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July 07, 1961 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1961-07-07

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, JULY 7, 1961

PAGE roun THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY. JULY 7.1961

a a«.a a~z y ,.ui " avv

Reds Edge Giants for Sixth Straight Win

By The Associated Press
Young Bill Stafford blanked
Cleveland on two hits in a near-
perfect pitching performance as
the New York Yankees beat the
Indians 4-0 last night and stayed
within a half-game of first place
Detroit In the American League
race. The Tigers defeated Boston
3-0 behind the eight-hit pitching
of Phil Regan and Terry Fox.
Baltimore missed snatching third
place from Cleveland when Wash-
ington knocked off the Orioles 1-0
on a four-hitter by Dick Donovan.
Stafford (7-4), a 22-year-old
right-hander, permitted only two
base runners. He had retired 20 in
a row before- Mike De La Hoz
smashed a single to third leading
off the ninth inning. Willie Kirk-
land's ground-rule double in the
second inning was the only other
hit by the Indians, who now have
lost four in a row and have failed
to score in 23 innings.
Elston Howard hit a pair of solo
homers for the Yankees. His ,first
led off a three-run fifth inning
against loser Dick Stigman (2-2).
In the National League, first
place Cincinnati defeated San
Francisco 3-2. It was the Reds'

±>

'NO HARD FEELINGS!':
Hemus Relaced by Keane
As Cardinal Field Manager

sixth straight success and the third
loss in a row-all by 3-2 counts-
for the third place Giants.
Night Game
The second place Los Angeles
Dodgers played a night game at
home against St. Louis. The Car-
dinals were operating under John-
ny Keane after Solly Hemus was
fired as manager early in the day.
Fourth place Pittsburgh split a
doubleheader at Chicago, romping
15-3 in the opener before the Cubs
came back for 5-1 decision in the
second game, Milwaukee, after los-
ing four in a row, swept a three-
game series from Philadelphia by
beating the last place Phils 7-6.
Wynn Victor
I the other AL games, Early
Wynn hung up his 291st victory as
the Chicago White Sox beat Kan-
sas City 4-3, and the Los Angeles
Angels moved past Minnesota into
eighth place by out-slugging the
twins 12-11 for their sixth straight
victory.
The Tigers got the big run off
loser Galen Cisco (1-3) in the first
inning on a sacrifice fly by Rocky
Colavito-the Rock's seventh RBI
in the three-game set. Fox nailed
it by getting Chuck Schilling on

three pitches for the final out with
two men on base in the ninth. Pete
Runnels had four of the eight hits
off Regan (8-4).
Miller Bombed
A triple by Frank Robinson and
Gus Bell's single, both off relief ace
Stu Miller, gave the Reds the de-
ciding run in the eighth inning.
Loser Juan Marichal (6-6) gave
up Cincinnati's first two runs, one
a homer by Gordy Coleman.
Southpaw Jim O'Toole (7-7) was
the winner, allowing seven hits,
but fanning six. The Giants, who
now trail by 72 games, were
blanked on three hits until the
seventh, when they scored on
three' singles. Ex-Red Ed Bailey
homered in the ninth.
Roberto Clemente, upping his
average 14 points to .351 in the
doubleheader with seven hits in

nine trips, drove in five runs for
the Bucs in the first game with
five hits, one, a two-run homer.
Bob Friend (9-9) was the win-
ner, although giving up 11 hits.
Loser Dick Ellsworth °(3-6) al-
lowed eight of Pittsburgh's 20 hits.
The Cubs then handed south-
paw Wilmer Mizell (4-7), a one-
time nemesis, his sixth straight
loss, scoring four runs in the sec-
ond inning on homers by Dick
Bertell and Al Heist.
Major League
Standings
NATIONAL LEAGUE

LOS ANGELES (P) - Solly
Hemus was fired yesterday as
manager of the slumping St. Louis
Cardinals and replaced by his
No. 1 aide Johnny Keane.
Hemus, 37, said he had no plans
for a new job. Keane, 50, has been
in the Cardinal system for 20
yearscashminor league manager
and coach.
The Cardinals, who finished
third last year, have been second
division fixtures this year and
were 141% names off thn

Said Keane: "The way we've Hemus was the first National
been losing makes it apparent that League manager to get the ax
w¢ h n. mnrnl l B t this season. Two American League

wnave a Morale pruuen em. UL
it's not serious, nothing that win-
ning a few games won't cure. I'm
going to bring a few older players
back into the lineup for a few
nights to take the pressure off the
youngsters."
New Coaches
The Cardinals also made vet-
eran second baseman Red Schoen-

pilots have been fired: Joe Gor-
don at Kansas City and Cookie
Lavagetto at Minneapolis.
Hemus was owner Gussie Busch's
personal choice when he was nam-
ed in 1958, succeeding Fred Hutch-
inson. The Cards finished seventh
in 1959, but after 1960's surge to
third place, hopes were high for
1961. But things started badly-

Cincinnati
x-Los Angeles
San Francisco
Pittsburgh
Milwaukee
x-St. Louis
Chicago
Philadelphia
x-Playing night

W L Pet. GB
51 29 .6384
47 32 .595 31l
43 36 .544 71/2
39 35 .527 9
37 37 .500 11
33 41 .446 15
32 44 .421 17
23 51 .311 25
game.

it
I
i

Laver 2-1 Favorite
To Whip McKinley

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Pittsburgh 15-1, Chicago 3-5
Cincinnati 3, San Francisco 2
Milwaukee 7, Philadelphia 6
St. Louis at Los Angeles (inc.)
TODAY'S GAMES
Philadelphia at Chicago
Cincinnati at Los Angeles (2)
Pittsburgh at Milwaukee (n)
St. Louis at San Francisco (n)
AMERICAN LEAGUE

EARLY WYNN
nine to go

WIMBLEDON, England M P) -
London bookies have made Charles
("Chuck") McKinley, 20-year-old
tennis star from St. Louis, a 2-1
underdog in today's Wimbledon
Tournament final against Rod
(The Rocket) Layer of Australia.
Such odds would not have been
offered two weeks ago. But the
rambunctious, fair-haired Ameri-
can has become the No. 1 person-
ality of the tournament by his
incredible energy and breakneck
speed around the court.
Third Attempt
Laver, beaten finalist for the
last two years, remains favorite
to win the title in his third at-
tempt. He lost to Neale Fraser of
Australia last year and to Alex
Olmedo of Peru in 1959.
McKinley aims at becoming the
first native-born Americanto win
the Wimbledon Men's crown since
Tony Trabert did it in 1955. If he
pulls it off, he will be the young-
est Wimbledon champion for 30
years.
McKinley, knocked out of the
men's doubles event with his part-
ner, Dennis Ralston of Bakers-
field, Calif., had no matches yes-
terday. He relaxed and watched
the two semifinals of the women's
singles.
A British First
With the partisan crowd shriek-
ing in delight, two British girls
made the final-for the first time
in living memory.
Christine Truman downed Re-
nee Schuurman of South Africa
6-4, 6-4. Angela Mortimer upset
the other South African star,
Sandra Reynolds, top-seed and
last year's defeated finalist, 10-
9, 6-3.
The 15,000 crowd on Wimble-
don's famed ivy-surrounded cen-
ter court always cheers for the
British players-and the under-
dog.
So McKinley can expect the
Piek Gillman
For Award
Mike Gillman, Daily Associate
Sports Editor last year, was re-
cently named winner of the third
annual Bernie Swanson award for
sports writing.
He will receive a cash award of
$250.
Gillman, who graduated in June
from the College of Literature,
Science, and the Arts, was given
the award on the basis of the over-
all quality of all the stories he sub-
mitted for judging rather than one
specific article.
The student from Bay City, who
was in charge of personnel while
a senior editor at The Daily, will
return to Ann Arbor in the fall as
a freshman in the Law School.
The award is given to an under-
graduate from a Big Ten school or
Notre Dame who submits "the best
example of sports writing during
the school year."
It is named after the late Bernie
Swanson, sports editor of the Min-
neapolis Star, who died in 1957.
Six Tie for
St. Paul Lead
ST. PAUL, Minn. ()-Six play-
ers stroked their way into a tie for
the first round lead in the $30,000
St. Paul Open golf tournament at
Keller Course yesterday by shoot-
ing six-under-par 66s.
Tom Nieporte, Bronxville, N.Y.,
got the first one early in the day
and then came in order Don Jan-

backing of the crowd when he
faces Laver today.
It was different in the semifinal
Wednesday. The fans groaned as
McKinley whipped Mike Sangster,
the last British hope.
"But they gave me a good hand
at the end," McKinley said. "It's
only natural that they would cheer
the British guy. But when the
match was over, and they realized
I had won, I got as good a recep-
tion as I'd have had anywhere in
the world."

Detroit
New York
Cleveland
Baltimore
Chicago
Boston
Washington
Los Angeles
Minnesota
Kansas City

W L Pct. GB
52 29 .642-
50 28 .641
45 37 .549 71.
44 37 .549 8
40 42 .488 12/
39 42 .481 13
36 45 .444 16
34 48 .415 18f2
33 48 .407 19
31 48 .392 20

Harvard,
Henley CIi
HENLEY ON THAMES, England
(MP-Rowing eights of Kent School
of Connecticut and Eliot House of
Harvard University emerged yes-
terday as American hopes in the
Thames Challenge Cup Event of
the Royal Henley Regatta.
They will meet in a quarter-
final heat of the competition to-
day, and one of them will carry
on to fight for the trophy which
Harvard University's lightweights
won the last three years but did
not defend.
Impressive Win
The schoolboys of Kent dispos-
ed of the eight of the University

2idienst a coach as well as player, with the loss of 16 of the first 19
when General Manager Bing De-
vine made the announcement at a and added Vern Benson to the games-and got no better.
news conference yesterday morn- coaching staff. Benson, manager Hemus had a one-year con-
ing, of the Card's Portland, Ore., Pa- tract at about $37,500.
'Change Called For' cific Coast League club, replaces Keane's contract, for the rest
"We feel a change is called for Darrel Johnson, who will be re- of 1961 and all of 1962, was not
og ~~assigned. dslsd
before an extended losing patternadisclosed.
becomes fixed," Devine said.
Said Hemus: "If you don't win,
you don't stay. I have no hard
feelings. It's just the way baseball
is. I have no baseball job in sight,
but I would like to return to man- H IF I
aging."
* TV RENTALS
*Gain TAPE RECORDER RENTALS
te*0CITATION KITS
Fin also SERVICE-pickup and delivery
s AIR-CONDITIONER RENTALS
p F inals ANa NL
The defeat by Eliot was a heart-
breaker for Cornell, outweighed
eight pounds per man. Cornell 1319 South University - near Washtenaw
seemed to have a chance when NO 8-7942
Eliot House got off to a ragged
start.
"That was due to tension and
nervousness," said the Rev. Jo- HENRY H.
seph Brown, Eliot coach. "But I
predict they won't be nervous to-E, mro.
It was a ding-dong race whichSVS I
saw the lead change twice before , ONG
the Harvard boys put on a tre- DISTANCE
mendous spurt in the final 100 MOVING
yards to win by one-third of a
length.

j

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Washington 1, Baltimore 0
New York 4, Cleveland 0
Detroit 3, Boston 0
Chicago 4, Kansas City 3
LosAngeles 12, Minnesota 11
TODAY'S GAMES
Kansas City at BaltimoreS(2, t-n)
Boston at New York (n)
Chicago at Cleveland (n)
Minnesota at Washington (n)
Los Angeles at Detroit (n)

ROBERTO CLEMENTE
... hot bat

AT CANDLESTICK PARK:
Ford, Koufax Probable Starters for
American, National League All-Stars

By The Associated Press
A southpaw pitching duel ap-
peared to be in prospect for next
Tuesday's fajor league All-Star
game at San Francisco,. judging
from the pitching selections made
by managers Danny Murtaugh of
the National League and Paul
Richards of the American.
It will be the first mastermind-
ing assignment for both pilots in
this 30th mid-summer baseball
spectacle. Although the National
has won nine of the last 13, the
American holds the overall edge.
16-13.
The San Francisco clash will be
the first of two All-Star games
this year, a custom which began
in 1959. The second game will be
played in Boston, July 31.
Ford To Start
It's almost a certainty that
Whitey Ford, the redoubtable left-
hander of the New York Yankees,
will pitch the first three innings
for the American Leaguers. No
official word has been given but
the Yankee manager Ralph Houk,
convinced that his fan will be
picked, has juggled Ford's pitch-

ing rotation so that he could work
three days before and four days
after the game.
Not as sure but a good possibil-
ity is that Sandy Koufax, the fire-
ball left-hander of the Los An-
geles Dodgers, will start for tie
National Leaguers. Koufax, one
of the three left-handers among
the eight pitchers named yes-
terday by Murtaugh, was slated to
pitch Friday, which would put him
in a perfect spot for the All-Star
clash.
Other hurlers named by Mur-
taugh include lefthanders Mike
McCormick of San Francisco and
the veteran Warren Spahn of Mil-
waukee.
The right-handers are Joey Jay
and Bob Purkey, Cincinnati: Art
Mahaffey, Philadelphia; Elroy
Face, Pittsburgh- and Stu Miller,
San Francisco.
Only Three Vets
Of the eight, only Spahn, Mc-
Cormick and Face have seen pre-
vious All-Star action. The Braves'
soon-to-be 300 game-winner has
worked in six All-Star games and
has a 1-0 record. McCormick and

Face are the only repeaters from
last year. Face also pitched in
both 1959 All-Star games.
The American League All-Star
pitchers, named last Monday,
number nine. The only left-
hander besides Ford is veteran
Billy Pierce of the Chicago White
Sox. The right-handers are Frank
Lary and Jim Bunning, Detroit;
Ryne Duren, Los Angeles; Dick
Donovan, Washington; Jim Perry,
Cleveland; and Mike Fornieles,
Boston.
Musial Picked
Murtaugh completed his 25-man
squad by selecting four alternate
outfielders including Stan Musial,
four extra infielders and a second
catcher. The starting eight, of
course, had been selected pre-
viously by player vote.
The reserves included, besides
Musial, outfielders Frank Robin-
son, Cincinnati; Henry Aaron, Mil-
waukee; George Altman, Chicago;
Eddie Kasko, Cincinnati; third
baseman Kenny Boyer, St. Louis
and catcher John Roseboro, Los
Angeles.

College of Dublin rather impress- No Chance Here
ively although the margin of vic- Eliot House is one of Harva
tory was only three-quarters of a intramural crews. In the U
leng h. ents t me ver the one States, it would not get a chf
mile, 550-yard course was 7 min- to race against a group like(
utes, 3 seconds. nell, an intercollegiate comr
Eliot House, eliminating the tor.
Cornell University's lightweight Four other young Americ
eight in another heat, did it in 6 representing South Kent Scho4
minutes, 52 seconds. So arithme- Connecticut, also kept U.S. c
tic seems to be on the side of the flying by winning their hea
more mature Eliot House crew, the four-oar Wyfold challenge
Figures meant something on the event.
Thames River yesterday because Rowing confidently over
conditions remained constant. placid waters, they came h
There was little wind, the river four lengths in front of Birm
was placid and the sun warmed ham University in 7 minutes
things pleasantly, seconds.
Another U.S. representativE
" the big rowing spectacle on
Beatty Wins Thames-Martin McNair of
Beach, Calif. - was elimin
when he and Edward Fariean
10 MeBirmingham, England, lost in
paired oars to a tandem from
British Quentin Boat Club.
HELSINKI k)-Jim Beatty of
San Jose, Calif., won the 1,500
meter race at yesterday's Inter-
national Track and Field Meet
with a breath-taking 200-meter
sprint finish. He left the field ofP-
European top runners behind,
clocking 3:42.4.
Finland's Olavi Salonen finish-G&FCOURSE
ed second in 3:44.4 and Istvan '
Rozsavoelgyi of Hungary third in
3:44.6.

ard's
nited
Lance
Cor-
.eti-
cans,
ol of
olors
t in
cup
the
ome
ing-
s, 43
e in
the
Long
ated
y of
the
the

' --"r\,3Flint 6, Michigan

oi
Sti

Phone Collect4-L
Flint CEdar 4-1686 M
For Lower Free Estinates
Interstate Rates Every Friday
We own, operate, schedule and dispatch our own fleet of vans
for better direct service without transfer.

k. .A2 .
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tevens
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NEXT WEEK
8 p.m. WEDNESDAY thru SATURDAY
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS
Dept. of Speech present
-S
Sam B~"ea Spwak

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Where

to

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Sunday: Dinners, 12:00 to 3:00 Closed Mondays
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