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June 08, 1967 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1967-06-08

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PAGE TWO

THE MICA MAN DAILY

THURSDAY, JUNE S, 1967

PAGE TWO TIlE MICIIJfAN DAILY THURSDAY, JUNE 8,1967

GOP VICTORY:
Romney Helps Serotkin
Win Seat in StateHouse

Arab Refugee Dispute Lingers

By WILLIAM L. RYAN
By The Associated Press;
Until the problem of the Arab
refugees from Israel is solved, the
Middle East will remain politically3
explosive and a danger to world!
peace. But the problem seems ut-

return to their former homes. It
failed.
The third way was war. It, too,
has failed so far-with the Arabs
not strong enough to accomplish
a solution by means of battle.
Slogan Unites Arabs

MOUNT CLEMENS (OP)-For the
second time in two weeks, a Re-
publican has swept his way to a
seat in the Michigan House, riding
the crest of Gov. George Romney's
popularity.
David Serotkin Tuesday swamp-
ed Democrat Victor Steeh by an
unofficial 5,879 to 4,635 votes in
their race to represent the state's
75th legislative district at Mount
Clemens.
The victory gave Republicans a
56-54 margin the House, consider-
ably enhancing Romney's chances
of pushing through a controversial
state tax reform program.
Presidential Candidate
Romney's ability to swing fiscal
reform through the Michigan
Legislature is considered a prime
factor in party selection of a pres-
idential candidate next year.
A Republican loss would have
created a 55-55 deadlock in the
Michigan House of Representa-
tives, giving the Democrats room
to maneuver on a Senate-approved
tax program which is before the
House.
A jubilant Serotkin hailed Rom-
ney as the architect of his success.
'Deeply Grateful'
"I'm deeply grateful to the gov-
ernor for his vigorous campaign-
ing on my behalf," he said, claim-
ing victory well before all the re-
turns were in.
"He went from door to door
with me last Saturday. He al-
lowed my organization to send
campaign leaflets over his sig-
nature. He even taped a phone
message for me.
"I support Romney's tax reform
program, and I'll probably vote for
it," Serotkin said.
He said Romney contributed
both to the 1,224-vote margin of
victory and the size of the voter
turnout.
Some 35 per cent of the dis-

trict's 30,000 voters marched to the
polls.
Steeh denied that Romney's
hand turned the election.
"Democrats just don't vote in
special elections," lie stated.
"We've got to get the Democrats
off their haunches and into the
voting booths, just like the Repub-
licans," he said.
Licata Victory
Two weeks ago, Republican An-
thony J. Licata broke a 54-54 split
in the House by defeating young
James P. Hoffa, son of the im-
prisoned Teamsters Union presi-
dent, in their fight for Detroit's
19th District seat.
Licata credited Romney's cam-
paigning as a major factor in the
upse victory over a Democratic
candidate running in a tradition-
ally Democratic fortress and with
strong union backing.
Romney said he was deeply
gratified by Serotkin's victory.
"In elccting Serotkin and Licata
the voters have indicated their
support of this administration and
its programs," he said.
Vote in Cycles
"It's a sweet victory," Serotkin
smiled. "The people voted for me
because I support the governor's
program. It shows Romney's at-
traction to the people, of Michi-
gan."
"But it seems that politics run
in cycles," said House Democratic
leader William Ryan.
"The Republicans are in an up
cycle right now. We think that
won't last too long as the voters
continue to observe the results."
Republican Deaths
The seats won by Serotkin and
Licata were left vacant by the
recent deaths of Rep. James Nun-
neley, a Republican, and former
House. Minority Leader Joseph
Kowalski, a Democrat.
Steeh served the Mount (Clemens

district for one term until he was
defeated by Nunneley in 1966.
Romney, who has yet to lose an
election, demonstrated his vote-
pulling strength when he won re-
election in 1966, sweeping U.S.
Sen. Robert P. Griffin (R-Mich),
to victory over former Gov, G.
Mennen Williams, along with five
GOP congressmen.
Romney alwo won election in
1964, despite President Johnson's
Democratic landslide.

terly insoluble. The slogan uniting all Arabs
For almost 20 years, a quest against Israel is a cry for "liber-
for a solution has been going ating the Arab homeland." Its
on. Neutrals close to Middle East emotional appeal, far from abat-
problems saw three basic ways to ing over two decades, has become
approach the problem of establish- stronger all the times a parent
ing stability, passes the word to child.
One was to seek a method to re- The problem was created at the
settle the refugees. It failed. An- outset of the Palestine war of
other was to seek political settle- 1948-49 when Jewish troops,
ment between Israel and the Arab storming through Arab villages,
nations so some refugees could expelled the inhabitants and sent

Governor, Party Leaders Seek
Republi can Support for Tax Bi

them fleeing behind the protection
of Arab lines.
Hundreds of thousands were
displaced this way. Nobody knows
the exact figure. Over the years
their number has grown by the
natural process. Today, by best
estimates, perhaps a few more
than a million persons claim the
status of refugees.
Live in Slums
They have lived in slums in the
outskirts of cities in Lebanon,
Syria and Jordan and in the Gaza
Strip which Egypt occupied on Is-
rael's southwest Mediterranean
coast after the war.
They were a constant source of
political ferment, an easy prey
to pan-Arab agitation stirred up
by ,the followers of Egypt's Presi-
dent Gamal Abdel Nasser.
Only some of the families who
fled before the Israeli troops even-
tually wound up in other Arab
countries. Most clung tenaciously
to their status as refugee.
They said that to do otherwise
would be to imply forfeiting their
right to return to their former
homes.
For the little kingdom of Jor-
dan, they became a grave problem.
Palestinians feel themselves su-
perior, intellectually and other-
wise, to the Bedouins who hail
from the east side of the Jordan
River and who made up the tiny
never-never land of Transjordan
before 1950.
Annexes Palestine Territory
In that year, TransJordan's
King Abdullah annexed Palestine
territory on the west side of the
river fronting on Israel. By doing
so he tripled the country's popula-

Only a third of Jordan's refu-
gees lived in camps. Others lived'
in tin shacks, rock huts, some in
no homes at all, just carrying
about their worldly goods in boxes,
sleeping and eating wherever they
could.
The Jordanian government could
not ignore them. It gave them
a vote, places in the Cabinet and
in the legislature.
In Lebanon and Syria the refu-
gees live in mud huts or concrete
block shacks, and brood constant-
ly about their former homeland.
In the Gaza Strip, as elsewhere,
the refugees form a pool for the

tion and left a source of constant recruitment of the commandos
headache for the future king of who infiltrate Israel and attack,
Jordan. prompting Israel to retaliation.
In the capital, Amman, refugees While Israel feels itself stronger
were crowded into the Mahajarin than all the Arabs combined, there
Souk, a hotbed of riot, most of seems no prospect of persuading
them hating the king,: the Israelis to make concessions on

the refugee problem.
Israel said the Arabs fled their
homes of their own accord and
thus are not Israel's responsibility.
The Arabs say they were driven
out by conquest.
Israel has never moved to nego-
tiate on the question of repatri-
ating Arabs. The Arabs steadfastly
refuse to give up their claims to
lands the Jews inhabit.
The Arabs, buiding up for the
new war, did so on the claim that
they were going to restore their
brethren to their rights. It is a
battlecry no Arab ruler dares to
resist.

Brazil May Extradite
'Former Nazi to Trial

Israel Reaches Cease-Fire
With Jordan in Middle East,

LANSING (A) - With their tax
program in position for a final
vote, House Republican leaders
have enlisted Gov. George Rom-
ney's aid in their search for votes
to pass it.
House Republicans once again
demonstrated they have the party
discipline to do everything to a
tax program but actually pass it.
Without a single defection they
pushed through their amendments
to a Senate passed plan and put
the whole package in position for
final passage Tuesday.
Personal Plea
Overshadowing this procedural
unity was the fact that despite
personal pleas from Gov. Romney,
a small group of six Republicans
who voted "no" the last time a
package was voted on in the
House were refusing to come out
for the new program.
One reluctant Republic a n
emerged from a 25-minute session
in Romney's office Tuesday and
said the governor had suggested
Republicans might repay his sup-
port for the fiscal package with
votes for his views on court re-
organization.
That GOP member, Rep. Donald
Holbrook of Clare, said he still
didn't intend to vote for the tax
program.
Vote This Week.
Speaker Robert Waldron, care-
fully counting his votes, said he
hoped for a decision this week on
the Republican-drafted package
and its controversial state income
tax.
He said he had "over 50" of the
55 votes needed to pass the bills.
He declined to comment on
whether he thought any Demo-
crats would favor it.
The House adopted a substitute
for the Senate's income tax bill-
causing Democratic chief William
Ryan to warn it would kill tax re-
form for the year if the new bill
passed.
The program the GOP is cur-
rently pushing calls for a state
income tax of 2%2 per cent on
individuals with a $600 per person,
exemption, 5 per cent on corpora-

tions and 7 per cent on financial
institutions.
About $40 million or revenues
from one fourth of one per cent of
the personal income tax levy
would be distributed to cities, vil-
lages and townships on a popula-
tion basis, with the same amount
going to counties.
Cigaret taxes would be hiked by
3 cents per pack.
School and county property tax-
es would be cut by 14 per cent,
the business activities tax would
be repealed and the intangibles
tax exemptions raised to $100 per
person.

The House approach calls for
the passage of two sets of almost
identical tax bills, one to go into
effect until Dec. 31, 1969 and the
other to be submitted to a popular
referendum at the general elec-
tion in 1968.
The results of the 1968 referen-
dum would determine whether the
program stayed in effect, or a new
program would be prepared.
The temporary program would
contain an appropriation of $3
million and would be deemed a bill
to meet a budget deficiency, so
that a petition campaign could not
keep it from going into effect.

HOUSE VOTE NEXT:
Senate Passes Johnson Plan
' To Avert June- 19 Rail Strike

i

dgrf Civil Court on charge
ming from his command
Treblinka death camp in
between August 1942 and
1943 as well as 13 specific
charges.
Austria and Poland, as
West G e r m a n y, had
Stangl's extradition.
14-Judge Panel

s stem-
of the:
Poland7
Augusti
murdera
well as
sought

BRASILIA, Brazil (P-Brazil's
Supreme Court voted unanimously
yesterday to extradite Franz Paul
Stangl to West Germany for trial
on crimes he is accused of com-
mitting while a Nazi prison camp
commandant.
But the 13 judges who voted to
honor West Germany's request at-
tached two conditions: that a pos-
sible life prison sentence be com-
muted to a lesser sentence and
that the Germans agree to extra-
dite Stangl subsequently to Aus-
tria for trial there.
Brazilian authorities said Stangl
would be turned over to Duessel-

(Continued from Page 1)
senior Egyptian government'
spokesman declared, "Egypt will
fight on."
His terse comment came in re-
spopse to a request put to the Min-
istry of Information for Egypt's
reaction to the UN bid to lend the
war between Israel and the Arabs.
Cairo radio continued to blare
out martial music and commen-
taries urging the Arabs to throw
themselves unsparingly into the
struggle.
r Algiers radio said last night
that all Arab countries involved
in the fight against Israel have,
refused to accept the cease-fire or-
der.
The broadcast apparently refer-
red to the original cease-fire call
by the Security Council on Tues-
day night and no mention was
made of the second resolution
adopted yesterday.

to break diplomatic relations with
Israel if the Israelis did not heed
the United Nations Security Coun-
cil's call for a cease-fire.
The official news agency Tass
carried a government statement
saying Israel was "grossly and
demonstrably" ignoring the coun-
cil's resolution adopted Tuesday
night. It did not mention that
Egypt, Syria and Iraq have an-
nounced rejection-of the cease-fire
appeal.
The Soviet Union continued to
play down thinly veiled Arab re-
quests for direct help, in line with
what has been a cautious public
attitude by the Kremlin toward
the war.
AdvancingI

WASHINGTON (91) - Senate
passage yesterday moved to the
House the fight over Presidentl
Johnson's plan to head off a June
19 nationwide railroad strike.
The House Commerce Commit-j
tee completed hearings on the
President's proposal and scheduled
closed discussions today to start
wrapping up its version.
The goal is to get the resolution
to Johnson before the June 19
deadline, and congressional lead-
ers assured him at the White
House yesterday they could do
this.
70 to 15 Vote
The Senate passed the legisla-
tion 70 to 15 after knocking down
solidly the persistent efforts by
Sens. Ralph Yarborough (D-Tex.)
and Edward M. Kennedy (D-
Mass.) to make the- plan more4
acceptable to the six shop craft
unions.
They had lost out in committee
action on the bill earlier this week.k
Under Johnson's p 1 a n, the
strike, suspended by congressional
action twice before, would be
blocked for another 90 days to

lost 59 to 23, would have permit-
ted the government to seize 10 per
cent of the railroads' profits dur-
ing the time the government-im-
posed settlement was in effect.
Yarborough, Kennedy and some
other Democratic senators argued
that the resolution submitted by
Johnson is weighted on the side
of management. Their proposals,
they said, were aimed at putting
equal pressure on both sides to
reach a settlement.
teKennedy argued that the Presi-
dent's resolution takes away the
right to strike and confronts the
77-
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Yarborough's

proposal, which

employes with a government-de-
creed settlement without asking
comparable sacrifice from the rail-
roads.
But Sen. Wayne Morse (D-Ore.)
insisted the bill is equitable to
both sides and disputed claims it
is compulsory arbitration.
That panel recommended a six
per cent general wage increase for
shop employes, compared to a five
per cent increase which most
other rail workers have received,
plus wage differentials of 15 cents
an hour in three steps for workers
with extra skills.

Brazil's public prosecutor recom-
mended-to the 14-judge panel that
Austria's request be honored. One
of the judges did not vote.
Prosecutor H a r o 1 d o Valadao
ruled May 24 that Austria's and
West Germany's claims werehvalid
with respect to Stangl, who was;
arrested last February in San
Paulo where he had been working
at an auto plant.
Valadao said Poland, which also
wanted to try Stangl, had failed
to show any judiciary action had

been taken in the case, and there-
fore the Brazilian statute of lim-
itations had run out 20 years after
the alleged crimes, were com-
mitted.
Stangl. is accused of murdering
prisoners as the _ World War
II commander of extermination
campus at Sobidor and Trebinka.
He has been in custody at a
secret location in Brazilia.
He was reported to have been
discovered after a former comrade
reported his whereabouts, to Si-
mon Wiesenthal, head of the Jew-
ish Documentation Center in
Vienna, Austria.
Paid $7,000
Wiesenthal has said he paid the
informant $7,000 - about one
penny for each person believed to
have been killed at Treblinka.
Valadao said if Stangl is extra-
dited, the receiving country would
have to guarantee to Brazil that
he will not be executed.
The Brazilian constitution pro-
hibits extradition in death penalty
cases.
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The radio said the Arab attitude
was influenced by these considera-
tions :
-The Arabs are still far from (Continued from Page 1)
throwing the full weight of their and the Suez Canal. Israel claim-
forces into the battle. Iraqi, Alger- ed it was captured Tuesday.
ian, Moroccan, Tunisian, Leban- While admitting reverses in the
ese, Sudanese and Saudi Arabian ie aitn r ss the
forces have not gone into action; Sinai, Egyptian commentators
Egypt still has not committed the claimed this was only their first
bulk of its troops. line of defense and the war now
-Movement of Israeli forces on- was entering its second stage.
to Arab soil leads to the disper- They expressed confidence that
sion of these forces so they can reinforcements from other Arab
be attacked on different fronts countries - particularly Algeria
by Arab armies. and Iraq - will turn the tables
-Israel cannot sustain a long on the advancing Israelis.
military effort that absorbs half The semiofficial newspaper Al
its active population. Ahram said squadrons of Algerian
" Iraq also declared it refus- MIG jets arrived in Egypt yester-
ed to accept the UN Security day, together with five Moroccan
Council's appeal. transport aircraft bringing the
The refusal came in a state- vanguard of the Moroccan army.
ment proclaimed by the state min- Cairo
ister for palace affairs, Ismail Fear gripped Cairo and some
Kerallah, who said Iraq would Egyptian troops were reported
continue its firm stand in backing digging in along the valley of the
the Arabs. ,Nile 40 miles west of the Suez
On other diplomatic fronts: Canal
Washington officials confirmed
seven countries - Egypt, Syria, The arrival of a trainload of
Iraq, YSemen, Algeria, Sudan and Israeli prisoners of war Wednes-
Mauritania-have notified the day night gaverthe people of Cairo
United States they are breaking a boost to their sagging morale.
relations. Lebanon said it is end- As the Israelis were transferred
ing ambassadorial-level relations from the train to prison trucks, a
with the United States. mob of several thousand Arabs
The Soviet Union threatened surged around the station. The
"BOLD IN RESENTING
FACETS OF AMOUR, ILLICIT

Jeru

Gel A. &u l l ii

If no voluntary settlement re-

sulted in that period, the board
Nasser government claimed 3,500 could impose its own settlement
prisoners were being brought back ;terms, which would continue in
from the battle zone. effect until Jan. 1, 1969 unless the

ALSO [
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SHOWN AT COLOR:
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Israeli troops captured the cen-
ter of Jordanian Jerusalem in a
battle ton at mid-morning and
the high command announced
Bethlehem also fell in the sweep
against Jordan's holdings west of
the Jordan River and the Dead
Sea.
Shooting persisted, however, in
the Jordanian sector of the Arab
front.
The heavy fighting had lasted
from 5 a.m. to mid-morning.
Jordanian artillery batteries that
had rained shells into the Israeli
sector for two days were silenced.
By official accounting Tuesday,
the Jordanians had killed 15 Is-
raeli civilians and wounded 500.

parties reach agreement before
that.
Kennedy's proposal for the gov-
ernment to seize the railroads
during the 90-day period was
beaten 64 to 22. During this per-
iod, the railroads would have lost
their profits and the unions would
have lost the right to retroactivity,
in any wage increases.
However, the board could have
restored either the profits or wage
retroactivity, or both, dependinga
on its view of the good faith of
the parties in the bargaining dur-
ing the 90 days.

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