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July 09, 1960 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1960-07-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

IPHITYRON 38':
Giraudoux Version Praised.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Spies Adopt
]Veu',Subtle ff ,

(.

Although the legend of the
Greek warrior Amphitryon has
since been rewritten three times,
Prof. Hugh Z. Norton of the
speech department believes that
Jean Giraudoux's version, "Am-
phitryon 38," which he is current-
ly directing at the Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theatre, is by far the best.
He believes that Giraudoux has
done "a masterful job" of writing
a play which is not a revision, but
a burlesque of the original legend.
Comedy For Sheer Fun
By a burlesque, he means a
comedy taken from a serious story
and intended for sheer fun. Gir-
audoux claims that his version is
the 38th, hence its title.
There is no "heavyweight dra-
ma" in a burlesque such as "Am-

phitryon 38," Prof. Norton said,
but there is poignancy and much
"charming and thoughtful com-
ment on the nature of man and
his relation to the gods."
Because the play is intended to
be funny, people often tend to
overlook the strong basic theme,
the power of a beautiful and vir-
tuous woman to remain virtuous.
It is, Prof. Norton said, "a beau-
tiful, comic burlesque in praise
of marital virtue."
Because it is not meant to be
buffoonery, but high, sophisti-
cated comedy, Prof. Norton said
that the director's main concern
in a production such as "Amphi-
tryon 38" must be with style.
The show must be beautifully

costumed and given settings and
lighting as light and airy as pos-
sible, to harmonize with the light-
ness of the comedy itself.
English Adaptation
The Playbill presentation of
"Amphitryon 38" was adapted
from Giraudoux's French into
English by S. N. Behrman, who
made several changes in the orig-
inal script.
His main alteration was to cut
out many of the long rhetorical
passages, because, Prof. Norton
explained, American audiences
simply will not listen to them as
European audiences will.
The play will run at the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre through this
evening.

T-echniques
(EDITOR'S NOTE: The Bolseviks
had barely consolidated their power
in Russia before they sent their
first spy to the U.S.-Ludwig Mar-
tens, who set up shop as secret
agent No. 1 on Jan. 2, 1919. Just
what happened to Martens later is
unclear, but since his day the U.S.-
Russian spy exchange apparently
has reached parade proportions.
While the cloak-and-dagger type
has his uses, most intelligence
gathering is done by other means.
Here is a report.)
By BEM PRICE
Associated Press Newsfeatures writer
WASHINGTON-Apparently the
U.S. and Russia have been swap-
ping so many spies since the cold
war began the boys ought to
qualify for tourist rates.
Moscow radio complained back
in 1954 that the U.S. employed
more than 100,000 spies and sabo-
teurs.
This 100,000 figure was no doubt
greatly inflated. But in any case,
there has been a sort of shuttle
service between Washington and
Moscow for diplomatic personnel
accused of spying or heading spy
rings.
Over the past 10 years the U.S.
has officially invited 11 Russians
to do their spying elsewhere, while
the Russians have done likewise to
seven Americans.
A naval intelligence officer once
commented: "About 95 per cent
of our information comes from
books, newspapers and technical
publications. About 3 per cent
comes from semi-covert sources
and about 2 per cent from covert
sources-secret agents."
Now the case of Francis G.
Powers falls within the semi-
covert operations category. Pow-
ers is the pilot who set off 'the
current hullabaloo by getting
caught some 1,300 miles inside
Russia with a camera-equipped
airplane.
When the U.S. admitted pub-
licly that planes were being dis-
patched over Russia regularly, the
Russian reaction was: so what
else is new?
The Russians have been firing
protest notes about such activities
since 1950. The notes have come
fairly often since 1956-about the
time we learned the Soviets had
developed long range rockets.
Since August 1956, the Russians
have complained about 10 times
that U.S. aircraft have violated
their airspace. The reaction has
not always been verbal. Since

SECRET-Going out of style is the "cloak and dagger" agent.
Only two per cent of important military data comes from such
"covert" sources, claimed a Navy official. However, Moscow has
complained that the U.S. employs over 100,000 spies,

SEMI-SECRET-Francis G. Powers, the American pilot who waa
caught 1,200 miles inside Russian territory with a camera-equip.
ped plane, is classified as a "semi-covert" source of informatiom
for military intelligence agencies.
rnr4To

1950 the Russians have shot down
12 U.S. planes.

This fact came to light when
we produced a tape recording of

Airplanes are just one of the what is described as a conversa-
semi-covert sources. There is a tion between Russian fighter-pilots

huge radar station in Turkey to
track Russian missiles fired from
bases on the Caspian Sea.
Further, the U.S. apparently
has been monitoring military

in the process of shooting down
a four-engine Air Force plane
"lost" 140 miles inside Armenia.
The Russians don't have to fly
over the U.S. to locate American
bases. For a small fee, we will sell
them a map.

radio traffic - conversations
messages-inside Russia.

andI

Prof. Haugh To Conduct Class
At English Conference Series

Still, there are reports of Rus-
sian planes over the Arctic--un-
verified - but they are probably
looking for anti-Russian radar
stations.
They also have fleets of radar
and sonar equipped fishing trawl-
ers operating in the Bering Sea
and the North Atlantic.
When the U.S. noted the pres-
ence of these trawlers, Soviet
Fisheries Minister A. A. Ishkov
explained blandly in 1958 that
they were observing fish migra-
tions.
Presumablythe fish migrated
to a point 60 miles off Long
Island April 30, for there was the
Russian trawler, Vega. She hap-
pened to be a mile from where
the Polaris missile submarine,
George Washington, was testing
launching equipment.
Russian submarines have been
sighted repeatedly offshore, ap-
parently mapping the coastline
and the bottom-a waste of time
since the U.S. will sell them such
maps. There have been unverified
but persistent reports that Rus-
sian submarines have been track-
ing U.S. missile shots.

-Daily-James Warneka
AMPHITRYON 38-Mercury, played by Conrad Stolzenbach, delivers a warning to Alkmena, Jan
Roberts, in the summer Playbill production now being presented at Lydia Mendelssohn. Jean Girau-
doux's adaptation, supposedly the 38th version of the Greek legend, is a burlesque of human folly.
The comedy closes tonight.

.o Lecture
On Theatre

Jerrold Sandler will
"Theater as Catharsis"

speak
at 8 P

Prof. Oscar M. Haugh of the
education school of the University
of Kansas will conduct a demon-
stration class Monday at 4 p.m.
in Aud. C, Angell Hall, as part of
the conference series for high
school English teachers.
Editor of the Kansas Bulletin
of Education, Prof. Haugh will
demonstrate teaching listening in
the high school. He is also co-
author of a book, "Effective Eng-
lish; Curriculum Guides in the
Teaching of English."
The purpose of the conference
series isto furnish opportunity
for high school and college Eng-
lish teachers to examine and dis-
cuss basic teaching problems.
Prof. Carlton F. Wells of the Uni-
versity will be chairman of the
meeting Monday.
Prof. Haugh's program is the
fourth in the conference series.
There are two further meetings,
on the next two consecutive Mon-
days.

tomorrow at the First Unitaria
Church,
Presently a producer-writer i
WUOM, Sandler is a member
the Board of Directors of th
Dramatic' Arts Center and hai
directed several plays for the Cer
ter. These have included "TI
Diary of Ann Frank" and "MaJc
Barbara." He served on the steel
ing committee which recently at
tempted to locate a repertor
theater in Ann Arbor.
Sandler received, a mast4r's 4d
gree in mass communicatior
from New York University-i
1953. He has served on the facull
of Indiana University as produ
cer-writer and instructor in tb
radio and television departmen

CAFE

NETU LF ICI LBULLFEATIYDN N
'ur izi" sssiiygizG !g Y3322252222 EM 23-+ - - - -

PROMETH EAN
--508 E. William--
Wed. and Thurs.-Poetry
Fri. and Sat.-Folk songs
(50c door charge)
Sunday-JAZZ--94 + pm
(75c door charge)
Open daily 8p.m. to2 a.m.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which Thp
Michigan Daily assumes no edi-
torial responsibility. Notices should
be sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Build-
ing, before 2 p.m. two days preced-
ing publication.
SATURDAV, JULY 9, 1960
VOL. LXX, NO. 14S
General Notices
SENIORS: College of L.S.&.A., and
Schools of Education, Music, Public
Health, and Business Administration:
Tentative lists of seniors for August
graduation have been posted on the
bulletin board in the first floor lobby,
r Ad Bldg. Any changes therefrom should
be requested of the Recorder at Office
of Registration and Records window
Number A, 1513 Ad Bldg.
Last Time Tonight: AMPHITRYON 33,
8:00 p.m. Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
Tickets $1.75 and 1.25. Box office open
10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Season or single tick-
'eta for AMPHITRYON 38. AS YOU LIKE
IT, PICNIC, and DON GIOVANNI also
available.
Recitals
Faculty Recital: Marilyn Mason, or-
ganist, will present a recital in Hill
Aud. at 4:15 p.m., Sun., July 10. Miss
Mason, who will be assisted by a Brass
Ensemble conducted by George Caven-
der, will perform compositions by Cook,
Gabrieli, Clark, Bingham, Purcell, Han-
del, Roger-Ducasse, and Kabelac. Open
to the public.
Academic Notices
Summer Biological Symposium: Three
morning lectures include the following:
Eberhard Wecker, The Wistar Institute
of Anatomy and Biology, Pliladelphia,
will speak on "Structural Elements and
Their Function in Some Animal Vi-
ruses at 9:00 a.m.; Alfred Gottschalk,
The Australian National University,
Canberra, will speak on "Chemical and
Physical Structure of a Francis Inhibi-
tor at 10:00 a.m.; Heinz Fraenkel-Con-
rat, University of California, Berkeley,

will speak on "Structure and Function
of a Sophisticated Particle: 'Tobacco
Mosaic Virus" at 11:00 a.m. All ses-
sions will be held in Aud. B, Angell
Hall, Mon., July 11.
Summer Biological Symposium: An
evening session with two speakers will
be held Mon., July 11 in Aud. B, Angell
Hall. Lloyd M. Kozloff, University of
Chicago, will discuss "The Nature of
Bacterial Viruses" and Pierre Freder-
icq, University of Liege, Belgium, will
speak on "Colicins and Their Relation
to Bacteriophages." The lectures will
be at 7:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m.
Placement Notices
Beginning July 13, the following
schools will have representatives at
the Burea of Appointments to inter-
view for the 1960-61 school year.
Wed., July 13
Detroit, Mich.-All Fields except Soc.
Studies and Men's Phy. Ed.
Thursday, July 14
Pontiac, Mich. (Waterford Township
Schools)-E. Elem., Vocal; Speech Cor.,
Jr. HS Latin/French; Art Consultant.
For any additional information and
appointments contact the Bureau of
Appointments, 3528 Ad Bldg., NO 3-
1511, Ext. 489.
The following schools have listed
teaching vacancies for the 1960-61
school year.
Agana, Guam-Speech Therapy, Girls
Guid. Couns., Cafeteria Manager, Elem.,
Girls & Boys Phys Ed., Latin, Spanish,
Art, Music, Math, Sci., Bus. Educ.
Blue Island, Ill.-Girls Phys. Ed., 9th
& 10th Gr. Math.
Coldwater, Mich.-7th Grade Gen.
Sci., Elemn (1, 2 & 3).
Dearborn, Mich. (Dist, No. 2)-Comrn.,
Voc. Mus., Elem (6).
Dowagiac, Mich-Elem (5 & 6), Vo-
cal. SD.; Jr. HS Math; HS Eng.
Edmore, Mich.-HS English/Library.
Fort Buchanan, Puerto Rico (Antilles
Con. Sch.)-Jr. HS Math/Scd., Math;
Elem. and HS Vocal Music.
Haslett, Mich.-Elem. (2, 4, & 5);
Chem/Math.
Holly, Mich.-HS Math (Adv. Algebra,
Geom., Trig. & Coach Jr. Varsity Bas-
ketball.
Lexington, Mo. (Wentworth Military
Gen. Sci.
Academy - HS Math/Physics, Math/

Port Huron, Mich--(Fort Gratiot Sc)
-Elem. (First Grade)
St. Joseph, Mich.-Elem (1 & 8) Elem.
Phys. Ed.; 8th Gr. Math/Sci., Eng. Hist.
South Lyon, Mich.-Elem. (2, 3, & 4);
Spec. Educa,: Ment. Ret.
For any additional information, con-
tact the Bureau of Appointments, 3528
Ad. Bldg., NO 3-1511, Ext. 489,
County of Kalamazoo, Mich. Juvenile
Court Probation Officer.
Bausch & Lomb Incorporated, Ro-
chester, New York. Staff Industrial En-
gineer. Must have strong experience in
time and methods study plus degree
in I.E., M.E. or E.E.
Fome-Cor Corp., Addyston, Ohio. Sen-
for Development Group, B.S. or M.S.,
Ch.E. or M.E.; Engineer, Process De-
velopment Group, B.S. or M.S., ChE or
M.E. or E.E.; Production Supervisor,
B.S. or M.S., ChE., ChE., M.E. or Ind.
Eng.
Pittsburgh Coke & Chemical Co. As-
sistant Supervisor, B.S. in Ch.E., five
yrs. experience in production of organic
chemicals; Plant Chemist, B.S. in
Chem, 3 yrs. control lab experience,
B.S. in Chem or M.E. minimum of 5
yrs. experience in Maintenance or Pro-
ject Engineering in Chem. process in-
dustry.
W. R. Grace & Co., Dewey and Almy
Chem. Div., Mass. Summary of current
personnel requirements: R e s e a r c h:
Polymer Research Chemist, Polumer
Research Group Leader. Construction
Specialties Research Mgr., Construction
Specialties Research Chemist, Can Seal-
ing Research Manag;er, Special Projects
Sr. Research Chemist, Sr. Research
Chemist, Research Chemist-Closure, Re-
search Chemist, Lithographic Print
Blandets. Sr. Research Chemist, Re-
search in New Products Dev., Super-
visor. Mfg. & Eng.: Development En-
gineer, Central Research, Development
Engineer-Special Project, Plnt De-
velopment, Engineer, Plant Develop-
ment Engineer (Kentucky), Plant Man-
ager, Manufacturing Assistant (Wor-
cester), Maintenance foreman. Sales:
Sales Res., Sales Trainee-organic
chemicals, Sales Rep.-organic chemi-
cals. General: Financial Analyst, Ac-

counting Liaison, Project Engineer
(Domestic), Project Engineer (Over-
seas), Systems Analyst of Senior Ac-
countant, Market Research (Worces-
ter), Product Advertising Supervisor
(creative writing. Journalism degree.
plus some experience).
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 4021 Admin.
Bldg., ext. 3371.
Organization
Notices
July 9, 1960
Lutheran Student Association, July
10, 7 p.m., Hill St. at Forest Ave.
Speaker: Dr. Q. E. Lenski, "The Image
of Man in Contemporary Sociology."
DIAL NO 8-6416
4 ENDING TONIGHT '
"NUDE IN A
WHITE CAR"
* STARTS SUNDAY
Another man's
wife was his
MAD obsession!

PROF. OSCAR M. HAUGH
. .. demonstrates listening

I

rC OME
ON I.

ro)

cr uaJ

rI!

~AB BrrA"TH

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Paul V. Matheson, Assistant
Sunday Masses, 6:30, 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M.,
12:00 noon and 12:30 P.M.
Holyday Masses 6:30, 7:00, 8:00 and 9:00
A.M., 12:00 noon and 5:10 P.M..
Week-day Masses 6:00, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00 and
9:00 A.M.
Novena Devotions: Wed. evening, 7:30.
Class in fundamentals of the Christian faith,
Monday and Thursday evenings at 7 P.M.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgwood
Lester F. Allen, Minister
10:00 A.M. Bible School.
11:00 A.M. Regular Worship.
6:30 P.M. Evening Worship.
WEDNESDAY--
7:30 P.M. Bible Study.

"FLESH ,
AND
DESIRE"K

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENI
CHAPEL & CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Arthur L. Dauer, Vicar
William F. Eifrig, Director of Music
Sunday at 9:30 A.M. Bible Study.
Sunday at 10:45 A.M. Worship Service, Sermon
by pastor, "How to be Truly Tolerapt."
Sunday at 6:00 P.M. Gamma Delta, Lutheran
Student Club, Supper & Program. Discus-
sion of the book, "The Riddle of Roman
Catholicism."
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron St.
William C. Bennett, Pastor
10:00 A.M. Church School.
11 :00 A.M. Morning Worship Service Rev.
Sanford Morgan, "First Things First."
5:45 P.M. Jr. and Sr. High Youth Groups.
7:00 P.M. Evening Service - Rev. Sanford
Morgan, "The God of State'Street."
7:30 P.M. Wednesday Prayer Meeting. Rev.
Wolfe Hanson - West Indies Mission.
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
8:30 A.M. Douglas Chapel,
1 :00 A.M. Sanctuary
Dr. Luchs preaching, "Are Ministers Com-
munists?"
Sunday Vespers, 6:15 p.m., WOIA-1290,
" Dr. Luchs.
Student Guild: Tuesday, 7:30, "Conversa-
sational Punch" at Guild House, 524
Thompson.
Church School: 11:00 a.m., crib through
9th grade.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw NO2-3580
Wm. S. Baker, Campus Pastor.
Patricia Pickett, Raja Nosr, counselors
Sunday Morning worship at 9:00 and 10:30
A.M. "Pulpit and Pew."
Student Coffee Hour at 11:30 A.M., Lewis
Room.
Tuesday 8-10 P.M. "Conversation with Punch"
at the Guild House, 524 Thompson.
Grad Group meets Friday, July 15th, 5:00 P.M.
at church for swim and picnic at Silver
Lake.
CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1131 Church St.
Dr. E. H. Palmer, Minister
Morning Service, 10:30 A.M.
University Bible Class, 9:30 A.M.
Evening Worship Service, 7:00 P.M.
MEMORIAL BAPTIST CHURCH
411 Fountain Street
Rev, William Nicholas, Pastor
and Student Advisor. NO 3-0698
Sunday School, 9:45 A.M.
Worship Service, 11:00 A.M.
Training Union, 7:00 P.M.
Worship Service, 8:00 P.M.
Prayer Meeting, 7:30 P.M. Wednesday.
Cooperating with the Southern Baptist Con-
vention.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH AND
WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Hu.on Streets, Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Rev. Gene Ransom, Minister to students

I

DIAL NO 5-6290

NOW

I

ENDING DIAL
TONIGHT NO 2-6264
Late Show Tonte 11 P.M.
A PHILP A, WAXMAN PROUCTION A COLMA PICTUJS RELEASE
STARTING SUNDAY

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Avenue
Ernest R. Klaudt, Pastor
Orville H. Schroer, Parish Minister.
9:30 A.M. Worship Service.
10:45 A.M. Worship Service.

"Ernest Borgnine in
'Pay or Die is a sure

Oscar winner."
-LEE MORTIMER-N. Y. Mirror

LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Kill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Gerald N. Kissell, Pastor
SUNDAY-
9:30 A.M. Bible Study.
1 0:30 A.M. Worship Service,

THE TRUE-AS-LIFE-AND-DEATH STORY OF T&
MAMN WHfLED THE FIRGIT MINST THE MAFIA!

*F
*t

*" A .

9:00 and 11:00 A.M. Morning Worship.
'The Power of Positive Faith." Dr. Rupert

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH

I' ,:

f

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