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July 08, 1961 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1961-07-08

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, JULY 8, 1961,

I

PAGE POUR THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, JULY 8, 1961

k In ne .ar
by Brian MacClowry
Man In A Hurry
HAVE YOU EVER noticed how two letters can make the man? Now
this may seem like heresy, because until now it was thought that
clothes coudn't even do that. But the fact is two parts alphabet can
even set the mood.
The initials P.T. were made famous by a fellow who could sell a
Chevrolet to Henry Ford. W.C. became synonymous with laughter be-
cause a distinguished looking gentleman liked to make his nose look
bigger than it already was. And B.O. meant Sunday morning and
plenty of Dick Tracy.
On May 30, 1961, A.J. was born. Originally the letters belonged to a
man named Foyt. But now they'll just signal speed, because the good
looking Texan is a man in a hurry. But then he has to be. The Indian-
apolis "500" winner is one of those curious few who chooses to butter
his bread by driving cars around in circles at upwards of 150 miles-
per-hour. Which, come to think of it, is almost as dangerous as driving
the expressway at 5:00 p .m.
FOYT, who was in Grand Rapids last week for a turn with the
midgets, doesn't think it's nearly as dangerous. "I don't look at
automobile racing as being as dangerous as driving on the highway,"
he says. "In our business, at least, everyone is going the same way.
And they know what they're doing, which is more than I can say for
thedaverage driver. If I thought racing was dangerous I'd walk away
right now," Foyt insists.
This is precisely what his mother and father have been urging him
to do ever since he started driving midgets competitively around Hous-
ton, Tex., eight years ago at the age of 18.
When his father saw he wasn't going to be able to convince him,
he did what any ex-midget driver would do-he joined him. So the
elder Foyt was in the pits a ihonth ago when his son passed Eddie
Sachs on the 197th lap to take the checkered flag, and more import-
ant, approximately $100,000 in prize money.
IT HAD TO BE this way. You see, A.J. Sr. just doesn't believe in
social security.
Foyt won at Indianapolis in only his fourth start in the classic. Two
times he didn'e even finish. As a rookie in 1958, he couldn't complete
the first lap. He was involved in the 15 car wreck on the first turn that
took Pat O'Connor's life. In 1959 he came back to finish tenth behind
Roger Ward. And he was running in fourth place on the 165th lap in
1960 when his clutch failed and forced him to the sidelines.
This year he wanted to make sure his car would go the distance, so
he sacrificed the horses for stamina. As it turned out it was probably
the wisest decision he ever made. Ony 12 cars finished this year's race.
"LWENT BACK from a lay down engine to a straight up engine," he
said, while at the same time explaining that the lay down type may
give a car more speed but is not as dependable. "Other than that I
didn't experiment too much. I could have put more horsepower into
the car, but I wanted to make sure I finished instead."
Finish he did, 8% seconds ahead of Sachs. "It's a dream that every-
body hopes will come true,," he offered. "I think the big difference be-
tween this year and previous years was that I was calmer this year," he
said. "I wasn't pleased with my qualifying time (145.903), but I was
real satisfied with the way the car handled."
And then the soft talking Texan made a statement that will prob-
ably make Hoosier officials wish the lone star state had seceded in
1860. "This year Indianapolis was just like any other race to me," he
said.
FOYT, however, does see the Indiana classic as becoming more of an
international race in years to come, primarily because Australia's
World Road Racing champion, Jack Brabham, did so well this year
when he finished ninth.
"You have to hand it to Brabham," Foyt says. "He came over here
with a lot of prestige and very little experience with our type of hard-
top racing. And he did a real fine job. But Jack just didn't have the
horsepower to run with our cars.
"I look for more foreign interest in Indianapolis now," he said.
"The foreign drivers are not going to be so scared prestige-wise now
that Bragham has more or less broken the ice. I look for Ferrari to
come over next year with a car."
ALTHOUGH HE HAS miraculously never been disabled for any
of time due to an accident, Foyt has had his share of close calls on
the track. The two he remembers best took place at Indianapolis in
1959 and in Cincinnati earlier this year.
At Indianapolis, Foyt hit an oil slick at the 350 mile mark and
skidded some 1100 feet down the straight-away before regaining con-
trol of his car in time to finish tenth. In Cincinnati, he recalls, "I
popped a tire, went up in the air, and when I came down another
fellow ran over me. I didn't think I'd come out of that one."
What makes a man risk his life racing automobiles-besides money?
"It gets in your blood," Foyt explained. "It's just like football or base-
ball. Why does somebody play football or baseball," he asked quizzi-
cally.'
Foyt's rise to the top of his profession has been meteoric. In eight'
years he has won, or is winning, every major driving title. In 1960
he won the Eastern and Midwestern Sprint Car championship, and
finished 260 points ahead of Roger Ward for the United States Auto

Club (USAC) championship.
AT THE PRESENT time Foyt leads Eddie Sachs by 160 points for
the National Big Car title, and is 60 points ahead of Roger Mc-
Cluskey for the National Sprint Car championship.
"If I never win another race I couldn't holler," he says.
Actually, Foyt explained jokingly, this was all planned. "After I
won the 100-mile race at DuQuoin, Ill., in 1960 I told my crew 'It would
be nice to win the national championship wouldn't it?' Then in my
last five races I managed to win three and finish third twice to
overhaul Ward.
"After this I kiddingly told my crew, 'Now I'm going to win
Indianapolis.'"
Unfortunately, after this year it appears there won't be any
major driving titles left that Foyt hasn't won. He admits he's
running out of predictions.
But if anyone ever creates a Go-Kart national championship,
watch out! Chances are the young man from Houston will start
crystal gazing again.
Cupit Grabs St. Paul
Open Tourney Lead

Orioles Sweep Double Bill

THIRD TIME'S A CHARM:
Laver Beats McKinley for
IWimbledon Men's Net Title

By The Associated Press
BALTIMORE - A record-tying
grand slam homer by Jim Gentile
and complete-game pitching by
Chuck Estrada and Hal Brown
sparked the surging Baltimore
Orioles to a doubleheader victory
over the Kansas City Athletics last
night.
Baltimore won the, opener 6-2
on Gentile's fourth grand slam of
the season, a 400-foot pinch-hit
blast in the sixth inning, as Es-
trada hurled a six-hitter. Brown
blanked the A's 5-0 in the night-
cap on four hits.
The Orioles, who have won six
of their last seven games and 14
of, their last 18, moved into a
third-place tie with the Cleveland
Indians by sweeping the twin bill.
Gentile tied an American League
record with his grand slam.y
The pinch-hit appearance by
Gentile was his first time at bst
since he jammed his right thumb
in a collision at first base last
Tuesday.
* * *
Pirates 6, Braves 5
MILWAUKEE-Pittsburgh came
from behind with two runs in the
ninth inning off reliever veteran
Warren Spahn to beat the Milwau-
kee Braves 6-5.
The Braves held a 5-4 lead going
into the ninth as Henry Aaron
drove in all of Milwaukee's runs
with two homers.
Spahn came in to replace rookie
Tony Cloninger who had held the
Pirates to six hits in eight innings
but had occasional streaks of wild-
ness. Spahn was charged with the
defeat and now is 8-11 for the
season. The victory was Al McBean
who scored his first major league
victory.
Dick Schofield and Bill Mazer-
oski singled to start the final
inning. Pinch hitter Joe Chris-
topher beat out a perfect bunt
down the third base line and when
Felix Mantilla threw past first, for
an error, Schofield and Mazeroski
scored.
* * *.
Yanks 14, Red Sox 3
NEW YORK - Elston Howard
drove in four runs and Bobby
Richardson and Roger Maris each
Major League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE

banged in three as the New York4
Yankees ran up their top run total.
of the season and clobbered the1
Boston Red Sox 14-3 behind south-
paw Bud Daley.;
Only Mickey Mantle and Bill
Skowron failed to collect an RBI
among the starters as the Yanks
unloaded 16 hits against loser
Gene Conley (3-7) and three re-
lievers.
Daley (7-10), winning his third
in five decisions as a Yankee after
coming to New York from Kansas
City, gave up eight hits. He had a
three-hit shutout until Jim Pagli-
aroni opened the seventh inning
with his 11th home run. That
ended a string of 24 scoreless inn-
ings by Yankee pitchers.
The Yanks, who also ripped off
four double plays while gaining
their seventh victory in the past
eight games, broke loose for six
runs in the second inning before
Conley could get a man out.
* * *
Cubs 9, Phillies 3
CHICAGO-Don Cardwell struck

out 11 batters in a 5-hit perform-
ance as the Chicago Cubs defeated
the Philadelphia Phillies 9-3.
Winning his eighth victory
against six losses, the righthander
of no-hit fame served only two
walks. His strikeouts, high for the
Cubs this season, included Tony
Taylor, Tony Gonzalez and Pancho
Herrera in a row in the eight inn-
ing. Herrera fanned in each of his
four trips.
Ernie Banks' two-run homer in
the second inning was the Cubs'
main blow in an 11-hit salvo that
gave the tailend Phillies their
fourth straight loss and 11th in
their last 12 games. Banks' drive
against the wind into the left field
bleachers was his 13th homer of
the season.
Angels 4, Tigers 2
DETROIT-Steve Bilko's eighth
inning home run to the opposite
field propelled the Los Angeles
Angels to a 4-2 victory over Detroit
and knocked the Tigers out of first
place in the American League.
The home run by the huge first
baseman, a former Tiger, came off
ace reliever Terry Fox and broke a
2-2 tie. Earl Averill hit a ninth
inning home run off Fox for an
insurance run.
* * *
Reds 11, Dodgers 7 (1st)
LOS ANGELES-The Cincinnati
Reds, capitalizing on a dropped fly
ball, scored four unearned runs in
the fourth inning and defeated Los
Angeles 11-7 before about 65,000 in
the opener of a doubleheader. The
victory put the league-leading
Reds four full games ahead of the
second place Dodgers.

I

AND NEW CHAMPION-That's Australia's Rod Laver, who pol-
ished off Chuck McKinley of St. Louis yesterday to take the
Wimbledon Men's singles title. It was the Aussie's third crack at
the title. He was beaten in the finals in 1959 and 1960.

WIMBLEDON, England () -
Rod Laver, a red-haired Austral-
ian queenslander, outgunned and
outmaneuvered Chuck McKinley,
the 5-foot-8 bundle of energy
from St. Louis, yesterday and won
the Wimbledon men's singles
crown on his third try.
The score was 6-3, 6-1, 6-4 and
the whole match lasted exactly 55
minutes-one of the shortest fin-
als on record.
Laver was losing finalist to Alex
Olmedo in 1959;and to Neale Fra-
ser last year. This was McKin-
ley's second time out at Wimble-
don. He came here as an unseeded
but promising youngster last year
and went out in the second round.
Lucky Shot
A lucky wood shot that trickled
over the net gave Laver the win-
nine point, but his victory was
anything but lucky. Right from
the start he ran McKinley around
the court, switching his attack
from one court to the other and
drawing the American to the net
to pass him down the sidelines.
McKinley, who made a tremen-
dous reputation for himself with
his terrier-like retrieving tactics,
needs a lot of luck as he goes for
his shots. Yesterday the luck
wasn't with him. He got to many
shots anyone else would have
missed but he just couldn't pull
off the winners as he had done
against Bobby Wilson and Mike
Sangster in the two preceding
rounds.
The match, which saw an Amer-
ican pitched against an Austral-
ian in the final for the first time
since Dick Savitt of Philadelphia
beat Ken McGregor ten years
ago, started off with both men
holding their services fairly eas-
ily.
Nervous Energy
It was McKinley, exuberant and
a bundle of nervous energy, who
opened up first with his big guns
when he rocked Laver by run-
ning up a 40-0 lead in the sixth
game with the score 2-3 and Lav-
er serving.
The bandy-legged Australian
needed only ten minutes to make
the second set. Playing picture-
book tennis, he reeled off the first
three games with loss of only
three points. The American held
service in the fourth but lost the
next three games in a row.
Comes Out Fighting
The stocky American, gritting
his teeth, came out fighting in
the third set and for eight games
the set followed service. Then in
the ninth, Laver pulled off three
of the best shots of the match-a
pair of lightning forehands and a
backhand down the line-to break
McKinley for 5-4.

At
4

Two American Crews Win on Thames;
Take on Britons in Semifinals Today

4

HENLEY - ON - THAMES, Eng-
land (P)-Two American crews
won their way yesterday into the
semifinals of the tradition-steep-
ed Royal Henley Regatta on the
placid Thames.
The U.S. survivors were the
eight-oared crew of the Eliot
House of Harvard, which elimin-

HANK AARON
... clouts two

New York
Detroit
Baltimore
Cleveland
Chicago
Boston
Washington
Los Angeles
Minnesota
Kansas City

w
51
52
46
46
40
39
37
35
33
31

L
28
30
37
37
43
43
45
48
49
50

Pet.
.646
.634
.554
.554
.482
.476
.451
.422
.402
.383

GB
il
7
7
13
13/
15?
18
19y
21

SORE SHOULDERS:
Law, Crandall Put
On Disabled List

ated the Kent School of Connec-
ticut, and the four from South
Kent School of Connecticut. The
American losers were the double
scullers, Rickey Burnes and Bobby
Lea of Harvard and the Univer-
sity Barge Club of Philadelphia
in addition to the Kent 'eight.
While the American group was
reduced, the favored Russians
gained the finals of the Premier
Grand Challenge Cup for eights,
the diamond sculls, the double
sculls and the Steward's Challenge
Cup for fours.
Formidable Tasks
Both American winners face
formidable tasks today. They mov-
ed into the semifinals and will
have to win twice to capture the
prized trophies. Ten finals in all
will be held today.
Eliot House, which eliminated
Cornell's lightweights. on opening
day, scored by two lengths over
Kent on a pleasant, sunny and
almost windless day. Eliot took the
lead early and gradually widened
the gap as the schoolboys faded
in the second half. The winners

were timed in 7 minutes, 1 second
for the mile and 550 yards.
In the morning semifinal Eliot
House will meet the University of
London crew, which was two sec-
onds faster than Eliot in winning
its quarter-final. The winner will
meet the survivor of the other
semifinal between Jesus Club of
Cambridge University and the
Royal Chester Rowing Club. Je-
sus College was the fastest yes-
terday with a time of 6:58.
Close Call
South Kent, competing for the
Wyfold Cup, had to extend itself
to the utmost to beat the Not-
tingham City Rowing Club entry
by a bare two feet in 7:34.
Tomorrow the schoolboys, un-
beaten in nine races this year, will
meet the Thames Tradesmen's
Club. The Londoners are laborers
in the port of London and are
accustomed to handling heavy
freight.
Burnes and Lea were beaten by
three lengths by the British cham-
pion tanden of George Justicz and
Norman Birkmyre.

.x

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Baltimore 6-5, Kansas City 2-0
New York 14, Boston 3
Cleveland 9, Chicago 0
Washington 3, Minnesota 0
Los Angeles 4, Detroit 2
TODAY'S GAMES
Minnesota (Pascual 6-11) at Wash-
ingtont(Burnside 1-4)
Boston (Delock 5-4) at New York
(Ford 15-2)
Chicago (Pizarro 4-2) at Cleveland
(Grant 7-2)
Los Angeles (Bowsfield 5-2) at De-
troit (Mossi 9-2)
Kansas City (Shaw 5-7 or Krausse
1-3) at Baltimore (Pappas 5-3)
(n)

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct.
x-Cincinnati 52 29 .642
x-Los Angeles 48 33 .593
x-San Francisco 43 36 .544
Pittsburgh 40 35 .533
Milwaukee 37 38 .493
x-St. Louis 33 42 .440
Chicago 33 44 .429
Philadelphia 23 52 .307
x-Played night game.

GB
4
9
12
16
17
26

Vern Law and Del Crandall, two
of the National League's top stars,
have been put on the disabled
list, it was announced yesterday
by their respective clubs.
Law, whose 20 victories last sea-
son paced Pittsburgh to its first
National League pennant in 27
years, injured the rotator muscle
in his shoulder April 29 and has
pitched sparingly since. His cur-
rent record is 3-4.
Crandall, also suffering from a
bad shoulder, has long been rec-
ognized as one of the top catchers
in the major leagues. The veteran
backstop has appeared in more
than 100 games a season for Mil-
waukee every year since 1953 and
has been on seven National League
All-Star teams.
Law is expected to be out of
uniform for about six weeks. He
expects to return to his Boise,
Idaho home because "if I stick
around here I'll probably be
hanging around Forbes Field and
throwing a ball once in a while
to see how the arm feels."
However, there is a possibility
that Pirate fans will not see the
1960 Cy Young Memorial Trophy
winner again this season. His
manager, Danny Murtaugh, told
the veteran hurler that "if we're

in the pennant race when this is
all over, we'll call you. If not,
maybe we'll let you rest the re-
mainder of the season."
Crandall was injured during the
second week of the season. He is'
being sent to the famed Mayo
Clinic by the Braves for further
treatment.

COMEbl

(r 0

C~r itI ~

i

MMMMW O"

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Chicago 9, Philadelphia 3
Pittsburgh 6, Milwaukee 5
Cincinnati 11, Los Angeles 7 (1st
game, 2nd inc.)
St. Louis at San Francisco (inc.)
TODAY'S GAMES
Pittsburgh (Shantz 5-1 or Gibbon
6-4) at Milwaukee (Buhl 5-6)
Philadelphia (Roberts 1-8) at Chi-
cago (Curtis 5-2)
Cincinnati (Maloney 54) at Los An-
geles (Podres 8-2) (n)
St. Louis (Jackson 3-8) at San
Francisco (Lemay 1-1)

H1

/l

THIS SUMMER
IS YOUR CHANCE
TO JOIN
. all
EDITORIAL and
BUSINESS STAFFS
For more information

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets. Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Rev. Gene Ransom, Campus Minister
9:00 and 11:15 A.M. Morning Worship.
"Prayer Can Be Real for You." Sermon by
Dr. Rupert.
10:15 Discussion Group and Coffee in the Pine
Room
2:00 P.M. Picnic: Meet in Wesley Lounge.
WEDNESDAYS-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion, Chapel, fol-
lowed by breakfast in the Pine Room.
(Over in time for 8:00 classes).
NORTH SIDE PRESBYTERIAN
CHAPEL
2250 Fuller Road (Opposite V.A. Hospital)
NOrmandy 3-2969
9:30 A.M. Summer Worship. Child Care pro-
vided.
Minister: Dr. William S. Baker.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth-Avenue
Rev. Ernest Klaudt, Pastor
Orville H. Schroer, Parish Minister
9:30 and 10:45 A.M. Worship Service

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST STUDENT CENTER
512 and 502 E. Huron
Rev. James Middleton, Minister
Rev. Paul W. Light, Minister of Education
SUNDAY-
10:00 a.m. Morning Worship-"The Power of
Negative Thinking" Rev. Middleton preach-
ing
9:00 and 10:00 a.m. Church School Classes

hl

Sr ABl ATH

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium at Edgwood
John G. Makin
Phone NO 2-2756
10:00 A.M. Bible School
11:00 A.M. Regular Worship
6:00 P.M. Evening Worship.
WEDNESDAY-
7:30 P.M. Bible Study

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
SUNDAYS-
8:00 a.m. Holy Communion
9:00 a.m. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House.
(Morning prayer on first Sunday of
month.)
11:00 a.m. Morning prayer and sermmr
7:00 p.m. Evening prayer.
(Holy Communion on first Sunday of
month.)
TUESDAYS-
9:15 a.m. Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAYS-
7:00 a.m. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House
(over in time for 8:00 classes)
FRIDAYS-
12:10-p.m. Holy Communion followed by
lunch at the Canterbury House.
WEEKDAYS-
5:15 p.m. Daily evening prayer.

I

ST. PAUL (R)-Buster Cupit, a.
34-year-old club pro from Fort
Smith, Ark., grabbed the lead at
the halfway mark last night in
the $30,000 St. Paul Open Golf
Tournament with an 11-under
133.
nit ont a..nder 67 to go

gey on the ninth hole where he
first missed the green and then
blew a three-foot putt.
Pott missed his chance for a
tie for the lead whenche took three
from the edge on the 18th hole,
missing a four-foot putt for a
t,.«A - v,+"^ h a . - ia n

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
11:00 a.m. Sunday Services.
8:00 p.m. Wednesday Services.
9:30 a.m. Sunday School (up to 20 years of
age.)
11:00*a m Sunday School (for children 2 to
6 years of age.
A free reading room is maintained at 306 East
Liberty St. Hours are Monday through Sat-
urday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. except Sundays
and holidays. Monday evening 7:00 to 9:00

LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
and CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor.
SUNDAY-
9:30 A.M. Bible Study
10:30 A.M. Worship Service & Comrmunion
7:00 P.M. The Task of the Church-"In

CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1131 Church St.
Mr. Alvin Hoksbergen, Pastor

I lII '

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