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August 15, 1962 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1962-08-15

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THE MICHIGAN D 1AILY

.a aa. .. ual Valil{11'a.8 L1'1aL1 -..
___ _ a

PAGE THREE

c

Venezuela Visitors View
American Life, Politics

INTERNAL AFFAIRS:
U.S. Walks South American Tightrope

daily paper, showings of both
"West Side Story" and "The Won-
derful World of the Brothers
Grimm."
At the Trans-lux Krim Theatre
in Detroit is Carlo Ponti's Italian
production of "Boccaccio'70."
The N o r t h l a n d Playhouse;
through Aug. 19, will stage the
"Wedding Breakfast" on its stage.
The star is Piper Laurie, Academy
Award winning actress.
For Jazz Buffs
For jazz buffs, The Minor Key
will open with Miles Davis and his
Sextet tomorrow and Baker's Key-
board is featuring Shelley Manne
and his quintet.
Off the sidewalks of New York,
and for that matter on them, is
perhaps the most excitement.
So much there isn't room with-
out benefit of a full page of the
New York newspaper to list it.
Here is some of the best.
Plans Float
The home of theatre still has
some good plays floating around.
At the Theatre de Lys is "Brecht
fon Brecht."
St. Marks Playhouse is present-
ing Jean Genet's "The Blacks."
Sheridan Square has on stage
Brendon Behan's "The Hostage."
Circle in the Square has Thorn-
ton Wilder's "Plays for Bleeker
Street: Infancy, Childhood and
Lust."
The American Shakespeare Fes-
tival in Stratford, Conn., is fea-
turing Helen Hayes and Maurice
Evans.
For the Broadway shows take a
look at the ads on the subways
you will almost certainly ride.
Free Concertl
In the music world there are the
many free and almost free con-
certs always around New York..
Jazz. There's plenty of it. A lit-
tle looking and a lot of money will
allow you to see Brubeck, Lambert,
Hendricks and Bavan, Thelonious
Monk, Coleman Hawkins, Eric
Dolphy, and more.
At Gerde's Folk City are Mikef
Seeger and Hedy West. Take your
choice. All kinds, all beats, allt
prices.
If you want something really
different and exciting try "The1
Premise" or "The Second City."
The Second City was the original1
stomping ground for Mike Nichols
and Elaine May and The Premise1
is the funniest livingest t heatret
around and all improvised to yourt
orders on the spot.r

Venezuelan students at the Uni-
versity as part of the "Exchange
of Persons" program of the State
Department gave an off-the-cuff
survey yesterday of their impres-
sions on this country and its poli-
cies.
"La cosa mas feas" (the ugliest
thing) at first glance was the
state's sales taxes, which, they
said, "has poor people paying un-
fair disproportionate amounts."
Venezuelan News
Other impressions:
-"La gente no es feliz"-the peo-
ple aren't happy here. Instead,
they seem preoccupied with their
work, and devoid of savoir faire;
-"Poco refinado," unrefined,
are the folk here. Their food, even
in good restaurants, is only third-
rate, so far as taste is concerned.
(But on the other hand, our
candies and cakes are good.)
-Public services are magnifi-
La ler Scores
Death Claims
Of Lake Erie
Predictions of the death of Lake
Erie are somewhat premature,'
Prof. Karl F. Lagler, chairman of
the fisheries department, said re-
cently.
Lakes-like babies-die a little
every day of their lives until they
expire, he explained.
"Recently there have been re-
peated reports that Lake Erie is
a dying lake. True though this
statement is, it is equally true of
a brand new lake just as it is
true of a baby from the moment
of birth," Prof. Lagler asserted.
The normal maturation process
started when it was a new lake,
full of glacial meltwater, chem-;
ically almost as pure as rainwater
and low in the chemical nutrients
necessary to support life, he con-
tinued.
"With the growth, death and
decay of many generations of life,
lake water typically becomes more
and more fertile. Ultimately, the
lake fills in-then it is dead. Lake
Erie, although technically dying
is still the most alive and produc-
tive of the Great Lakes," he con-
tinued.
Prof. Lagler cited the report of
Ohio bioligists ofa large hatch
of perch in Lake Erie this year
while commercial fishermen, he
noted, are picking up large num-
bers of walleyes from the spring
1961 hatch.
"Thus, rather than to claim that
Lake Erie is a dying lake, which
added nothing to existing know-s
ledge, a truer statement is thatt
it is a changing lake-or even ar
lake threatened by disease," he

cent, and so is general cleanliness.
But the cost of living is too high.
Worst complaint was that "la
gente aqui no se hace amiga de
nadie'"-people here don't make
friends with anyone. "'We don't
have time to,' you say, but in Ven-
ezuela friends of mine get up at 5
a.m., don't get home from work
and school until after 8 p.m.-but
still find time for being more
friendly."
Or: "People here are disciplined,
serious. But they are also unre-
fined; they still wear coonskin
caps which need to be shaved off."
Invading Cuba was bad, all
agreed, but worse was choosing
"the fool's way of doing it." As to
whether to break off contacts with
Cuba now, "Only the most insignif-
icant of Latin American countries
have done so. Mexico, Brazil and
Argentina, for example, have not
-nobody likes to be told what to
do about such things."
What Is the Alliance?
The Aliance for Progress is a
failure, says one. "No it's not, it's
a myth," a second says. "How can
it be a failure when it hasn't yet
started,?
"Latin American countries need
development and capital. These
have to come from the outside.
Alliance for Progress m o n e y
shouldn't be going to hospitals or
housing developments, but to re-
productive investments that cre-
ate jobs."
What could the U.S. do to im-
prove its Latin American relations?
"First: make the Alliance for
Progress truly effective, to stim-
ulate economic growth in the coun-
tries concerned;
"And second: have much more
cultural interchange; Latin Amer-
icans try to see foreigners in their
own terms, and North Americans
should do the same.

By LEWIS GULICK
Associated Press News Analyst
WASHINGTON - Admist this
hemisphere's dedication to non-
intervention - in principle - the
United States is wading hip deep
in the internal affairs of Latin
American countries from Cape
Horn to the Caribbean.
For instance, the state depart-
ment made no attempt to deny
this week that it has warned rebel
army leaders in Argentina against
setting up a military dictatorship.
By the end of this week, the
department plans to resume dip-
lomatic relations and aid to Peru
-but only after pressuring for a
wide range of pledges by the Lima
junta on how it will treat the
Peruvian people.
Chop Off Aid
In dictator-ridden Haiti, United
States aid has been chopped off
with no sign yet when it might
be renewed.
Extending the long arm of Yan-
kee influence into the inner
reaches of Latin lands is hardly
new. The basic aim of Washington
strategists is still- the same: to
promote what they consider the
best interests of the United States.
What is new for the 1960's, as
against the old style gunboat dip-
lomacy and a later era of good
neighborliness without many
strings, is a close linking of United
States diplomatic pressure with
a big flow of dollar help.
Goals Effects
The announced goals of the 10-
year, $20-billion Alliance for Pro-
gress program themselves reach
deeply into the domestic affairs
of the aid-receiving countries. In
President John F. Kennedy's def-
inition of the massive assistance
effort for the Americas, the aim
is to show "economic progress and
social justice can best be achieved
by free men working within a

framework of democratic institu-
tions."
Translated into terms of United
States security, this means the
Washington strategists now figure
a rising, shared prosperity in Latin
America under popular govern-
ments is the best counter to dan-
gerous Communist penetration in-
to America's home ground.
The ticklish question is how to
apply this leverage without mak-
ing things worse. Many of the
elite now high in the saddle in
Latin America don't see how they
would fare better with reforms
for the masses.
Dislike of "intervention" from
the outside, especially from the
powerful "Colossus of the North,"
is deeply ingrained among the
nationalistic Latins.
Fear Outsiders
Yet, as one of the inner circle
of United States policymakers,
Deputy Under Secretary of State
'U. Alexis Johnson, recently said,
"The measures we advocate may
strike at the very foundations of
theseaspects ofda country's social
structure and domestic economy
on which rests the basis of the
government's control."
"This calls for the utmost skills
of our profession," the long-
experienced diplomat said, "for it
is always a difficult task and
sometimes an impossible one."
1 U.S. Tight Rope
The Peruvian case illustrates
the tightrope act United States
diplomacy must go through to get
something done.
Months before the Lima coup,
the United States had warned the
military against a takeover. After
the July 18 coup, the United States
promptly suspended diplomatic re-
lations and sizable aid.
Since then, the junta has prom-
ised to hold free elections, has
restored civil liberties to a sig-

nificant degree and has freed ex-
president Manuel Prado.
Washington has now decided
this is about all it can hope for
at this time, and is preparing to
turn on again the twin spigots of
dollars and diplomatic recogni-
tion.
NSA Congress
Begins Debate
About Issues
(Continued from Page 1)
If the Congress follows tra-
ditional patterns, delegates will
be attracted to the various ucli-
tical camps and plan strategy to
pass legislation and elect national
officers.
Resolutions passed by preceeding
Congresses have been more left
of center than right and conserva-
tive student groups have attacked
several aspects of NSA.
Liberal student leaders are ex-
pecting vigorous opposition to
their legislation from such or-
ganizations as Young Americans
for Freedom and the Committee
for a Reformed National Student
Organization.
Outgoing NSA president Edward
Garvey, who willdofficially chair
the Congress, called upon par-
ticipants to face "the challenge of
leading the student community in
defining and acting upon issues
facing American higher education,
a society which is struggling to
translate quality of opportunity
from theory into fact and world
where student in the emergent
areas are confronted with the task
of making democracy, social re-
form and university autonomy a
living reality."

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETI'N
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METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER presents in association with SEVEN ARTS PRODUCTIONS
JAMES 8.HARRIS and STANLEY KUBRICKS -mIrI
S~tarmng JAMES MASON - SHELLEY WINTERS
PETER SELLERS .as'QuiIyf and Introducing SUE LYON as
STARTING FRIDAY

Suggest Keeping
of University Zoo
ANN ARBOR-Councilman Eu-
nice L. Burns offered a resolution
of regret at the loss of the Univer-
sity's zoo consisting of ten animals
during the last council meeting as
Republican Henry A. Aquinto sug-
gested asking the Regents to keep
the zoo if possible.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
*esponsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m., two days preceding
publication.
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 15
General Notices
Any Summer Session Student who is
planning to attend the fal semester
and does not have a student identifica-
tion card may obtain one by applying
at Window A, lobby of the Admin. Bldg.,
hours 8-12 and 1-5, Mon. through Fri.
All Students must have an I.D. card
prior to registration this fall.
.Events
Doctoral Examination for James Wal-
ter Ney, Eng. Language & Lit.; thesis:
"A Morphological and Syntactic Analy-

DIAL
5-6290

MICHIGRM

.... ..

-i

I

said.
Prof. Lagler warned that pol-
lution is being thrusted into the
west end of the lake, changing
both water quality and fish popu-
lation.

sis of English Compositions Written by
Native Speakers of Japanese," Thurs.,
Aug. 16, 2601 Haven Hall, at 2:00 p.m.
Chairman, A. H. Marckwardt.
Doctoral Examination for Chikashi
Moriguchi, Economics; thesis: "Manu-
facturers' Short-Term Production De-
cisions under the Different Phases of
Business Cycles as of Shown by Select-
ed Industries 1949-1960," Thurs., Aug.
16, 2A Economics Bldg., at 10:00 a.m.
Chairman, D. B. Suits.
Degree Recital: Bertha Hargarty, or-
ganist, will present a recital on Fri.,
Aug. 17, 8:30 p.m., Hill Aud., in partial
fulfillment of the requirements for the
degree Master of Music. Miss Hagarty
will play the compositions of Johann
Sebastian Bach, Sigfrid Karg-Elert, and
Olivier Messiaen. Her recital is open to
the public.
Pakistan Students Association will
celebrate the 15th anniv. of Pakistan's
independence on Sat., Aug. 18 at 7:30
p.m. at YM-YWCA. The program con-
sists of movies, a talk by Richard Ni-
heoff, coordinator of Pakistan Project
in the Office of the Dean of Interna-
tional Affairs at Mich. State Univ.,
and Pakistani, refreshments. All are cor-
dially invited.
Placement
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT INTER-
VIEW-Seniors & grad students, make
appointments by signing schedule on
bulletin board outside Engrg. Place-
ment Office, Room 128-H West Engrg.
for the following:
THURS., AUG 16-
Bell Aerosystems Co., Buffalo, N.Y.-
Require all.degrees in AE, EE, EM, &
ME and a BS in E Physics. Will do re-
search, development & design work.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Archer Daniels Midland Co. (ADM),
Minneapolis, Minn.-Seeking BS or MS
level Chemical Sngnr. with 0 to 2 yrs.
exper. for Newark, N.J. Chemical Plant.
Should have strong interest in produc-
tion supervision.
Kelly Girl Service, Inc., Detroit, Mich.
-Recent grad, man or possibly woman,
for Junior Accounting Management.
BA, possible Econ., with some course

University Musical Society
Presentations - 1962-1963
CHORAL UNION SERIES

DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA.

. . . . 2:30, Sunday, October 7

work in Accounting & Statistics. 1 or 2
yrs. gen'l business exper. Oppor. for
advancement to general mgmt. position
for graduate interested in bus, career..
Tridea Electronics, Inc., South Pasa-
dena, Calif. - Positions for Electrical
Engnrs. for various phases of Design in
electronic systems development. Also
Reliability Group Head & Ass't. All re-
quire BS degree minimum & from 2 to
5 yrs. exper.
County of Westchester, New York-
Openings in field of social work for
recent grads. BA degree-any field. New
York residence waived. Apply by Sept.
4 for exam in Oct.
Sperry Electronic Tube Div., Gaines-
ville, Fla --Openings as follows: 1) Mar-
keting Rep.-Engrg. or Physics degree,
BS, with tech, sales exper. 2) Equip-
ment Engnr.-BSME. 3) Environmental
Test Engnr.-BSME plus exper. 4) Proj-
ect Engnrs.-MS or PhD in EE or Phys-
ics. 5) Buyer-Bus. Ad. grad with exper.,
buying machined parts.
City of Muskegon Heights, .Mich.-
Director of Urban Renewal to adminis-
ter the planning & carrying out of a
Community Renewal Prog. Exper. in
Urban Renewal, City planning, housing,
public admin. or municipal govt. pre-
ferred, although trng. & other types of
admin. exper. considered.
Brunswick Corp., Chicago, 11.-Per-
sonnel Ass't., Bowling Division, for work
in employment, wage & salary admin.,
training & other related personnel
functions. BA or MA, Indu'1 Relations
pref., with 0-5 yrs. exper. in personnel
field. Age 25-30.
For further information, please con-
tact General Div., Bureau of Appts., 3200
SAB, Ext. 3544.
Teaching vacancies for the school year
1962-63.
Kanakee, III.-Jr. HS Engi/French.
River Grove, Ill. (Dist. 851)-Sp.Corr.
Baltimore, Md. (Samuel Ready Girl's
School)-HS Engl., Sch. Newspaper,
Sch. Annual.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Graduate Outing Club, Hiking, Swim-
ming, Canoeing, etc., Every Sunday
thru September, 1:45 p.m., Rackham
Bldg., Huron St. Entrance.
DIAL 8-6416
ENDING TONIGHT
WHAT
WAS ,
THE
STARTIeNG
TRUTH -
ABOUT.
LoCARNO
j FILM FESTIVAL,
and "''.An
RIO DE JANEIRO EMBASSY

So. Orange & Maplewood, N.J.-HS
Engl., Math, Fre/Span.,
Bellport, long Island, N.Y. (Central
School Dist. No. 4)-1st gr., 2nd gr.,
7th gr. Engl., 9th gr. Engl., 7th gr.
Sci./Math, HS French, HS French/
Span.; Sch. Nurse/Teacher.
Cleveland, O.. (Anti - Tuberculosis
League)-Director of Patient-Family Ed-
ucation.
Jeromesville, O. (Hillsdale Local Sch.
Dist.)-Elem. Voc. Mus.
Norwood, O.-Sp. & Hear. Ther., Psy-
chologist, 9th gr. Algebra.
Tiffin, 0. (Seneca County Scba.) -
Span/Engl., Span/PE, Elem., Math/Sci.,
Ind. Arts, Ind. Arts/Hist., Engl/French.
Hartland, Wis. (U n iversit y Lake
School)-Sci./Math.
* * *
For additional information contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 3200 SAB,
663-1511, Ext. 3547.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
Indian River Inn, Indian River, Mich.
-Mrs. P. DeVore is very much in need
of men & women as waiters and wai-
tresses, plus one man and woman as
cocktail waiter and waitress, to begin
immediately, continuing until begin-
ning of school. Room, board, large tips.
Call her collect ADams 8-9343.
A- a
Wednesday and Thursday
EXODUS
starring SAL MINEO
PETER LAWFORD
PAUL NEWMAN
EVA MARIE SAINT
Show at 9:00
QiIjlJI~lI~~1t~~ii111II
DIAL 5-6290
Positively Ends Thursday
"IF YOU WANT TO SEE
'THE MUSIC MAN' AT
IT'S FINEST, GO SEE
THE MOVIE VERSION!"
-Ron Martin, Free Press
THE MOST MARVELOUS MOVIE EVER MADE I
FROM THE PLAY THAT KEPT PLAYING6FOREVER I
H9E TPRE?( }SHI ^ S1RE fS BUY fHU(T
ClrE U IU i 1'~Pt~iL[ [9R0 ECHiM>R "
vt'sisioiWANiER BROS.

"LA TRAVIATA" (Verdi). . . . . . . . . Friday, October 19
Goldovsky Grand Opera Theater
FRENCH NATIONAL ORCHESTRA . . . . . Wednesday, October 24
UDAY SHANKAR HINDU DANCE COMPANY. . . Tuesday, November 6
LENINGRAD PHILHARMONIC . . . . . . . Monday, November 12
"MARRIAGE OF FIGARO" (Mozart) . . . Saturday, November 17
New York City Opera Company
GERALD SOUZAY, Baritone . a . . . . . Tuesday, January 8
PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA . . . . Thursday, February 14
TOKYO CLASSICAL BALLET, "Komaki". . . . 2:30, Sunday, March 3
TORONTO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA . . . . . Tuesday, March 12
SEASON TICKETS: $20.00-$17.00-$15.00-$12.00-$10.00
EXTRA SERIES'

Ii

g

I1

"THE SOUND OF MUSIC" . a. .
Rodgers & Hammerstein musical
NATIONALBALLET OF CANADA. .

. Wednesday, October 31

. . a . Friday, November 9

THE
,UIS E FERNAND
RAINER- GRAVEl
M ILIZA
V/ADI 11

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DIAL . f I ?I Itl llli i Ull' IIIL " VIII
I II
2-6264 a 'lt '111y, {{ ,' IIII I III'
I

"RIGOLETTO"(Verdi). . . . . . . 2:30, Sunday, November 18
New York City Opera Company
NDR SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA OF HAMBURG. . Wednesday, January 16
BIRGIT NILSSON, Soprano . . . . . . . . . Monday, March 18

Shows at 1:00-2:55
4:55-7:00 and 9:15
Feature at 1:00-2:55
5:05-7:10 and 9:25

HELD OVER THRU SATURDAY
Their nights are as fast and frantic as their days!

11

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