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June 26, 1962 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1962-06-26

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IT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY.JUNE 26,

LASH APPROPRIATION:
Legislature May Force Veterans Center Closing

(Continued from Page 1)
Warner has claimed that the
center "in my. opinion is overly
expensive," and that "state veter-
ans groups don't want to continue
it,,
He also reiterated a statement
he has made previously: "There
has been lots of confusion on what
is taking place. In particular, vet-
erans' groups in Washtenaw Coun-
ites Grades,
U'Growth
University President - Emeritus
Alexander Grant Ruthven com-
pared the University of today with
that which he knew and comment-
ed upon what it will likely become
in several years in an interview
before a recent ceremonial dinner
in his honor.
He said that the tendency today
to put increasing emphasis on
grades is unfortunate and added
that he feels "we have to realize
that grades are not the only cri-
terion for judging a student's ex-
cellence . . a fairer way would
be to 'consult the opinions of peo-
ple who have known the student's
background.",
Teen-age Projection
He also reflected on the chang-
ing student attitudes. "It seems to
me many students here now with
the idea that it's their job to re-
organize the University - they
come up with the weirdest ideas
. , now you see .fellows going off
the deep end and calling it aca-=
demic freedom. They call them-
selves young adults, but they are
really just projecting teen-age
thinking, he said.
During the Ruthven administra-
tion, which lasted from 1929 to
1951, research was emphasized.
Ruthven commented that while he
was a student research was limit-
ed to instructors' spare time, and
that they were not paid for such
work.
Part of Program
"We gradually developed the
idea that research should be part
of a well-balanced program of in-
struction. That was the beginning
of the encouraging of the original
investigations which . .. have run
away with the ball at times."
He speculated that research
could eventually pull many teach-
ers from the classroom and sug-
gested that "research might better
be done in the labs of industries."

ty have been misinformed and mis-
led by some people at the Univer-
sity."
However, Dr. M. M. Frolich, di-
rector of the VRC, has some dif-
fering opinions. "It would be a
tragic loss for the University and
the state if the center were not
continued," he said.
Most Advanced
"It is the most advanced psychi-
atric treatment facility in the
state, and one of the two or three
best in the country." It would be
almost impossible to start out a
completely new center of this sort;
even the well-established psychi-
atric clinics have equipment and
personnel shortages."
The VRC treats from 275 to 300
patients per year, at an average
cost of $10,000 for each occupied
patient bed, as compared to $2,-
000 in state hospitals.
But, Dr. Frolich said, for five
times the cost, "50 times as much
treatment is given. For each case
of chronic mental illness we cure,
the sta'te is saved a total of $70,-
000."
Sharp Blow
Dr. Raymond W. Waggoner,
chairman of the psychiatry depart-
ment, added that the disbanding
of the center would be a sharp

blow to the training of qualified
psychiatric personnel, in "short
supply" around the country. "One
quarter of the psychiatry depart-
ment's training program involves
working at the VRC," he pointed
out.
Thirty-three in-patients and 70
out-patients currently are being
treated. The $50,000 "phase-out"
appropriation would be used to
complete the treatment for these
patients.
Rep. Gilbert Bursley (R-Ann Ar-
bor), a supporter of the VRC, said
that if the amendment is success-
ful, but only for a fraction of
$346,000, "perhaps the Legislature
would allow paying patients to en-
ter, so that some of the operating
expenses could be defrayed." Treat-
ment for the patients, who are
veterans of World War II and the
Korean War, is free at present.
Dispute Claim
William A. Rose, commander of
a group comprising 17 veterans or-
ganizations in Washtenaw County,
disputed Warner's claims about
veterans' opinions toward the cen-
ter. "Veterans as a composite group
are absolutely not in favor of
closing the VRC," he said.
Rose and Dr. Waggoner ex-
pressed puzzlement over the ap-

parent change in attitude by War-
ner toward the center. They said
that Warner had promised "he
would give as much support as he
could to the VRC."
The representative said Friday
that when the 13-member House
Ways and Means Committee was
debating the VRC appropriation,
only he and one other member
favored the traditional sum, with
the other 11 men voting to make
the slash. "And it wasn't a parti-
san issue at all," he said.
Some time after the committee's
deliberations, Warner met on June

6 with spokesmen for six veterans
organizations. At this meeting,
Warner said, the veterans criticiz-
ed the center, and made the
charge of "being misinformed and
misled."
However, Rose claimed that
Warner pressured the veterans into
making these statements. "Since
then, several of the commanders
who voted for dissolution of the
VRC have retracted."
As to being "misinformed and
misled," Dr. Frolich said that no
veterans group or patient had ever
made this complaint to him.

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By JOSEPH FELDMAN
Interest centered on the possible
connection between cancer and
smoking at the first day of the
Institute on Cancer Control yes-
terday.
In an afternoon paper entitled
"The Epidemiology of Cancer,"
Prof. Abraham M. Lilienfeld of
Johns Hopkins University cited the
great increase in mortality among
men from lung cancer.
'Not Single Disease'
He also said that, "Cancer is
not a single disease, particularly
from an epidemiological viewpoint;
it is a family of related diseases."
Prof. Lilienfeld noted that cancers
are affected by such factors as
socioeconomic status, living habits,
and genetic factors.
Three major reports were made
available. In a statement of the
United States Public Health Serv-
ice Dr. Leroy E. Burney concluded
that, "The weight of evidence at
present implicates smoking as the

principal etiological factor in the
increased incidence of lung can-
cer."
Dorn Study
A report of Harold F. Dorn said
that a study of 200,000 life insur-
a n c e policyholders contributed
"striking evidence" of a link be-
tween smoking and lung cancer,
cardiovascular disease, ulcers, and
cirrhosis of the liver.
A paper of Dr. Lewis C. Robbins
of Washington indicated that one
still should not be convinced by
present evidence.
Haber To Extend
Federal Service
Prof. William Haber, chairman'
of the economics department, has
agreed to serve for another year
on the National Public Advisory
Committee on Area Readjustment,
an agency dealing with unemploy-
ment and underemployment.

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