5 p.m., Monday-Friday, 212 SAB, Low=
er Level.

CINEMA II
presents
ALEC GUINNESS'
THE HbRSE'S
MOUTH
TECHNICOLOR
"A triumph! A truly incredible cast of well-nigh
flawless British players assist Mr. Guinness."
-Crowther, N.Y. TIMES
"The maddest comedy of the year; but more than
that, a masterly serio-comic rhapsody on art,,
culture society, and genius."
-N.Y. HERALD TRIBUNE
"Responsible!"
-Wilde, THE PROJECTIONARY'S LAMENT
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY,7 and 9:15 P.M.
AU D. A, Angell Hall 50c

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Adults $2.50 at 1:00 and 4:30
Adults $2.00
Matinees Monday Matinees Sunday
through Friday 2 p.m. at 1:00 and 4:30
Adults $2.00 Adults $2.50
Children $1.00 at all times

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GET OUTOF SHOWN AT 8:3
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NOT ALL LOVE AFFAIRS HAPPEN BETWEEN MAN AND WOMAN..

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