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June 27, 1961 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1961-06-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

r, JUNE 27,19615

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

P AM IF T lP.V..

--JN 2,161 T E IHGA AL

r ts"jr GLA V LI A

I

IOMMENCEMENT SPEECH:
Murrow Sees End to Isolation

'U' Receives $451,549 in Gifts;
Alumni Fund Contributes Half

Chief of the United States In-
formation Agency Edward R. Mur-
row told June's graduating class
that there are no more merely
domestic issues.
"We have lost the luxury of
living in an isolated America," he
said. "To some of us the picture
of a burning bus in Alabama may
merely represent the speed and
competence of a photographer, but
to those in the United States In-
formation Agency it means that
picture will be front-paged to-
morrow all the way from Manila
to Manchester.
Impact Abroad
"The speech of a single senator
to a hometown audience can have
more impact abroad than months
of our agency's informational ac-
tivities," he said.
Discussing the agency's pro-
gram, Murrow said that attention
would be concentrated upon areas
where ideological competition is
being waged. He pointed to Afri-
ca, Latin America and Southeast
Asia as areas for expansion.
He said that the agency planned
to take the offensive in the "war
of ideas." "Distortion and dupli-
city about this nation and its
people will not go unanswered."
Murrow said that the difficulty

of interpreting America to the
world made credibility a goal.
"What is one man's truth is an-
other man's falsehood," he said.
The agency attempts to make
United States policy intelligible
and, wherever possible, palatable.
Murrow told the graduates that
"somewhere along the way you
must have picked up some ideas
about the dignity and the free-
dom of the individual, about his
right to be wrong and his rights
under the law.
"A tradition of government by
the governed, of revolution by con-
sent-these are among the greater
virtues that we have to demon-
strate to a world sorely in need of
great virtues," he said.
Sharer of Dreams
"If truth must be our guide, then
dreams must be our goal," Murrow
said. "To the hunger of those
masses yearning to learn in free-
dom, we shay say: 'We share your
dreams.' As a nation we have
never been allergic to change.
Ours was the first of the great
revolutions. It is a birthright we
do not intend to let go by de-
fault."
Murrow warned the graduates
"if your sole purpose is personal
profit at the expense of that so-

EDWARD R. MURROW
... commencement address

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ciety which made possible your
education, then history will do the
collecting."
Murrow spoke to 3,678 gradu-
ates, who brought the total num-
ber of degrees conferred by the
University since last June to 6,-
258. Advanced degrees were grant-
ed to 868 students by the gradu-
ate school at the commencement
exercises.
Regents Grant
Leaves to 18
For Next Year
(Continued from Page 10)
first semester of next year. He
will work with the Presidential
Railroad Commission wl'iich is
making a study of railroad work-
rules. Smith is also the co-direc-
tor of the Institute of Labor and
Industrial Relations.
Prof. Kenneth S. Smith of the
French department will teach
part-time in the Institute for
American Universities in Aix-en-
Provence. He was given a leave,
without salary, for the full aca-
demic year.
Chester Lang Dies;
Led Fund Drives
Chester H. Lang, chairman of
the original drive to raise funds
for the Memorial Phoenix Project
and a retired vice-president of the
General Electric Co., died June 15.
President-emeritus Alexander G.
Ruthven named Lang in March,
1949 as executive chairman of the
Phoenix drive to raise funds to
support research for peaceful uses
of atomic energy.
A 1915 University graduate,
Lang also played an important
part in the fund-raising campaign
for the Michigan Union. He re-
ceived a Distinguished Alumni
Award in 1949 and an honorary
doctor of laws degree three years
later.
During his undergraduate years,
Lang was an associate editor of
The Daily, associate editor of the
Ensian and manager of the varsity
baseball team.
Kauper To Lecture
On Religious Issue
Prof. Paul G. Kauper of the
law school will discuss "",overn-
ment and Religion: The Wall of
Separation" at 4:15 p.m.today in
Rm. 120 Hutchins Hall.
"Freedom of Association: The
First Amendment and the Bal-
ance of Interest will be discussed
by Prof. Kauper tomorrow.

The Regents accepted $451,549
in gifts, grants and bequests at
their June meeting,
Included in the total was $254,-
576.57 which was added during
the last six months to 46 already
established funds. The largest
part of the sum was $209,806.15
given to the Michigan Alumni
Fund.
The National Fund for Medi-
cal Education, Inc. gave $58,020 to
set up an annual grant for student
education.
The Regents accepted $25,000
from the estate of Maximilian
Richter for use as a perpetual
scholarship fund. Income from the
fund, to be known as the Maxi-
milian and Reba E. Richter Schol-
arship Fund, will provide support
or assistance to one or more stu-
dents in the medical school.
Medical School Fund
Another endowment fund for
use in the medical school was es-
tablished with a bequest of $23,-
449.57 from the estate of Dr.
Charles J. Socall.
Two grants were accepted from
Merck, Sharpe and Dohme, a di-
vision of Merck and Co., one of
them $7,700 for a symposium. The
second grant, for $2,500, is for the
study of hypo-tensive drugs.
The State of Michigan granted
$9,770 for the fifth Workshop in
Public Health Dentistry which
was held last week.
The Alfred P. Sloan Founda-
tion gave $7,360 to establish the
Sloan Foundation Chemistry Re-
search Fund. The Wolverine Tube
Division of Calumet and Hecla
presented $5,000 to establish a fel-
lowship in chemical and metal-
lurgical engineering.
To Execute Sculpture
The class of 1924 engineers has
given $3,782.70 through the Devel-
opment Council for a bronze
sculpture to be executed by Prof.
Thomas F. McClure, of the archi-
tecture college. It will be placed at
the Dearborn Center. Any unused
monies will be added to the class'
student loan fund.
The Regents also accepted $5,000
from the Forney W. Clement Me-
morial Foundation for the support
of the hospital school. The fund
is supported by the Kiwanis Clubs
of Michigan.
Eastman Kodak Co. gave $4,360
for a fellowship in chemical engi-
neering. The Standard Oil Co. of
California presented $3,550 for a
fellowship in chemical engineer-
ing.
The Society of Naval Architects
and Marine Engineers gave $4,000
for four undergraduate scholar-
ships.
Finance Fellowships
The Kaiser Aluminum & Chem-
ical Corp. gave a total of $3,300
with $2,745 for a fellowship and
$555 as a restricted grant to the
business administration school.
General Motors Corp. gave $3,-
000 to establish a doctoral fellow-
ship in business administration. A
fellowship in chemistry will be ini-
tiated with $3,000 given by the
Stauffer Chemical Corp.
The Regents set up a summer
fellowship in chemistry with a $3,-
000 grant from Union Carbide
Chemicals Co. Proctor & Gamble
Co. gave $2,850 for a fellowship in
chemical engineering.
The Regents also accepted $2,-
205 from Indiana University for
the Inter - University Graduate
Student Exchange Program. The
grant is for the participation of

Margaret Spencer, associate re-
search engineer in the Institute
for Science and Technology, and
Carl Proffer in the exchange of
graduate students and young fac-
ulty members between the United
States and the Soviet Union.
Set Up Fellowships
Two grants totalling $2,500 were
accepted from Douglas Aircraft
Co. with $1,750 going towards a
graduate fellowship and the re-
mainder being for an undergrad-
uate scholarship.
The Geigy Chemical Corp. gave
$2,300 for pharmaceuticals re-
search, A fellowship in pharma-
ceutical chemistry will be contin-
ued with a grant of $2,200 from
the Wm. S. Merrell Co.
The Regents also accepted $2,-
000 from the Michigan Chapter
of the National Hemophilia Foun-
dation for research by John A.
Penna, a research associate in
the Simpson Memorial Institute.
The grant will be used to evalu-

ate present treatment for the
hemophilic and to do basic re-
search on the mechanism of he-
mophilia.
Prof. John W. Gyr of the Men-
tal Health Research Institute will
run computer tests on psycholog-
ical theories of the thinking proc-
esses with a $2,000 grant from the
Social Science Research Council.
The Michigan Lions Eye Bank
of Ann Arbor gave $1,500 to' sup-
port the Michigan Eye Bank at
the medical center. E. A. Squibb
and Sons presented $1,500 for re-
search in the medical school under
the direction of Prof. Charles G.
Child III.
The Regents accepted $1,400 for
scholarships from the United
States Rubber Co. and $1,200 for
medical student research fellow-
ships from the American Cyana-
mid Co.
The Business Administration
Student Council gave $1,000 to es-
tablish a student loan fund.

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