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June 24, 1960 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1960-06-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

.HE MICHIGAN DAILY

axwell's Homer

Beats

Yankees, 2-1;

Even Defeat Has It's Sunny Side

rioles Near First by Downing Chisox

The loss cut the first place Pi-
rates' National League lead to 2%/
games over the second-place Mil-
waukee Braves.
Kline had yielded only one run
and four hits while fanning four
going into the eighth inning. He
retired the first two batters then
walked a man-his third of the
game. St. Louis manager Solly He-
mus immediately yanked Kline
and called McDaniel to the mound.
McDaniel gave up a single before
retiring the side. He set the Pi-
rates down in order in the ninth.
Milwaukee 8, San Francisco 4
MILWAUKEE - Eddie Mathews
blasted a pair of two-run homers
as the Milwaukee Braves com-
pleted a sweep of a four-game
series by humbling fast sagging
San Francisco 8-4 yesterday with
the help of four Giants' errors per-
mitting six unearned runs.
Veteran right -hander Sam
Jones, who was tagged with a loss
in relief Tuesday night, was the
victim of the Giants' shabby in-
field play as he suffered his sev-
enth defeat as compsred with nine
victories.

The triumph moved Milwaukee
to within three games of first
place Pittsburgh, which had a1
night engagement scheduled with
St. Louis. The Giants fell sevenj
full games back while taking their
fifth straight loss and ninth in the
last 11 games.
Mathews paced the Braves to
their sixth consecutive victory and
ninth in 10 games with his 15th
and 16th homers, a couple of4
tremendous blasts to right boost-
ing his career output to 315.
* * *
Cleveland 7, Washington 6
CLEVELAND -- The Cleveland
Indians beat the Washington Sen-
ators, 7-6, on an unearned run
yesterday to sweep the three-game
series.
The winning run was scored off
Truman Clevenger, the last of
four Washington pitchers, after
he had retired the first two batters
in the eighth inning. Pinch-hitter
Chuck Tanner drew a walk and
Jim Perry ran for him. John Tem-
ple singled to right field, sending
Perry to third, and when Bob
Allison made a wild throw to
third, Perry went home with the
winning run.

The loss gave Clevenger a 1-4
record for the season. The winner
was John Briggs, the fourth of five
Cleveland pitchers, who now has
a 3-1 record, all in relief.
Starter Barry Latman for the
Indians was followed to the mound
by Gary Bell, Johnny Klippstein,
Briggs and Dick Stigman.
Chuck Stobbs started for the
Senators and pitched 513 innings.
Other Washington pitchers were
Ray Moore and Hal Woodeshick.
Philadelphia 4, Chicago 3
PHILADELPHIA -- Rookie out-
fielder Ken Walters smashed his
seventh home run of the season
in the eighth inning last night to
give the Philadelphia Phillies a
4-3 victory over the Chicago Cubs
at Connie Mack Stadium.
It was the revitalized Phillies'
fifth consecutive win and enabled
them to move into seventh place
in the National League ahead of
the slumping Cubs by six points.
Walters' blast, off Seth More-
head into the left field upper deck,
broke a 3-3 deadlock to provide re-
lief pitcher Dick Farrell with his
fifth mound triumph. He replaced
rookie Dallas Green in the seventh.

NOT THE END-When he finally regained consciousness after meeting the powerful left hook of
Floyd Patterson, Ingemar Johansson found himself to be a man without a title. But there were
other considerations to ease the pain of his defeat. Promises of $250,000 each to him and to Patter-
son for a return match came flooding in from different parts of the country. The Los Angeles Coun-
ty supervisors claim the Coliseum can be set up to handle 120,000 fans for the bout. New York, Chi-
cago, and Dallas also have sent propositions. Even this, however, brought problems for the hand-
some Swede. He's hesitant about fighting soon because of the taxes he would have to pay for two
bouts within the same year. Johansson left New York yesterday Jor a vacation in Florida' before
he leaves for Switzerland. He and his fiance, Birgit Lundgren, will relax at Fort Lauderdale with
friends. He says he has not yet seen the films of his fight with Patterson, which was heard over
radio by an estimated 50,820,000 persons, largest radio audience ever assembled.

OLYMPIC PRELIMINARY:
Trackmen Warm Up forAA U Meet

- ommimm

Michigan's Dick Cephas, who
qualified for the tryouts in the
NCAA meet last week, is not
expected to compete at Bakers-
field. If he obtains an Olympic
berth, he would be the only
Wolverine track star competing
on the U.S. team. Tom Robin-
son is expected to run for his
native Bahamas and Les Bird
will probably compete for Ja-
maica,
BAKERSFIELD, Calif., MP)-
America's finest track and field
athletes took light drills in 90-
degree weather yesterday in a
final tuneup for the annual Na-
tional AAU Championships.
This host city was bulging with
more than 500 runners, Jumpers
and throwers gathered from all
parts of the country for the two-

night competition
tomorrow.

which begins'

Aim At Olympic Berth
At least seven gold medal win-
ners from the 1956 Olympic
Games in Australia are here. All
are aiming at a berth on the 1960
team headed for Rome and most
of them should make it.
First, however, they must fin-
ish among the first six places here
to get into the final team tryouts
at Stanford, July 1-2, provided
they didn't qualify for the trials
in the National Collegiates at
Berkeley last week.
'Cinches' Numbered In Field
Some appear to be cinches to
win here and lead the parade in
the tryouts.
This select list would include
world hammer thrower Hal Con-
nolly, 400-meter hurdler Glenn

Davis, high hurdler Lee Calhoun
and broadjumper Gregg Bell, all
winners in the 1956 Olympics.
Dumas May Be Second
HighJumper Charles Dumas
may have to take second place
behind the great John Thomas,
but the Southern California ath-
lete should make it with .relative
ease. He is bothered by a groin
injury, but his coach, Jess Mort-
ensen, said he hopes Dumas will
compete because he needs the
work.
Possibly the nearest to losing
out entirely is Texas' Bobby Mor-
row, Uncle Sam's only double win-
ner-100 and 200 meters-in 1956.
The veteran sprinter has been
troubled with a muscle injury in
his leg and thus far this spring
has little of the speed that earned
him world reknown.

And there is the battle of the
shotputters. Parry O'Brien, the
admitted king for eight years,
now trails in recent achievements
to Bill Nieder. O'Brien is the
defending Olympic and AAU
champion: his mark of 63-4 is
still the record in the books. But
Nieder has a 65-7 pending and
has been more impressive all
spring than has O'Brien,

B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 Hill Street
Announces weekly SABBATH SERVICES
starting June 26
in conjunction with BETH ISRAEL CENTER
Fridays at 7:30 P.M. Saturdays at 9 A.M.

for your pleasure ...
The Michigan Union
Bowling Alley - Air-Conditioned
1:00 P.M.-9:00 P.M. Monday through Friday
1:00 P.M.-6:00 P.M Saturday
CLOSED SUNDAY

U U

For your dining pleasure ...

SPAGHETTI HOUSE
FOR THE FINEST IN
PIZZA

I

i

n

Good food . .. .oxpertly served, in pleasant
surroundings, to the most exacting taste.

I

The DEL RIO
...known for its good pizza
also
SPAGHETTI - RAVIOLI - STEAKS - CHOPS - CHICKEN
Special Served Daily
PASTIES-made every Wednesday-
orders taken in advance
FREE DELIVERY-CLOSED MONDAY
122 W. WASHINGTON ST. Phone NO 2-9$75

Luncheons,11:30 to 2:00

Dinners.5:00 to 7:00

I

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11

* SPAGHETTI
* CHICKEN

STEAK
* RAVIOLI

unday: Dinners, 12:00 to 3:00 Closed Mondays
We suggest that you telephone
for reservations.
'ize Corner Rowe
S. Thayer at Washington in Ann Arbor
A block wort .Rckham Bldg.--NO 8-6056

ji

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"Only Italian Spaghetti House in Town"
Businessman lunch served daily
CARRY OUT and DELIVERY

I

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301 E. Liberty at 5th, NO 3-7363

OPEN SUNDAY

The GOLDEN APPLES
Restaurant
Featuring
BREAKFAST 7:30-11:30
BUFFET LUNCHEONS $1.10
DINNERS from $1.75
A LA CARTE from $1.25
7:30-2:00, 5:00-9:00 Daily
TOWER HOTEL

i

s
CHUCK WAGON
LUNCH and DINNERS Fine Salads is Sandwiches
FAMOUS FOR ROAST BEEF
serving WINES and BEERS from all over the world
Open from 1 1 A.M. to 11 P.M. * Closed Tuesdays
Recommended by DUNCAN HINES and GOURMET
BANQUET FACILITIES AVAILABLE

.,

2045 PACKARD
Catering at Your Home or Hall - Picnics

NO 2-1661
Henry Turner, Prop.

Phone NO 2-4531

300 South Thayer

IL Open All Day Sunday

11

r-

r

The MICHIGAN LEAGUE
offering FINE FOOD in a
relaxing dining atmosphere

LEO PING SAY:
Fight fans expected something different.
Folks always expect a grand meal at Leo's.
v _0
Enjoy the finest in 9.I,
Cantonese and
American Food

11

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R"mm m

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