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June 30, 1961 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1961-06-30

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FRIDAY JUNE 30, 1961,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

~.MW

Dial8-6416
Playing through Saturday
TIME-
'A violently beautiful
miracle play, an
apocalyptic parable
in which good and
evil, Christian and
pagan powers
collaborate in a divine
rebirth, the continuous
nativity of love."
INGMAR
I BERGMAN'S
SUNDAY
"GENERAL
DELLA
ROVERE"

Students Win
Fulbrights
To Germany
Two University students have
won Fulbright scholarships for
study in German in the coming
school year.
They are James Kaler and Eliz-
abeth Mackey, both grads.
Author To Talk
On Civil War
Prof. Dwight L. Dumond of the
history department will lecture on
"Slavery vs. Human Rights" at
4:15 p.m. today in Aud. A.
Prof. Dumond's new book on
the topic, "Antislavery-The Cru-
sade for Freedom in America,"
will be published in October.

Lutheran Says Church
Stresses Organization

Thetchurch is facing a crisis
brought on by its neglect of in-
dividuals and its concentration on
the preservation of church organi-
zations instead, Prof. Ernest Koen-
ker said yesterday.
The Valparaiso University the-
ologian spoke before a conference
on worship and the arts spon-
sored in part by the office of re-
ligious affairs.
"A great many of our pastors
view their work primarily as ad-
ministrators of a complex set of
organizations and activities," he
said.
"We see an increased emphasis
on the sheer size of congregations.
One notes again and again that
work with individuals, particular-
ly those on the margins of life, is
long neglected or delayed.
"The motive which animates the
administrator is the preservation
of the organization. In this re-
spect," he added, "we are exper-
iencing a sort of decay, a decay
marked by wealth and numbers.
"All of us must acknowledge
our complicity in this decay. We
are frightfully sensitive to the ex-
pectations of our clientele (i.e.,
churchgoers)."
Prof. Koenker, in a second talk
at the conference, said that "the
creative artist, through his open-
ness to the formative power of
God, is empowered both to pre-
serve and feel the brokenness and
lostness of modern man, to to ex-
press his own experience of the

life-bestowing power of the Gos-
pel,"
He stressed that the artist, in
his creative work, "becomes a serv-
ant, subject to all."
Peace Corps
Trains Group
For Ghana
The Peace Corps announced a
project which will send secondary
school teachers to Ghana.
Several married couplies with-
out children are among the 70
candidates being trained for pos-
sible assignments. Eight weeks of
training will begin today at the
University of California at Berke-
ley to be followed by further
training at the University College
of Ghana.
Premier Kwame Nkrumah re-
quested Peace Corps volunteers to
serve in the local schools. They
will teach science, English and
French under the supervision of
Ghana's Ministry of Education. In
addition to teaching, the volun-
teers will participate extensively
in extra-curricular activities and
sports in Ghana's British style
boarding-school set-up.
Under Ghana's "second devel-
opment plan," its third largest
sum is allocated to education.

Stirton Asks
Work-Study
Deliberation
Students holding college work-
study jobs shouldn't be included
in conventional labor contracts,
William Stirton, University vice-
president and head of Dearborn
Center, said Tuesday.
Stirton spoke to a National con-
ference on cooperative education
held at Princeton, New Jersey,
where representatives of many lib-
eral arts schools now hostile to
work-study programs attended.
"Interest has been spurred in
work-study programs by industry
and education leaders who contend
that, in today's complex society,
students should be introduced in-
to the industrial world as an in-
tegral part of their education,"
Stirton said.
"The best work assignments for'
students occur when the budget
for student reimbursement is in
the educational units of the plant,
not in the supervisor's production
cost.
"Advanced clearance with or-
ganized labor is important, for
several reasons. One is to help in-
sure continuing the work assign-
ment in spite of economic decline.
It is also important in terms of
the 'climate' the student will find
in his assignment in industry."
The Dearborn Center offers al-
ternate periods of campus study
and jobs in industry.

By RUTH EVENHUIS
Secretary of Labor Arthur Gold-
berg has proposed a youth train-
ing and employment program de-
signed to cut unemployment in
the 16-20 age group.
A three part pilot program to
run for three years has been re-
quested by President John F. Ken-
nedy in the Administration-draft-
ed Youth Employment Opportuni-
ties Act of 1961.
On the order of a "domestic
youth corps," the program would
provide for local "public service"
work projects, a youth Conser-
vation Corps and on-the-job
training. The three aspects would
cost $75 million for the first year
and $100 million for the two suc-
ceeding years. The bill would pro-
vide employment for about 75,000.
High Jobless Rate
Goldberg said that the unem-
ployment rate in the 16-20 age
group is more than twice that of
the national average. Last October
300,000 men and 150,000 women
in that age group were unemploy-
ed.
"The concentration in our cities
of large numbers of young people,
unemployed and undereducated,
is potentially the most dangerous
sociological problem facing the
country," he said.
Prof. William Haber of the
economics department said that
"Unemployment appears to affect
three groups with, greater inci-

TO PROVIDE EMPLOYMENT:
Goldberg Drafts 'Youth Corps'

dence than for the labor force
generally: the very old, the very
young, and the less skilled. The
greatest harm in terms of national
moral is in its effect on the very
young."
Have Less Experience
"The very young have had less
experience and possess fewer skills
Blind-alley jobs-vain fruitless
search have depressing effects on
their general outlook and spirit '
"As the economy expands (and
I think it will) and as employment
conditions improve (as I expect
them to) all three groups will be
aided. But for the immediate fu-
ture young people are likely to
take a bad economic licking.
Need To Experiment
Goldberg said that an "experi-
mental" program is needed to
determine the best means of meet-
ing this problem. He said that if
this program is successful the
administration would ask for its
expansion at the end of the three
year trial.
The first segment of the pro-
gram would provide "public ser-
vice training and employment" in
schools, hospitals and publicly
owned facilities to those 16 to 22
years old.
A secon d approach is a youth
conservation corps similar to the
Civilian Conservation Corps of the
New Deal. Male volunteers 17 to 22
years old would live in camps
while receiving training and work
on conservation, forest and park
projects.
The third aspect of the program
proposed is an on-the-job train-
ing of a vocational and technical
nature particularly for those who
do not complete high school.
Run Program
The program would be run by
the Department of Labor in co-
ordination with the Department

ARTHUR J. GOLDBERG
.trains youth

of Health, Education and Welfare.
Federal grants would subsidize
the programs with the remainder
of the costs being met by the
state or local agency conducting
the program.
"The costs in a five hundred
billion dollar economy are hardly
oppressive and the gains in pro-
ductivity and morale are great,"
Prof. Haber said.
To Give Chorales
At Lecture-Recital
A lecture-recital, "The Story of
Two Lutheran Chorales," will be
presented with Marilyn Mason, or-
ganist, and Hans Davir, commen-
tator, at 8:30 tonight in Hill Aud.

GRAD MIXER
with
JOHNY HARBARD'S BAND
FRIDAY, JUNE 30
9-12 $1.00 Admission
VFW CLUB
314 EAST LIBERTY
Sponsored by the Grad Student Council

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NOW!
at the COOL,

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DIAL
2-6264

HIS BIGGEST, BROADEST, FUNNIEST EVER!
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The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Building,
before 2 p.m., two days preceding
publication.
THURSDAY, JUNE 29
General Notices
Regents' Meeting: Fri., July 28. Com-
munications for consideration at this
meeting must be in the President's
hands not later than July 18. PLEASE
SUBMIT TWENTY-ONE COPIES OF
EACH COMMUNICATION.
Staff Parking Permits: The validity
of the 1960-61 Parking permits will be
extended through July 8, 1961. 1961-62
parking permits will be required July
10, 1961, and cars not bearing the new
permit' will be subject to traffic viola-'
tion notices.
Motorized Cycle Permits: Parking per-
mits for all staff owned motor cycles,
motor scooters and motorized bicycles
will be required July 10,' 1961. Conven-
ient parking areas will be available in
existing automobile parking lots and
will be identified as such. Permits may
be obtained in the Office of Parking
Administration, 1059 Admin. Bldg. Fees
will be $10.00 per year. The parking
of these vehicles is to be restricted
to the areas designated for their use
and it will be illegal to transport, ride
or park them on campus walks' or
grass areas.
University Libraries will close at 5
p.m., Mon., July 3, and will remain
closed on INDEPENDENCE DAY, Tues.,
July 4.
Preliminary Examinations in Eng-
lish: Applicants for the Ph.D. in Eng-
lish who expect to take the prelim-
inary examinations this summer are
requested to leave their names with
Dr. Ogden, 1609 Haven Hall. The exam-
inations will be given as follows:'Eng-
lish Literature, 1550-1660, Tues., July
18, 1:30 to 4:30 p.m.; English and Amer-
ican Literature, 1660.1790, Sat., July 22,
9 a.m. to 12 noon: 1790-1870, Tues.,
July 25, 1:30 to 4:30 p.m.; and 1870-
1950, Sat., July 29, 9 a.m. to 12 noon.
The examinations will be given in 2407
Mason Hall.
Events Thursday
Educational Film Preview: Thurs.,
June 29 at 2 p.m. in the Schorling
Aud., University School. "And N Bells
Ring." Complete schedules are avail-
able in 1012 University High Schol.
Faculty Recital and Lecture: Mari-
lyn Mason, organist, and Hans David,
commentator, will present "The Story
of Two Lutneran Chorales," on Thurs.,
June 29, 8:30 p.m. in Hill Aud. Cm-
positions are by Schultz, Pachelbel,
Buxtehude, Bach, Reger, David, and
others. Open to the general public.
Linguistics Forum Lecture: Prof. Ern-
est N. McCarus, will speak on "Kurdish
Morphophonemics" on Thurs., June 29
at 7:30 p.m. in the Rackham Amphi-
theatre.
Summer Session Lecture Series:
Dwight L. Dumond, Prof. of History,.

will speak on "Slavery vs. Human
Rights" Thurs., June 29 at 4:15 p.m.
in Aud. A.
Events Friday
Educational Film Preview: Fri., June
30, 2 p.m., Scho'ling Aud., University
School. "From Precinct to President."
These films are free and open to the
public.
Placement
The Los Angeles City Schools, Los
Angeles, California, will have a repre-
sentative at the Conrad Hilton Hotel
on June 30, July 1, and 2. They are
interviewing teaching candidates for
positions available in September 1961 in
the following fields: English, Mathemat-
ics; Science. Girls' Physical Education,
Homemaking, and General Elementary
(All Grades). The interviewer will be
H. W. Baldwin and arrangements should
be made directly with him. Appoint-
ments will be from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00
p.m. only. For any additional informa-
tion contact the Bureau of Appoint-
ments, 3528 Admin. Bldg., NO 3-1511,
Ext. 489.
PERSONNEL REQUESTS:
U.S. Civil Service, VII Region-Latest
listing of current openings now post-
ed on bulletin board outside 4021 Ad-
min.
Standard Oil Company of Ohio &
Subsidiaries, Cleveland, Lima, Toledo, O,
-Several openings for graduate Chem-
ists, Engineers, Mathematicians, Econo-
mists-all fields, all degree levels. Ex-
perience required for most positions.
Library of Congress, Wash., D.C.-Bi-
weekly listing of current vacancies for
college grads, men & women, now on
file at 4021 Admin. Openings for Su-
pervisors, Librarians, Bibliographers,
Science Specialists. Knowledge of mod-
ern foreign langs. desirable for most.
Also openings for experienced Secretar-
ies--degree not required.
City of Flint, Mich.-Sanitarian-Col-
lege grad with specialization in pub-
lic health or related field. Must file
application by Fri., July 7. To inspect

sanitary practices & conditions in han-
dling & processing of foods, etc.
New York State Dept. of Labor--Open-
ing for top-level grad. as Administra-
tor of program dealing with automa-
tion, unemployment & training. Posi-
tion requires training in industrial &
general educ., edticational administra-
tion, personnel administration, survey
& research methods. Opening at Al-
bany, N.Y. on one yr. basis starting
July, 1961.
Y.W.C.A., Youngstown, O. - Asst.
Program Director-Woman grad. with
BS & some grad, work in Health,
Physical Educ., & Recreation Success-
ful exper. in YWCA or educ. would be
valuable. Red Cross Life Saving Cert. &
Water Safety Instructor's Cert. desir-
able. For Sept. 1 opening.
State of Michigan-Latest listing of
current Michigan Civil Service openings
now posted on bulletin board outside
4021 Admin.
Please contact Bureau of Appts., 4021
Admin., Ext. 3371 for further informa-
tion. I
Part-Time
Employment
The following part-time jobs are avail-
able to students Applications can be
made in the Non-Academic Personnel
Office, 1020 Admin. Bldg., Monday
through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Employers desirous of hiring stu-
dents for part-time work should con-
tact Jack Lardie; NO 3-1511, ext. 2939.
Students desiring miscellaneous odd
jobs should consult the bulletin board
in Room 1020, daily.

MALE
1-Recreation therapist, 20 hours per
week, must be experienced, perma-
nent position.
1-Experienced house painter, in ex-
change for furnished apartment,
summer only.
4-Salesmen, commission basis, must
have a car.
1-Married couple, to work in Michi-
gan camp, man to do odd jobs, and
woman to do general cleaning.
1-Medical student, full-time summer,
surgery research.
58-Psychological subjects, hours to be
arranged.
1-Room in exchange for work, sum-
mer only.
FEMALE
28-Psychological subjects, one hour to-
tal time.
1-Married couple, to work in Michi-
gan camp. man to do odd jobs, and
woman to do general cleaning.
2-Clerk-typists, part-time 15-20 hours
per week, permanent.
1-Experienced legal secretary, full-
time til September.
Organization
Notices
USE OF THIS COLUMN for announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered organizations only.
Organizations planning to be active for
the summer semester should register by
July 5, 1961. Forms available, 3011 Stu-
dent Activities Building.

Ending DIAL
Tonight 5-6290
FRED DEBBIE LILLI TAB
AAlRE-REYNOLDS-PAL AER-HUNTER
1" MERRJ t RUG6IES j
Produced by WI[CIAM PERLBERG Directed by'6EORGESEATON*Screenplay by SAMUEL TAYLOR T 'ell
Coming TROY DONAH UE in "PARRISH"
Friday:
d
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wwwwwommonq

C.h dY :'.si A": ' : Oad in r d e n UM Su nr
Og.tarfAig KATHLEEN FREEMAN and itrodgein BUDDY LESTER
HELEN TRAUBEL. HOPE HOLIDAY. LYNN ROSS&"PAT STANLEY- GEORGE RAFT

PAID ADVERTISEMENT
Cinlema r ild
presents
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday:
Sawdust and Tinsel
(The Naked Night)

TONIGHT, SEE
The MacLeish maisterwork

BILLIARDS
and
SWIMMING
daily except Sun.
at the
MICHIGAN ,UNION

UNIVERSITY
PLAYERS
powerful
retelling
of the
Job story

8 P.M. LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
while at the box office (10-8 today)
get Playbill season tickets
fun in a French penal colony
MY THREE ANGELS
by Sam and Bella Spewack
July 12-15
biting satire on Soviet society
THE BEDBUG
by Vladimir Mayakovsky
July 19-22
gripping oriental drama
R AfikAI'Th

l of
iarnarci C(am Dui CaiuaAJ
Come Help Us Celebrate !
During the past year many have come to look.. .
and remained to become daily shoppers . . .
because of our friendly neighborhood and con-
venient parking facilities . . . (just 1 block from the
Church St. parking lot) . . . and those moderate
prices which we feature on all our merchandise
hv fnmane makers.

Though Bergman filmed Saw-
dust and Tinsel (The Naked
Night) in 1953, it apparently'
was not shown in this country
until 1956, at which time one
reviewer praised some of the
acting and the other almost
completely dismissed it. Un-
doubtedly, current critics re-
sponding to Bergman's new
fame would approach it more
cautiously and sensitively. But
fame or no fame, this film
should have awakened critics
to the fact that they were in the
presence of movie genius. Some
of the scenes of Sawdust and
Tinsel are not only comparable
with the best of Bergman, but
one -_ the opening flashback-
can easily be ranked among the
greatest in film history.
Part of Bergman's appeal is
his exploration of ideas, as, for
example, his probing inquiries
into man's relation to God or
to women (Sawdust and Tinsel
belongs to the latter category).
But whatever his subject mat-
ter, Bergman seldom fails to
employ some kind of brutality
-either physical or psychologi-
cal - to illuminate character.
Physical brutality is witnessed
in the scarification of the rap-
ist, and the scenes of mass
flagellation in The Seventh Seal

tor mercilessly beats the fat
ringmaster caused many Stock-
holm moviegoers to leave the
theater. And the opening flash-
back, mentioned above, epito-
mizes Bergman's brilliant han-
dling of psychological and phys-
ical pain: the wife of the cir-
cus clown (Anders Ek) goes
swimming nude one bright,
stiffling afternoon. By having
her pick a spot where soldiers
are drilling and by having her
invite them to join her, Berg-
man is able to subject her pa-
thetic husband (who has rushed
to the scene) to the most mer-
ciless, brutal humiliation ever
witnessed on the screen. Unlike
Hitchcock, who creates a bath-
room murder for its own scin-
tillating sake, Bergman is con-
cerned with revealing the true
nature of a man reduced to his
naked humanity by this relent-
less, overwhelming humiliation.
By magnificently combining
both physical and mental pain,
Bergman creates a scene which,
in our opinion, is second in hor-
ror and pathos only to the mass
horror and tragedy of the Odes-
sa Steps episode in Potemkin...
Our short this week is com-
prised of substantial excerpts
fro mthe Tchaikowsky opera

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