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August 09, 1962 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1962-08-09

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 9, 1962

THE MICHIG~AN D1AILY

'bir-4v

._ a _ _ . .

-PAGE'THREEm

s

GIFTED TEACHERS:
Trow Notes Quality
Of U.S. Educators

In a recent article in the Uni-
versity's "School of Education Bul-
letin," Prof. William Trow, a mem-
ber of the department asserts that
the "gifted" teacher has never
existed, but that despite this, the
quality of education will not suffer
in the long run.
A truly gifted teacher would
necessarily have to be one who
can do all things pertinent to
her job well.
"Of course there are many good
teachers, but they are rarely good
at everything. They may be good
at explaining things, but slow at
returning corrected papers. They
may have an excellent French
pronunciation and a charming
smile but be unable to keep or-
der," he asserts.
Quality Varies
Prof. Trow admits that these
"good" teachers are sometimes
thought of as being gifted, but
questions how many anyone has
had during his educational career.

"Some people can recall one or
two they have had - although
their classmates might not agree.
Pupil characterizations of their
teachers have run the gamut from
'sour puss,' 'old meanie,' 'crab,'
'crook' and 's.o.b.' to 'sweety pie,'
'mamma's boy' and 'old hickory'!"
Teaching Machines
This difference in opinion on
the part of students may find its
end in the near future "with the
development of individualized in-
struction that programmed learn-
ing is bringing within the realm
of actuality" since it may be pos-
sible to develop instruments cap-
able of measuring teachers abili-
ties directly and to provide in-
struction at the point where each
pupil needs it, allowing him to go
on from there, Prof. Trow states.
"When this is done, it will be
possible to make intelligent udge-
inents about the preparation of
those who will be responsible for
the different teaching tasks," he
adds.
'The Truth'
"The truth is that the teacher's
job is an impossible one-some doa
it surprisingly well, all things con-,
sidered, but they do not do it
well enough.
"No one person can be a com-
plete subject-matter specialist," he
philosophized.J
to, offer .Bell
Concert Todayf
Compositions by J. S. Bach,y
Rachmaninov, Percival Price and1
composors of the 17th Century will
be presented today at 7:15 p.m.
in an "Extraordinary Bell Con-1
cert" presented at Burton Tower
under the auspices of the musict
school.
The Zvon Ringers, a group of
music students, carillonneurs Al-
bert Gerkin and Sidney Giles, withf
Price conducting, will play the<
Baird Carrillon at the recital. 1

Interlochen
Teaches Arts
To Students
There's music in the air in
Michigan this summer, and it's
coming from two University "cam-
puses."
About 400 students are currently
attending the music schools' sum-
mer session on the central campus,
and about 220 are studying musical
instruments or theory in the Uni-
versity division at the National
Music Camp at Interlochen.
"The Ann Arbor classes are well
known, but I think far fewer per-
sons know that the University is
active in teaching at Interlochen
which, perhaps has become better
known as a high school level
camp," James Wallace, dean of
the music school, said.
Varied Arts Courses
"At Interlochen, we teach
courses in music, drama, art,
dance, speech and camp counseling
--all under the director of a fac-
ulty and staff of 35 people, headed
by Eugene Troth of the music
education department.
Interlochen has become well
known throughout the country and
each year many talented students
in elementary, high school and
from some colleges apply for ad-
mission. Some special talent (gen-
erally in a performing art) must
be exhibited.
After Scholarships
There are numerous scholar-
ships for students unable to af-
ford the Interlochen fees.
Monday, President John F. Ken-
nedy was visited by the National
High School Symphony Orchestra
when it played on the White
House lawn. The group tradition-
ally goes on tour each summer,
playing before a variety of celeb-
rities, sometimes in foreign coun-
tries.
The University currently is ad-
vising and consulting with Prof.-
professor - emeritus Joseph E.
Maddy, camp founder, on the es-
tablishment of the Interlochen
Arts Academy, which would be a
highly specialized high school em-
phasizing music and the related
arts, but including all other
courses approriate to the modern
high school cirriculum.

-Daily-Michael de Gaetano
IN A RUT-These workers were excavating land in construction work which will enable the Water-
man Power Station to deliver an additional 8,000 kilowatts to various buildings on East University
Street, including East and West Engineering, East Medical Bldg., the new Physics Astronomy
Bldg., East Quadrangle, and the Randall Laboratory. The work, which should be completed by Sep-
tember, consists of laying a new cable the length of the street. Currently, the power station is over-
loaded, and it was feared that the power needed by the Physics Astronomy Bldg. would prove too
much for the existing supply.t
SHEFFIELD EXCHANGE PLAN:
School Helps To Send Students Abroad

By BARBARA LAZARUS
The University offers its stu-
dents a unique six week program
in speed reading and better study
habits.
Located at 1610 Washtenaw, this
college service is a branch of the
special studies division of the psy-
chology department. A staff of
trained personnel instruct the 250-
300 students presently enrolled in
the course.
The program, established in
1952, is designed to help the col-
lege student meet problems which
are often encountered in aca-
demic work. It helps to speed up
the extremely slow reader and,
even more important, improve his
learning efficiency and retention.
Bad Readers
There is much flexibility in say-
ing what makes a poor reader.
Many poor readers read quickly,
but miss the context of what they
read. Others read so slowly they
lose the train of thought or fail
to finish assignments. A person
reads material at different speeds:
when he reads a novel he reads
differently than when he reads a
complicated textbook. There is no
basis for saying every person must
read all material quickly.
Although it is difficult to deter-
mine the average reader's rate, the
national average is somewhere
around 250 words per minute. The
college student's range is probably
between 275-300 words per minute.
Two-Hour Session
The student enrolled in the
course attends two hour classes a
week and also visits the reading
lab for a one hour practice period.
He should apply what he learns
in class while studying for his
regular courses. There is no pri-
vate tutoring; however, individual
problems can be dealt with.
The classes instruct the student
in proper ways to improve his
reading. These techniques are con-
stantly changing with more re-
rearch on the processes of reading.
The course relies on special
reading machines which have a
metal shutter to cover the material

Powerful Employment

IMPROVEMENT CENTER:
Give Reading Betterment
Service for' U' Students

already read. The speed of the
machine can be set for any reading
rate. The reading comprehension
of the students is checked con-
stantly during the six weeks.
Improvement Varies
The improvement at the end of
the course varies from student to
student. Lately students have im-
proved as much as double their
previous speed. Some students im-
prove from a half to a whole letter
grade in their University courses
after the reading course.
This unique service is offered
to any University student who feels
he would like to give the time
in improving his reading.
-:4- DIAL 2-6264
i Ii 'l
SHOWS START AT 1:00-
2:00-4:00-7:00 and 9:15
FEATURE STARTS AT 1:00
2;55-5:05-7:10 and 9:25

By ROBERT WAZEKA
Prospective teachers have a uni-
que opportunity available to them,
due to the work of the Univer-
sity's education school.
A second semester program at
Sheffield University in England,
which began 10 years ago as a
faculty exchange program, now
allows candidates for teaching cer-
tificates to gain practical teaching
experience in England. American
students participating in the pro-
gram in Britain have taught at
nearly all levels, ranging from
elementary school to the univer-
sity.
American students enjoyed
themselves immensley; found the
English people friendly; discovered
it relatively easy to adapt to the

conditions; and were reluctant to1
leave. They were able to view thei
United States from a different
perspective through the British
press and were able to gain anE
insight into the British way oft
life. Of particular advantage to
the students was the inclusion ofz
their trip on their scholastic rec-
ords.
Ruscoe Ribbed
Gordon Ruscoe, Grad, expressed
special interest in the British edu-
cational system. He found the
people friendly and easy to getc
along with. The people never made
him feel like an outsider and in
fact, ribbed him about certainx
aspects of American life.
British students seemed to be
better informed about the United
States Presidential campaign than
American students. Students of all
beliefs, including Communist and
fascist, are extremely active on
the Sheffield campus. The British
educational system stresses in-
dividual reading and research
rather than class recitations.
Prestige Pub
Much of the British students'
social life is centered in the local
pubs, since the drinking age is 18.
However, these pubs can boast
higher prestige in the eyes of

British society than the bar does
in ours and is usually the home
for games of darts, scrabble, chess
and discussions of all types. Dating
seems to be the exception rather
than the rule.
The University, because of fine
results the first year of the pro-
gram, continued the exchange last
year, sending nine students to
Sheffield.
If continued for 1963-64, juniors
and seniors will be able to apply.
Selections are made on the basis
of academic record, faculty recom-
mendations, possible contributions
to the Sheffield community, and
personal interviews.

1

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
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(Continued from Page 2)

ALL SEATS RESERVED,
$2-$3-$4-$5-$6
Tickets on sale a,
DISCOUNT RECORDS
S337So. Main St., Ann Arbor1
MAIL ORDERS ACCEPTED,
enclose self-addressed
envelope.

partial fulfillment of the degree Doc-
tor of Musical Arts, Horace H. Rackham
School of Graduate Studies. He will
play the compositions of Mozart,
Brahms, and Beethoven. His recital is
open to the public.
Doctoral Recital: Raymond Lynch,
oboist, will present a recital on Fri.,
Aug. 10, 4:15 p.m. in Lane Hall Aud.

Last 2 weeks of
/2-Year
CLEARANCE
Our Shop Is A Bargain Hunter's Paradise
All Summer Dresses, Many Dark Spring and
Fall Types, All Spring Coats, Summer, Handbags.
Groups of Jewelry, Girdles, Bras, Gloves.
Must go to make room for our Fall Stocks.
Rack after rack of
Dresses
Originally $10.95
to $49.95
Now $5 to $25 Summer Bags
Jewelry-Bras
Shorter Sizes Girdles-Hats
101/ to 26/2;
Petite sizes 10-22; and Whimsies!
t egular sizes 8-44;
Junior sizes 7-15;
Tall 10-18. now at
Unbelievable
Drop in LOW
between exams PRICES
for
cool relaxing
shopping

in partial fulfillment of the require-1
ments for the degree Doctor of MusicalI
Arts, Horace H. Rackham School of
Graduate Studies. He will be accom-
panied by Patricia Parker, pianist and
harpsichordist. Compositions he will
play are by Mozart, Sammartini, Fon-
tayne, Damase and Piston. Open to the
public.
Astronomy Department Visitors' Night:
Fri., Aug. 10, 8:30 p.m., Room 2003 An-
gell Hall. Dr. Lawrence Aller will speak
on "Galaxies." After the lecture the
Student Observatory on the fifth floor
of Angell Hail will be open for in-
spection and for telescopic observa-
tions of the Moon, Saturn and the
Andromeda galaxy.
Children welcomed, but must be ac-
companied by adults.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
Janz & Knight, Birmingham, Mich.-
Career opportunity for Bus. Ad. major
desiring to become a Certified Public
Accountant. Exper. in public or pri-
vate acc't, helpful, although not re-
quired. Must be under 30 & in a non-
active military service classification.
W. R. Grace & Co., Clarksville, Md.
-Current openings for Chem. majors
in following positions: Inorganic or
Physical-Inorganic Chemists; Physical
Chem.; Analytical Chem.; Information
Center Head; Reference Librarian; &
Literature Scientist.
Local Vicinity-Position as Personal
Property Appraiser for grad with degree
in Accounting. No exper. required. Will
verify personal property statements, dis-
cover new personal property & main-
tain personal prop, files.
Physicians' Planning Service Corp.,
Detroit, Mich.-Man to sell life insur-
ance to the young doctor market in
Ann Arbor. Pref. Bus. Ad. degree but
Liberal Arts acceptable. Two yrs. exper.
in any field, OR possibly recent grad
if he has shown leadership in college
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
French Club, Weekly Meeting, August
9, 3-5 p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg.
AIR CONDITIONED

bkgd. & has had some public speaking
bkgd. Should be in mid-twenties.
Washington State Civil Service-Child
welfare Executive - Completion of 2
yrs. grad trng. in school of social work
& at least 4 yrs. full-time employment
in public or private agency, providing
child welfare case work services in posi-
tions carrying responsibility of a con-
sultative nature or prog. admin.
For further information, please call
General Div., Bureau of Appts., 3200
SAB, Ext. 3544.
Part-Time
Employment
The following part-time jobs are
available. Applications for these jobs
can be made in the Part-time Place-
ment Office, 2200 Student Activities
Bldg., during the following hours: Mon.
thru Fri. 8 a.m. til 12 noon and 1:30 til
5 p m.
Employers desirous of hiring students
for partitime or full-time temporary
work, should contact Bob Hodges, Part-
time Interviewer at NO 3-1511, ext. 3553.
Students desiring miscellaneous odd
jobs should consult the bulletin board
in Room 2200, daily.
MALE
1-Good commercial artist for news-
paper advertising. Part-time or full-
time.
80-Psychological Subjects. Must be stu-
dents. At least one, 2 hour session.
FEMALE
1-Good commercial artist for news-
paper advertising. Part-time or full-
time,
1-Food supervisor. Degree in dietetics
or equivalent experience. Monday
thru Friday, 4 p.m, to 8 p.m.
DOMINICK'S
PIZZAS-SUBS
812 Monroe
WE DELIVER
NO 2-5414
'U1L1A"
retion 4. modern coaing
DIAL 5-6290
HELD
OVER! +
UOOdith 2 W//son.
@"Pthe
A 1.,

r

TONIGHT

TOMORROW
OP ERAS DOUBLE BILL

__ __ _. _.__ _ -f l

2

GREAT

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS, DEPT. OF SPEECH
PE D present
OPERA DEPT., SCHOOL OF MUSIC
in

Puccini's

al

DIAL 8-6416
* TODAY ONLY
FAMOUS
OPERETTA
'SERIES
"GIRL
OF THE
GOLDEN
WEST"

C

C~C

Pergolesi's
La SErva Padrona
PERFORMANCES THRU FRIDAY

I

I

II a-'.-.

I II

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