100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 15, 1960 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1960-07-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'our Lead Western Open Golf

By DAVE DILES
Associated Press Sports Writer
DETROIT (W--Three veterans
and a freckled 22-year-old rookie
shared the first round lead yes-
terday in the $25,000 Western
Open Golf Tournament.
It was a tightly-knit field that
went out after $5,000 top money.
Jack Burke, Bob Rosburg, Fred
Hawkins and Butch Baird had a
one-stroke edge on a flock of
contenders after the first 18 holes.
Each fired a three-under-par 69
over the hilly acres of Western
Golf and Country Club, good for
a one-stroke margin over 10
others.
A total of 158 players, including
10 amateurs; teed up in this 57th
Western Open, being held in De-
troit for the third time in the last
four years.
Rosburg First
Rosburg was the firse to check
in with 69. The pudgy veteran,
trying to snap out of a long slump
in time for a solid defense of his
PGA crown next week, missed a
half dozen putts inside 10 feet
and still managed a sparkling per-
formance.
Burke dunked in birdie putts
of 10, 15, 18 and 20 feet in his 69.
Like Rosburg, Burke has had to
sit out half the tournament action
this year because of a hand in-
jury.
The 36-year-old Hawkins, al-
ways a big money-maker but sel-
dom a winner, had to scramble
for his share of the lead.. The
El Paso shot-maker missed five
greens on the front side and still
equalled par with 36. He fired a
33 on the back nine, twice hitting
birdie putts from 10 feet.
Then Baird
Then came Baird, youngest reg-
ular on the circuit. He hit 15
greens in regulation figures and
did not have a bogie until the
17th where he missed the green
with his second shot.
Gay Brewer, Jr., runnerup in
the Flint Open 10 days ago, was
one of the 10 players just one shot1
off the pace.
Defending champion Mike Sou-
chak, who won $9,000 first place
money at Flint and then took a;
week's vacation, had to play bril-j
liantly to recover with a 74. Burly1
Mike started out with a 41, knock-I
ing two balls out of bounds on the1
fourth hole. He came back in 33
strokes over Western's 6,800-yard'
layout.
In all, 32 players bettered West-
ern's 36-36-72 par. The field will
be cut to the low 70s and ties at
the 36-hole mark tomorrow eve-
ning, and to the low 50 and ties
for the final 18 holes Sunday.

TO POLL MAJOR LEAGUERS:
PreitOeAlSa Game Out

i

NEW YORK (JP)-In the wake
of the disappointing attendancet
of 38,362 Wednesday at the sec-
ond All-Star baseball game atl
Yankee Stadium, the major leaguef
players are expected to-vote next
weekwhether to cut back to one<
game in 1961.
The players asked for a second
game last year and it was sched-
uled for Los Angeles about a
month after the first game at
Pittsburgh. This year two games
were scheduled within a three-
day period at Kansas City and
New York.
Commissioner Ford Frick said
he would be guided by the players,
wishes. Frick indicated a decision
should be madedsoon so that
schedules can be drawn up.
"Actually, I guess it would be
up to me to make the announce-1
ment," he said. "But what is done
will be determined by what the1
players want.''
No Obligation
Frick said there was no contrac-
tural obligation with any TV,
sponsor to run a second game in1
1961. "If we have a second game
it will be sponsored by the same
people," he said, "But we are not 3
obligated to have two."
The TV fee of $250,000 for each
game and the game receipts go
into a central fund. The player
pension fund gets 60 per cent, the
owners get 40 per cent.
Harvey Kuenn of Cleveland,
the American League player rep-
resentative, said he was going to
contact Bob Friend of Pittsburgh,
National League player represen-
Paul Foytack
n Ailing List
D E T R O I T ()-The Detroit
Tigers put right hander Paul Foy-
tack on the disabled list for 30
days yesterday.
Foytack has been hampered by
an ailing pitching shoulder for
much of the season. He has ap-
peared in 15 games and has a 1-7"
record.
As a regular on Detroit's pitch-
ing staff last year, Foytack com-
piled a 14-14 mark.
The Tigers recently called up
pitcher Phil Regan of Wayland,
Mich., from Denver.

tative, and Frank Scott, repre-
sentative of the Major League
Baseball Players Assn., and ask
for a vote right away.
"The pension fund is a good
cause," Kuenn told newsmen in
New York before leaving for home.
"But I think we can do without
the second game and help our-
selves more. We'll pay off the pen-
sion with only one game, even if
it takes a year or so more.
"I was for the two games when
we voted last time. But seeing the
fans' reaction and the ball play-
ers'-well, if I hadn't played in
the two games I might still be for
it ... you can get hepped up for
one. The second one is just not
the same.
Friend said the players would
be polled next week.
"There was some discussion of
the two games during the All-Star
games," he said. "There are pros
and cons. Some say it's too much
and that it takes away from the
original idea of the thing. But the
400 players will have to decide
that.
"We haven't had much good
publicity. You can't complain
about the attendance. It adds a
great deal to our pension fund.
We can use the money."
"Frank Scott is handling the
poll for us. He is sending out the

material. We should have the re-
sults by the end of next week."
Vote On Fate
A majority vote of the members
of the Players' Association would
determine the fate of the second
game.
If only one game is played next
year, it will be played in San
Francisco at a date to be deter-
mined. It is possible that the
players might decide to retain the
two games but revert to the 1959
plan of playing the second a
month after the first.
The Monday game, at Kansas
City, first ever played in that city,
drew a capacity 30,619. The first
Yankee Stadium game since 1939
drew 38,362. In 1939 when the All-
Star idea still was new, a crowd
of 62,892 turned out at Yankee
Stadium.

Milwaukee
Shuts Out
Pittsburh
PITTSBURGH (R) - The boom-
ing bat of Eddie Mathews and the
combined pitching of Bob Buhl
and Lew Burdette paved the way
for a 4-0 Milwaukee Braves vic-
tory over the Pittsburgh Pirates
last night.
The victory in the playoff of a
rained-out Memorial Day game
trimmed the first-place Pirates'
National League lead over the
second-place Braves to four games.
Buhl, a righthander, gave up a
single in each of the first three
innings then held the Pirates hit-
less until the ninth when Bob
Skinner and Dick Stuart hit con-
secutive singles with nobody out.
Burdette came on in relief and
got the next three batters to pre-
serve the shutout and Buhl's vic-
tory, his ninth compared to three
defeats. Buhl walked three and
fanned three.
Mathews drove in three of the
Braves runs and scored the fourth.
He doubled home one marker
in the first, belted a tremendous
two-run homer in the fifth, and
tripled and scored in the ninth.
Mathews' homer, his 17th of the
year, cleared the double-deck right
field stands at Forbes Field. It was
only the seventh time a ball had
been hit over the stands and was
the second time Mathews had done
it.
The Braves clobbered the Pirates'
starter, southpaw Harvey Haddix,
for all three of their runs and 12
hits before he was relieved by Earl
Francis in the seventh.

MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
DON'T MISS
The Big Convention News!
Get your radio fixed almost
Immediately
Music Center

300 S. Thayer

NO 2-250W
X8

ELIKIH

I-M
SCORES

SOFTBALL RESULTS
Psychology 13, 526 Club 0
Chemistry 12,, Bacteriology 11
Medics 11, Radiation Lab 9
Ringers 20, Willow Run 2

Complete line of Hi F1 components
including kits; complete service on
radios, phonographs and
Hi Fi equipments.
HI FI STUDIO
1317 South University
1 block east at Campus Theatre
X2
PIANOS-ORGANS NEW & USED
Ann Arbor Piano & Organ Co.
213 E. Washington NO 3-3109
X1
A-1 New and Used Instruments
BANJOS, GUITARS and BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington NO 2-1834
X3
Pianos
MIRROR STYLE CONSOLE --
Used, perfect condition ..$189
USED UPRIGHTS-From ..$49
STEINWAY CONSOLE - Like
new. Special ..........$995
GRAND PIANOS-From .. .$295
NEW GRINNETLL-Holly spinet
..........................$479
Organs
HAMMOND-Extra voice. Only
.. --......... -.. . -.......$905
PORTABLE CHORD ORGAN
.............. . .-. . $79
Grinnel l's
323 S. Main St.
X7
PERSONAL
FOOD HINTS FOR YOUR SUMMER
MENU-One portion rattlesnake steak
contains 200 calories. One ,bowl bird's
nest soup 75 calories. Ten chocolate-
covered ants 250 calories. One serv-
ing of barracuda 135 calories. One
glass hippopotamus milk 80 calories.
P45

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .80 2.00 2.96
3 .96 2.40 3.55
4 1.12 2.80 4.14
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily
Phone NO 2-4786
REAL ESTATE
STOP and SEE
1804 CooIey Ave.
$16,500
By owner, three yr. old, three
bedroom ranch. Slate entry,
large living room, dining area,
tile bath. Aluminum storms,
screens, gutters. Shrubs. and
flowers. Lot 53x170x101x150
on quiet dead end street one
block from Wines and For-
sythe schools. 1804 Cooley
Ave. NO 3-6551.
SEE IT TODAY! !
GRAD STUDENT LEAVING. Nice home
with 2 bdrm., basement, "large lot.
Phone2NO 3-2595. R1
BARGAIN CORNER
MEN'S short-sleeve sport shirt 11.00.
'Skip-dents & seer-suckers sanforized
wash & wear, asstd. colors.\
Sam's Store 122 E. Washington
WI
ROOM AND BOARD
TIRED of restaurants? Eat better for
less at Alpha Chi Sigma, 1319 Cam-
bridge. NO 2-8312. E4

USED CARS
1953 PONTIAC. Automatic, new plugs,
exhaust. $245. NO 5-6203 evenings.
N12
PLYMOUTH, '55. Original owner. 38,000
miles. Motor excellent. Body rusted.
$295. Call after 7 P.M. NO 8-8451. N9
CLEAN '54 Volkswagon. Sunroof. New
WSW tires, safety belts, radio. NO
3-3893. N1
EXCELLENT CONDITION. 1954 Buick
Special. 2 door, 4 nylon.tires. Orig-
inal owner. Phone NO 2-4194. N8
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
C-TED STANDARD SERVICE
Friendly service is our business.
Atlas tires, batteries and accessor-
ies. Warranted & guaranteed. See
us for the best price on new &
used tires. Road service-mechanic
on duty.
"You expect more from Standard
and you get it!"
1220 S. University at Forest
NO 8-9168
81
WHITE'S AUTO SHOP
Bumping and Painting'
, 2007 South State NO 2-3350
82
FOR RENT
CAMPUS-Large quiet rooms for men.
Low rates. Linens furnished. NO
3-4747. C30
GOOD STUDENT apartments close to
campus at 344 S. Division. Phone Mr.
Pray. F. A. Sergeant Co. Realtors,
NO 2-3259. C12
YPSILANTI: Ranch house, 3 bdrms.,
full basement. Near schools; good con-
dition, good neighborhood. Fenced lot;
unfurnished. $110 per month. Call HU
3-0790. C29
EDGE OF CAMPUS-a nice 2 room fur-
nished apt. Private bath, all utilities.
$75 a month. NO 8-7234. 027
FURN. 1st floor apt., 3 rms., bath, pri-
vate entrance, and laundry facilities.
All utilities paid. $110 per month.
Phone NO 3-0292. C26
BUSINESS SERVICES
FLUNKING A COURSE?
Bribe your instructor.
Buy him an apple at
RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard NO 5-7131
"Open every night 'til Midnight"
J23
WANTED TO RENT
APT. for responsible couple. Desire to
work off part of rent. Available Sept.
1. Box 12. Li
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Off-white leather billfold with
6 keys. Help I'm locked outl Contact
K. Moore, NO 2-3241. A3

U

HILLEL SUMMER HIGHLIGHTS
OPEN TO ALL

SABBATH SERVICES
Fridays, 7:30 P.M.
Saturdays, 9 A.M.

PICNICS AND SWIMMING
Sundays, July 17, 31
(meet at Hillel at 2 o'clock)

SUPPER CLUB
(at cost)
Sundays at 6,
July 24 - August 7

"The BIBLE on BROADWAY"
Wednesdays at 8, July 20, 27; August 3

f ae te
UyOiVTADS
i

1. "The Dybbuk," "The Tenth Man"
Prof. Edward Stasheff

2. "Job"
Prof.

and "J.B."
Marvin Felheim

3. "The Flowering Peach" (by Clifford Odets)
Jerrold Sandler, (WUOM)
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION . . . 1429 Hill

ALL CAMPUS DANCE
League Ballroom
Friday nite 9-12
Stag or Drag

F41

.. .. ... .. .. .. ... .. .. .. .. .... ... .. ... ..

ENNIS ROUNDUP:

DI

E

OUT

THIS

EEKE

D

Bartzen, MacKay To Play
First Davis Cup Round

QUEBEC CITY (P) Bernard
(Tut) Bartzen and Barry MacKay
yesterday were named to repre-
sent the United States In today's
two opening singles matches
against Canada in first round play
of the American zone Davis Cup
competition.
Bartzen,a 32 - year - old left-
hander from Dallas with a repu-

row and the two concluding singles
matches on Sunday.
The other members of the United
States squad are Earl Buchholz of
St. Louis and Chuck McKinley of
St. Ann, Mo. Francois Godbout
and Roland Godin complete the
Canadian squad.
The winner of the United States-
Canadian series will meet Mexico
in Mexico City, Aug. 6-7-8.
* s s
CHICAGO (M- -Barry MacKay
of Dayton, Ohio, yesterday was
seeded No. 1 ahead of his United
States Davis Cup teammate, Ber-
nard (Tut) Bartzen of Dallas, for
the National Clay Courts Tennis
Tournament starting Monday.
The tourney in suburban River
Forest was won last year by the
32-year-old Bartzen for the third
time. It features the complete cur-
rent United States and Australian
Davis Cup teams.
Earl Buchholz Jr. and Chuck
McKinley, the other United States
Davis Cup players, were seeded
No. 3 and 4, respectively.
* * *
WIMBLEDON, England (M -
Italy's experienced tennis pair,
Nicola Pietrangeli and Orlando
Sirola, shot into a 2-0 lead over
Britain yesterday and put Italy
on the brink of the European zone
final of the Davis Cup.
The Italian stars need to win
only their doubles clash against
Wilson and Davies today or one of
the last two singles matches to
qualify for the European zone final
for the fifth time in six years.
The winner plays either Sweden
or France, who meet in the other
semifinal starting in Stockholm
today.

The DEL RIO
.. .known for its good pizza
also
SPAGHETTI - RAVIOLI - STEAKS - CHOPS - CHICKEN
Special Served Daily
PASTIES-made every Wednesday-
orders taken in advance
FREE DELIVERY-CLOSED MONDAY
122 W. WASHINGTON ST. Phone NO 2-9575

Good food...expertly served,i

in plean'zn!

surroundings, to the most exacting taste,

Luncheons.11:30 to2:00

Dinners,5:00 to 7:00

Sunday: Dinners. 12:00 to 3:00 Closed Mondays
We suggest that you telephone
for reservations
Oh~e Corner fouje
S. Thayer at Washington in Ann Arbor
-- t-A block west of ltak hom Bldg.-NO 8-6056

..0001

CHUCK WA GON
LUNCH and DINNERS Fine Salads to Sandwiches
FAMOUS FOR ROAST BEEF
serving WINES and BEERS from all over the world
Open 9 A.M. to 9 P.M. * Closed Sundays during July and August
Recommended by DUNCAN HINES and GOURMET
BANQUET FACILITIES AVAILABLE
2045 PACKARD NO 2-1661
Catering at Your Home or Hall - Picnics Henry Turner, Prop.

IL

The GOLDEN APPLES
Restaurant
Featuring
BREAKFAST 7:30-11:30
BUFFET LUNCHEONS $1.10
DINNERS from $1.75
A LA CARTE from $1.25
7:30-2:00, 5:00-9:00 Daily
TOWER HOTEL

BARRY MACKAY
.. , seeded first
tation as a superior player on clay
courts, will oppose Bob Bedard, a
Canadian Cup veteran. Bartzen,
the assistant captain, is rated No.
2 in the United States for his 1959
play. Alex Olmedo, the No. 1 man,
has turned pro.
MacKay, a polder player with a
cannonball first service, will face
Canada's Don Fantana in the
other opening day match in the
best-of-five series. MacKay de-
'eated Australia's Rod Laver in
last year's Davis Cup challenge
round but lost the final match to
Neale Fraser. He is ranked No. 3
among the United States players.
Premier Jean Lesage of Quebec
made the draw for the matches
to be played on the clay courts of
the Civil Employees Tennis Club.
The doubles will be played tomor-

LEO PING SAY: Every day Leo is nominated on the frstA
oJ * ballot for serving the finest food ever served folks.
-0
o Enjoy the finest in
0 C antonese and
American Food
0 atns n 1

Phone NO 2-4531

300 South Thayer

Open All Day Sunday

.......
------

The MICHIGAN LEAGUE

offering
relaxing

FINE FOOD in a
dining atmosphere

0

11

Ii El"

I

1111

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan