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July 07, 1960 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1960-07-07

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THE MICHIGAN MAIL}Y

RUSHCHEV'S PREDECESSOR:
leds Regret Malenkov's Exile

[TOR'S NOTE: William L.
eturned recently from a visit
Soviet Union, his first since

By WILLIAM L. RYAN
Associated Press News Analyst
ONE OF Moscow's more popular
politicians isn't in Moscow.
He's somewhere on the fringe of
western Siberia, in political dis-
grace. But the memory of him
lingers, adding to the problems of
Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev,
who exiled him.
A returning visitor who knew
the USSR seven years ago gets the
impression that many a Soviet
citizen regrets the downfall of
Georgi M. Malenkov, Khrush-
chev's predecessor as Premier.
Russians liked his dreams. Un-
der Malenkov, after Stalin's death,
they began to lose their fear of
the police state and feel relief
from its more repressive aspects.
Some of the notable differences
between the Moscow of today and
that of 1953, the year of Stalin's;
death, are linked with the 1953--55
period of Malenkov's premiership.;
Kindles Hopes
Malenkov kindled popular hopes
for living standards approaching
those of Americans. To many a
young Russian, such a living stan-
dard would include fulfillment of
his dream-his own automobile.
Almost anywhere in the Soviet
Union, the appearance of a late-
model American automobile still
creates a minor sensation. Young
men and women examine it with;
frank admiration, ask a flood of
questions. Seldom, however, do
they ask any more whether Amer-
ican workers have their own cars.
Russians are automobile-hungry,
but most, by now, have abandoned
hope of owning their own cars.

Premier Khrushchev, after his
United States visit, testified to
the abundance of American auto-
mobiles. But he told his longing
public: there will be no mass pro-
duction of cars for private owner-
ship. In the USSR's scheme of
things, cars are a luxury, Taxis
and state-operated car pools would
suffice.
Skips Car Age
The USSR almost skipped the
automobile age, leaping from the

velopment of a transportation sys-
tem.
Lack of modern road networks-
to say nothing of adequate railway
transportation - interferes with
many areas of the economy as the
regime demands more and more
popular effort to overtake and sur-
pass United States production.
Agriculture Up
Agricultural production is in-
creasing all the time, but the
transport system is so bad that
there is a great deal of wkste and
spoilage in getting the goods to its
urban market. Distribution is a
nagging problem.
Industrial production suffers
from the lack of adequate trans-
port links.
Even the official Soviet press
concedes the USSR is backward in
the fields of transportation and
storage of goods. It calls this a
vital central problem in develop-
ment of the internal economy.
The Soviet press sees no reason
why the transport bottleneck
should not be broken or why the
Soviet storage and transporta-
tion systems should not compare
favorably with those of western
Europe and the United States.
The press demands better inter-
industry and intra-industry trans-
port links, better rail, water and
automotive transportation of goods
and a broad integrated transpor-
tation system as a most important
factor in releasing the country's
full productive capacities.
Future Better
Eventually the Soviet Union will
ease its transportation problems.
Probably mechanization in agri-
culture and automation in indus-
try one day will bring the goal
of a shorter work week within the
grasp of a much larger group of
Soviet citizens. But these develop-
ments surely will have their effect
upon the Soviet way of life.
People who admired Georgi
Malenkov's "Utopian pipe dreams"
have had their appetites whetted.
The Communist Party either must
try to appease those appetities or
return to harsher measures to curb
them. And in either solution there
are unpleasant risks for the fu-
ture of rigid Communist party
control.

'U' To Hlos t
Education
Conference
"Prognosis for Public Education"
is the theme for the 1960 Summer
Education Conference, expected to
draw some 500 administrators and
faculty members from Michigan
and surrounding states to the Uni-
versity July 11 through 13.
Free registration will take place
outside Schorling Aud., University
High School. Dean Willard C. Ol-
son of the University education
school is chairman of the confer-
ence.
Paul S. Brandwein, general edi-
tor and education consultant for
Harcourt Brace Publishing Co.,
will discuss "Invitation to Gentle
Combat" at the opening sessioni
of the conference July 11.
In the afternoons, special in-
terest groups will form to consider
such subjects as teaching ma-
chines, teaching practices in math-
ematics, foreign languages, sci-
ence, business and physical edu-
cation, and school design and
financial support.
Contemporary and comprehen-
sive displays of current textbooks,'
trade books, audio-visual materials'
and other school supplies, avail-
able through the courtesy of over
50 publishers and school supply
companies, will line the hallways
of University High School for the
conference.
Zeff Receives
Steel Award
Stephen A. Zeff, Grad., of the
University business administration
school, has been awarded a two-
year fellowship by the United
States Steel Foundation to carry
out research on his doctoral thesis.'
The $3,000 per year fellowship
was announced by Prof. Thomas
G. Gies, scholarship committee
chairman of the business adminis-
tration school.
Zeff formerly attended the Uni-
versity of Colorado where . he
taught in n1955-57.Hisndoctoral
fields are accounting, industrial
relations and management, and
economics.

-David Giltrow
CLASSIC COASTLINE-Stretches of beach and ocean along the East coast are visited every summer
by vacationers who desire the less crowded, more individualized and private spectacles offered by the
Atlantic.
CIVIL ENGINEERING:
Conference Criticizes Curricula

I d dr , Ca r usp
New educational methods, re-
search studies in speech and an
assessment of speech communica-
tion will be examined by eight
staff lecturers in a presentation
before the Summer Speech Con-
ference held here today under
the auspices of the University
speech department.
Meetings will be from 9:45 a.m.
to noon and : to 5 p.m. with lunch
at 12:15 p.m. in the Anderson Rm.
of the Union.
The University physical educa,
tion department will sponsor a
conference today on "The Present
and Future of Physical Education
in Today's Society.
Morning speakers will be Jay B.
Nash, professor of emeritus of
New York University, and Prof.
'Ruth Glassow of the University
of Wisconsin. A joint discussion
session will be held at 2 p.m. in
the Women's Athletic Bldg.
s * *
The Conference on Civil Engi-
neering currently being held at
the University will feature W. P.
Kimball of Dartmouth College
presiding at the second session at
9 a.m. today in Rackham on pro-
posed structure of the undergrad-
uate curriculum.
The luncheon address on "India"
will be given by' Earnest Boyce,
chairman of the civil engineering
department. The third session, on
professional development, will be
led by B. A. Whisler of Pennsyl-
vania State University at 2p.m. in
Rackham.
WOMEN'S
HAIRSTYLING
A SPECIALTY !!
- No Appointments Needed--
THE DASCOLA BARBERS
near Michigan Theatre

(.

GEORGI MALENKOV
... former premier
horse-and-wagon to jet planes.
There was no gradual, widespread
development of the automobile age
in between.
Lack of such development de-
prived the Soviet economy, except
at its top, heavy-industry level, of
the machine-wise generations of
the Western world and contrib-
uted to the shortages of such skills
which plague today's Soviet econ-
omy. Equally important, the gap
kept the USSR backward in de-
velopment of its transportation
system.
The Communist Party is paying
for that now. The party's central
committee meets next week, and
the top domestic question on its
agenda concerns problems which
have resulted from laggard de-

Criticism was leveled at the high
school science teacher yesterday
at the Conference on Civil Engi-
neering-he doesn't do enough to
further the interests of engineer-
ing as a career.
Research studies indicate that
the science teacher is the strongest
influence in encouraging and aid-
ing students to choose engineering
as a vocation at the high school
level, except for parents and
friends, authors of a paper pre-
sented at the opening session of
the three-day conference said.
It cannot be proved, the authors
claimed, but this situation tends
to work in favor of science and
against engineering.
- Authors
Writers of the paper were John
W. Graham, engineering college
dean at the University of Roches-
ter, and Thomas E. Stelson, asso-
ciate professor and head of civil
engineering at Carnegie Institute
of Technology. The conference is
sponsored by the American So-

11

ciety of Civil Engineers and
Cooper Union under anNational
Science Foundation grant.
"More effective counseling will
be needed if engineering is to at-
tract its fair share of the poten-
tially creative young people who
may be interested in technical
careers," the authors reported,
"and this will demand in turn an
understanding on the part of the
counselor and the "counseled" of
the distinction between engineer-
ing and science."
Essentially Inadequate
Critical analysis was also turned
on college engineering curricula
by the educators, who stressed
that training in the basic sciences,
while essential, cannot approach
adequacy for the training of an
engineer.
"In view of the, end goals of
engineers and scientists, it 'Is hard
to believe that the best curriculum
for both can be the same curricu-
lum," they declared.
"Indeed, copsidering the broad
spectrum of individual abilities
and of functions in. which an en-
gineer may be engaged- applica-
tion, sales, maintenance, construc-
tion, production, management, de-
sign, development, research, train-
ing-it is a little difficult to justify
any one given curriculum as best
for one branch of engineering, let
alone for all branches of engi-
neering."
Life Complex
They remarked that from the
technological aspect, life is In-
creasingly complex. This creates
an increase in situations which lie
in the "indistinct, grey area" be-
tween pure science and pure engi-
neering.
Consequently, they added, there
is a tendency for the scientist and
the engineer to migrate back and
forth.

Social Implications of Economic Change
LECTURE

And while migration from engi-
neering to science is not difficult
because of the common scientific
training basic to both fields, mi-
gration in the other direction is
extremely difficult, the educators
said.
Serious Problem
"The migration of these people
from science to applied science-
engineering-is a serious problem
for the engineering professions,"'
they asserted. "They often are not
properly trained, do not under-
stand or accept professional re-
sponsibility and tend to discredit
engineering as a second-rate field,
fit only for people who cannot be
'pure' scientists."

I

NOW!

J

DIAL
NO 2-6264

g DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
_l _ _4.F.'_.-r-... .LC -. :.

HENRY STEELE, (OMMAGER
Professor of History and American Studies
Amherst College

(Em QEiE K"UA),

FLAME NT PN
Of ARFAUUMZ
Q,"U!

I

SUSAN JAMES

I'Mw

.'Oow

lpOSE "LIVMU lK Wr It"tlw dW hIj J arn M 11. Ak11r u '

(Continued from Page 2)
educational methods, research studies
in speech and an assessment of speech
communication. The Luncheon will be
at 12:15 p.m. in the Anderson Rm.,
Michigan Union.
Academic Notices
Doctoral Examination for Jerome Lee
Shapiro, Nuclear Engineering; thesis:
"Reactivity Effects of Modertator Ex-
pulsion in an Enriched, Light Water
Reactor," Thursday, July 7, 315 Auto.
Lab., North Campus, at 10:30 a.m.
Chairman, William Kerr.
Placement Notices
PERSONNEL REQUESTS
Pittsburgh Coke & Chemical Co. Mar-
ket Analyst. B.S. in Chem or Chem.
Eng. 1 to 5 yrs. experience in market
research, sales or development of indus-
trial chem. desirable.
State of Connecticut. Chemist, Medi-
cal Social Worker, Assistant Engineer
of Rental Housing, Clinical Psycholo-
CAFE
PROMETH EAN
-- 508 E. William --

NOW!

# a

DIAL
NO 8-6416

gist, II, Clinical Psychologist I, Labora-
tory Technician III, Materials Techni-
clan, volunteer Services Chief, Senior
Highway Lab. Aide, Clerk III.
City of Detroit. We have the current
listing of openings.
State of Michigan. CompetitivO ex-
ams for electrical inspectors.
U.S. Civil Service. We have a list of
current openings.
Norwich Pharmacal Company, New
York, has openings for chemists of all
kinds, pharmacologists, Pathologists,
microbiologists, pharmacists, openings
as information scientists. Medical Edi-
tor, Translator, Physician, Packaging
Egineer, Draftsman, Research librarian,
Accountant, veterinary Product Mana-
ger-International Division.
Republic Aviation Corp., New York.
Applied Research and Development Div.
Assistant Chief Engineer, Chief of Elec-
tronics and Guidance, Supervising Sci-
entist-Nuclear Radiation Lab., Senior
Staff Eng.-Nuclear Y Radiation Lab.,
Theoretical Aerodynamics, Staff Scien-
tiss, Physical Optics, Senior Electronic
Engineers or Scientists, Electronics
Lab., Mathematician Operational Ana-
lyst. Florida Assignments: Instrumen-
tation Systems Engineers, Electronic
Instrumentation Engineers, Instrumen-
tation Laboratory Engineers, Electronc
Systems Engineers, Reliability Engin-
eer, Scientific Computing Programmers,
Applied Mathematician, Electronic Data
Processing Programmers.
INTERVIEWS:
The following companies will inter-
view at Thurs., July 7, at West Engin-
eering. Make appointments by signing
schedule on bulletin board opposite
Engineering Placement Office, Room 128
H West Engineering Building.
Michigan Public Service Commission,
Lansing. Electrical Engineers. B.B.-M.S.:
E.E., June or August Grads, men. To
work in the public Utilities Division
Section & Telephone Section & Valua-
tion Unit.
United Welders, Inc., Bay City, Mich.

Engineering Mechanics Engineer. All
Degrees: Engrg. Mechanics. August
Grads, men. Design and Sales.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, room 4021,
Admin. Bldg. Ext. 3371.
Beginning Wed., July 13, the follow-
ing schools will have representatives at
the Bureau of Appointments to inter-
view for the 1960-61 school year.
WED., JULY 13
Detroit, Mich, -All fields except
Social Stud. and Men's Phys. Ed.
THURSDAY, JULY 14
Pontiac, Mich. (Waterford Township
Schs.) E. Elem., Vocal; Speech Corr.;
Jr. H.S, Latin/French; Art Consultant.
For any additional information and
appointments contact the Bureau of
Appointments, 3528 Admin. Bldg., NO 3
1511, Ext. 489,

9tQ

for

U

'International Implications of Economic Change"
A joint offering of the Summer, Session
and the Department of Journalism

-1

ENDING Dial
TONIGHT NO 5-6290
SEE THE GHOSTS IN ECTOPLASMIC COLOR!!

I

JU LY 8, 4:10 P.M.
Auditorium A, Angell Hall

COLUMBIA PICTURES Presents

13 GHOSTS
A WILLIAM CASTLE PR ODUCTION

FREE
Ghost-Viewer
TO EVERYONE
WHO SEES
THIS MOVIE!
FILMED IN
ILL USION-O

w
/J .. , ...

Wed. and Thurs.-Poetry
Fri. and Sot.-Folk songs
(50c door charge)
Sunday-JAZZ-9-12 p.m.
(75c door charge)
Open daily 8 p.m. to 2 a.m.

I

I

= ---- --"i-

Cinema eIdI
TONIGHT and TOMORROW
at 7:00 and 9:00
The Western -formula and style
"D EST RYr RIDES AGAIN (39
Directed by George Marshall
with
Marlene Dietrich, James Stewart

Sportswear Sale

I

III

SKIRTS
formerly 7.98 to 12.98
NOW 5.00 to 8.98
BLOUSES
formerly 5.98 to 14.98
NOW 3.98 to 10.00

SIDE SADDLE!
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I6 l

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All spring coats and suits
of wool white, pastels, and
darks. Shorties and long.
Orig. were $29.95 to $55.00
Now $14.98 to $25
50 Dresses
All Better Hats
(Excepting new ribbon and
velvet)
Rings-- Summer Bags
Group long-cinch bras
$5.95
Playtex living Bandeau Bras,
Reg. 3.95.
2 For $6.89
D cups. Reg. $4.95.
2 For $8.89
Sizes 32A 44D

GROUP
Better Dresses

4 to OFF

Group Dresses
and Costume

of silk prints - laces - linen -
shantung - knits. Better cot-
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Orig. were $25.0O-$49.95
Sizes 7-15, 10-'44,12z-24'11

Jackets-Vests- Blazers
formerly 5.98 to 25.00
NOW 3.98 to 19.98
DRESSES

Group Playtex Girdles
and panty girdles with
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&reap Panty Briefs.
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Group Magic Controller
Girdles
Now $3.45
Group Playtex Mold and
tasI * - .a

of all kinds including prints, or-
nel Jersey, lace. Better cottons,
also evening and cocktail types.
Were 2 and 3 times sole price.
All sizes.
$10.00
GROUP
BETTER HATS
Handbags
1-6 strand fresh water; natural
and pastel simulated PEARLS.
Also JEWELRY of all kinds.
BRAS- GLOVES.
$1 .98-$3.98

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