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May 25, 1967 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1967-05-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PALE SIB

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I'A0 SiX TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY

Cincinnati
Gets Final
AFL Team
By The Associated Press
NEW YORK - Cincinnati was
awarded the 10th franchise in the
American Footbagll League yester-
day and will begin play in the
1968 season.
Five different groups are seek-
ing the ownership of the fran-
chise, said Pete Rozelle, commis-
sioner of both the AFL and the
National Football League. Rozelle
said the franchise owner may not
be selected for at least two weeks.
There are two major groups in-
volved. The one believed to have
the inside track is headed by Paul
Brown, former coach and general
manager of the Cleveland Browns
of the NFL.
The other known contending
groupis headed by John Wiethe,
a former guard of the Detroit
Lions in the NFL and a one-time
basketball coach at the University
of Cincinnati.
Although no price was announc-
ed, it is estimated that the cost
of the franchise, including the
stocking of players drafted from
other clubs, will approximate $8.5
million.
Other clubs in the AFL will
provide the players for the Cin-
cinnati team but the money will
go to the NFL as part of the
price paid for the merger of the
two rival leagues a year ago.
The other teams in the AFL are
Boston, Buffalo, Kansas City, New
York, Houston, Miami, San Diego,
Oakland and Denver.
Woodard said that the method
of stocking the new team hadn't
been discussed. He added, however,
that it is likely to be the same
program used for the Miami Dol-
phins. In that one, each of the
other eight AFL teams made four
players each available after freez-
ing a number of veterans.

Enthusiasm Low For

Major Leat ic St iiigs

I

AMERICAN LEAGUE

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Chicago
Detroit
Boston
Baltimore

w
22
21
18
17

L
21
13
17
17

Put.
.667
.618
.514
.500

GB
I2x.
St.

Cincinnati
St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Atlanta

w
27
20
20
20

L
13
13
15
16

Pet. GB
.670 -
.606 31
.571 41.
.556 5

-Associated Press
CHICAGO WHITE SOX catcher, Gerry McNertney had to sprawl under the waiting glove of Min-
nesota Twins' first baseman Herman Killebrew but avoided being picked off in the fourth inning of
yesterday's game. The throw came late from Twin s' pitcher Dean Chance.
ox Gain Game on Tiers;
ResSplit Pi ith Cubs

By The Associated Press
Tommy McCraw drove in eight
runs with three home runs and
paced the Chicago White Sox to
a 14-1 rout of the Minnesota
Twins yesterday.
The win gave the Sox a 1%/
game cushion in the American
League pennant race as the Bos-
ton Red Sox rolled over the De-
troit Tigers, 1-0.
In the National League, it was
a split for the league leading Cin-
cinnati Reds as they took their.

i
3t
f#
t
t

The Pinch Hitter
the mini-f-aze . . .
and the mini-fraze
By HOWARD KOHN and DAVE WEIR,
SIGNS OF the times.
The big thing in comedy used to be the dialogue. You know,
the take-offs on Bill Cosby:
"Here it is, the flip of the cin. OK, it's heads. The Tigers win the
toss.
OK, the Tigers get their choice. They'll take all the home run
hitters and the best starting pitchers. The rest of you, except the
Yankess, get the relievers."
"The Yankees get Ralph Houk."
BUT WITH Marshall McLuhan and the trend for brevity, the
one-line graffiti stoppers-like "The United States has the answer,
what was the question?"-are the new thing.
Twiggy is a squeeze play.

i
f

first game of a twin bill 4-3 on this season and his 505th major
Tony Perez's two-run homer in league four-bagger, placing him
the sixth inning. They dropped the just six behind the late Mel Ott.
second game by the same score, Roberto Clemente's homer and
4-3, when Adolpho Phillips beat Donn Clendenon's sacrifice fly in
a throw to the 'plate on a fielders the eighth inning helped the Pitts-
choice play in the ninth inning, burgh Pirates to a comeback 7-4
McCraw belted his first homer victory over the Houston Astros.
off Dean Chance, Minnesota's The Astros were ahead 3-0 at
starting pitcher, with one on in the end of five as rookie Don
the fourth inning. His second came Wilson was cruising along with a
off Chance with two on in the one-hitter. Then his troubles be-
seventh. His third came off reliev- gan.
er Jim Kaat with two on in the Leon Wagner's two-run homer
ninth. paced a Cleveland attack that
The defeat ended Chance's sev- powered the Indians to a,,9-1 vic-
en-game winning streak for the tory over Washington.
Twins. I a h eaos it
Meanwhile, in Chicago, the Cubs It was the Senators fifth
got hot in the first inning of straight loss.
the second game, scoring twice Wagner's fourth inning homer,
when Banks doubled home two his fifth, climaxed a two-inning,
men. nine-hit drive against three
The Reds tied it in the third Washington pitchers.
on Pete Rose's two-run homer and The Indians' four runs in the
went ahead in the fifth when Rose third came on a double by Joe
doubled home Vada Pinson. Azcue and singles by Pedro Gon-
Sammy Ellis picked up his fifth zales, Luis Tiant and Larry Brown,
victory against two defeats in the ' an error by Bob Saverine and a
opener in which Cincinnati came wild pitch.
from behind to tie the game at Left-hander Denny Lemaster
2-2stopped St. Louis on one hit and
ury doubled ithbecauseasloa d- Felipe Alou belted a two-run home
ed o run as the Atlanta Braves de-
New York's Al Downing allow- feated the Cardinals 2-0.
ed two hits, struck out 13 and I Lou Brock's single with one out
beat the Baltimore Orioles 2-0 on in the third inning was the lone

TheAssoiatedPressuieveiand171.05 Chicago196.435
By Tie Associated Press outfield, over 100 feet from the Kansas City 17 18 .486 6 San Francisco 20 17 .541 5
PITTSBURGH Pa. - A monthIchoice seats around home plate. Minnesota 16 18 .471 6' Los Angeles 16 21 .432 91
r A S There are no seats in baseball's New York 15 19 .441 7, Philadelphia 15 20 .429 9
into The Great American Soccer! California 16 22 .421 81' New York 11 22 .333 1 -
left and center field sair territory. Washington 14 21 *400 9 Houston 12 27 .308 l4%
Experiment, the results are less' Then there are the prices.YETRA'RSUTYSER YSRSLS
than a dazzling success in Pitts- TYESTERDAYS RESULTS Y~sTERDAY's RESULTS
burgh despite a built-in audience : They're $5 and $4 for the choice hicago 14 Inest Cincinnati 4-3, Chicago 3-4
and one of the hottest teams in NBseats and $2.50 for general admis- ew York 2, Baltimore 0Los Angeles 8, New York 2
the country.. sin. Boston 1, Detroit 0 Pitasnburgh 7, Louison 4
The Pittsburgh ' Phantoms for ! "The price is too high," said Only games scheduleSan Francisco at Philadelphia(cold)
I eeMrvc.H' ertr-TODAY'S GAME a Facso tPildlha-(od
example, lead the National Pro- Pete Marovich. He's secretary- Minnesota at Kansas City (n) TODAY'S GAMES
fessional Soccer League's Eastern treasurer of the WQEST Penn Soc- Boston at Detroit (n) Cincinnati at Chicago
Division with four straight vic- cer League, and amateur group shngt at eveland (1) t
tories. But they drew only 4,094 in which has been playing for years
their last two home games. They've in the mill towns around Pitts-
had 15,751 at all four. burgh and provides the Phantoms
Club President Peter H. Block with a ready-made, hard-core fol-
desn't believe this necessarily lowing.
makes soccer a flop. Block is optimistic. "He said
"I think the reason is the when we started it would take
weather's been so terrible," he three or four years to get started,"
said. "And I certainly don't think he said. "It's going to take awhile."
it's going to stay like this." But asked.if the Phantoms could
Postponements were one prob- survive -that long with present ,
lem, another is the design of base- attendance, he replied, "I don't
ball stadiums, which don't permit think anybody could take 1,300 or
the best viewing. 1,400 each game for a whole sea-
The soccer field runs across the son."
Back to class?
1§1
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.: for. men an. wome
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and her styling, and you have Bass Sunjuns - the most
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sun-token free with every pair.
GO HONDA!1_
Just the ticket for campus traffic, crowded
parking lots or just plain fun. And, instead of
walking her to class, you can ride her to class!
'Hondas are more fun than a barrel of coeds.
'See all the Honda models (there's one just
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tlerisiti, St. (
DO WNTOWN yQ -;
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Returning Students § 17 Nickels Arcade-Ann Arbor, Mich.
Note: We Moved in May

0

Jim Ryun is the Fugitive.
* * *
Barry Goldwater invented Chinese Checkers.
Mario Andretti is a rabbi.
George Wallace was cut by the Harlem Globetrotters.
* *
Expo1 '67 is a paddleball tournament.
Art Buchwald is a hot dog.

Mickey Mantle's third inning
home run
Mantle'sopposite field homer,
off left hander Steve Barber,
cleared the right field fence just
above the glove of a leaping Frank
Robinson. Horace Clarke, who
reached base on a force out, scor-
ed on the two-out blow.
The run was No. 9 for Mantle

Cardinal hit. Phil Gagliano then
walked, but Lemaster got Curt{
Flood and Orlando Cepeda to fly
out.
Lemaster, 4-1, struggled with
his control in the early innings,
walking two Cardinals in the first
inning but struck out third base-
man Ed Spiezio to nullify that
threat.

tvOLtw aN OrAME'V A.,Tmt,

r

Vince Lombardi works in a zoo,
Walt Alston is alive but wants to be traded.
The United Nations is arbitrating the NCAA-AAU feud.
* * *
Craig Dill is a basketball player.
Mayo Smith is a computer.
Madison Square Garden is a racist.

The Daily Sports Staff is alive-it
ivolved.

just doesn't want to get

COVERT, CLA
HIGHLIGHT T
CHARTER CL
DACRON®-W(
Shades of something
earth tones of covert
a clean, crisp look to
The model shown he
Charter Club three-1
shoulder, center veil
trousers. The fabric's
wrinkle-resistant, Du
in a light clay shade.
An exceptionally go
summer suit for just

0
Y, AND PUTTY TONES
'HE LIGHT LOOK IN OUR
UB TRADITIONAL
OOL TROPICALS
handsome: light-toned
, clay and putty-adding «
tradional suitings.
re is our classic t
button, with natural
, slimly-cut plain-front
s a natural: a lightw eight, r s t c
lcro--worsted tropical,
d-lookigi
$ 54.0. Others to $110.
I ..........
4 ji 5
D STORE OPEN
G TO 9 P.M.
W, ANN ARBOR-.. ,
2
. . . : . .
Sq,

Pee Wee Reese

Dill Signs
Craig Dill, co-captain of the
Wolverine's 1966-67 basketball
team, has signed to play with In-
diana in the American Basketball
Association.
Dill was named most valuable,
player on the squad after lead-
ing in scoring with an average of
19.6 points.

KEEP AHEAD
OF YOUR HAIR
* NO WAITING
f 8 BARBERS
* OPEN 6 DAYS
The Dascola Barbers
Near the Michigan Theatre

Tomorrow it'll take the kids
to the orthodontist.
During a camping weekend, the Campmobile is
a little house in the woods.
It has an insulated, wood-paneled interior. With
enough room to sleep 4 (2 adults, 2 kids). And
enough closets and cabinets to hold enough to
hold your family for weeks.
It even has a kitchen sink. An icebox. And privacy.
(The Campmobile has curtains that draw over
every window and even wrap around the wind-
shield.)
Butonce you break camp, all the homey things
inside the Campmobile fold away. So you can use
it all the ways you'd use a VW Station Wagon. For
commuting. Shopping.Taxiing the kids around. Or,
taking a pet to the vet.
(And like any VW wagon, it holds almost twice'
as much as ordinary wagons.)
Actually, you'll probably wind up using the
Camomobile more in the city as a station wagon

OUR ARBORLANI
EVERY EVENIN
3663 WASHTENAV

i

MWA

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