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August 01, 1961 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1961-08-01

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DIAILY

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L <1 f. Ill 1

'1'UE:SJJAY AUGUST 1, 196

Rain Halts All-Stars, Tied 1-1, in Ninth

BOSTON (P) -- Stu Miller of the
San Francisco Giants and Camilo
Pascual of the Minnesota Twins
were locked in a 1-1 strikeout
battle when rain brought an end
to yesterday's second 1961 All-
Star game after nine innings. It
goes into the books as tie.
Miller, the National League's
winning pitcher of a 5-4 battle
in 10 innings in windy Candle-
stick Park at San Francisco on
July 11, struck out five of the 10
men he faced in a brilliant one-
hit three-inning chore. Pascual
fanned four in his three hitless in-
nings and walked only one man.
None of the 30 previous All-
Star games had ended in a tie
although the 1952 game in Phila-
delphia was rained out after five
innings with the National a 3-2
winner.
The game started in bright sun-
shine in 70 degree weather but
dark clouds rolled over Fenway
Park in the middle innings and the
lights 'were turned on at the start

I t s

of the seventh. It started to rain
in the eighth, forcing the box-
seat customers of the crowd of
31,851 to rush for cover.
Colavito Homers
For a long time it appeared that
a first-inning home run by De-
troit's Rocky Colavito off Cincin-
nati's Bob Purkey would be the
ball game. Rocky's drive, his sec-
ond in all-star play, soared about
340 feet atop the "chummy left
field wall."
Starter Jim Bunning of Detroit,
who had worked seven and a frac-
tion innings Saturday, hurled three
perfect innings and left with a 1-0
lead.
Don Schwall, Boston's amazing
rookie who has compiled an 11-2
record since his recall from Seattle
in late May, scrambled out of
dangerous situations in the fourth
and fifth before the Nationals
finally broke through for the ty-
ing run in the sixth.
Tying Run
Hank Aaron of the Milwaukee
Braves. grounded out opening the
sixth, but Schwall walked Mil-
waukee's Ed Mathews. The 23-
year -old right-hander steadied
and got Willie Mays of San Fran-
cisco on a fly ball to right but hit
San Francisco's Orlando Cepeda
on the shoulder with a pitch.
Eddie Kasko of Cincinnati
bounced a slow roller to short-
stop Luis Aparicio of Chicago who
held the ball, unable to make a
play onany runner. That loaded
the bases.
Bill White of St. Louis, who
doubled in the fifth, slammed a
sharp bouncer between Schwall's
legs. Aparaicio dashed to his left,
fielding the ball on the first base
side of second base but couldn't
make a play while Mathews raced
home with the tying run. That
ended the day's scoring.
RainI
The umpires waited for about
25 minutes while the rain poured
down. After a consultation with+
commissioner Ford Frick the game
finally was callled. It will not
be replayed, of course, and goes
into the record books, as a tie,
game, leaving the American League
with a 16-14 edge and this the
only tie in the 31-game series.
Manager Paul Richards of the
American used only three pitchers,
Bunning, Schwall and Pascual.
Danny Murtaugh, the National
League manager from Pittsburgh,
used four pitchers, following Pur-
key with Philadelphia's Art Ma-+
haffey and Los Angeles' Sandy
Koufax before he got to Miller.

Miller, who throws three pitches
- slow, slower and slowest - had
the American League sluggers
swinging vaily from their heels.
He allowed only one hit, a scrtach
infield single by Detroit's Al Ka-
line opening the ninth.
American Threat
Then came the real dramatics
as the rain soaked the field Mil-

ler's grey uniform was soggy with Francisco the wind blew so hard it
moisture as he faced his biggest actually tipped him off the hill
threat of the afternoon. for a balk. In Boston he had to

Kaline had opened the inning
with a single past Milwaukee's
Frank Bolling. Up came Mickey
Mantle, the New York Yankees'
feared home run slugger who was
hitless and had struck out in the
sixth. Mantle took the count to
2-2 and finally went down swing-
ing as boos echoed to the far
reaches of Fenway.
While Elston Howard of the
Yankees was batting, Kaline stole
second, sliding under Los Angeles'
Johnny Roseboro's perfect throw
to Bolling. But Howard also whif-
fed.

overcome the rain.
Pascual Superb
Pascual also was superb in his
three-inning workout. He retired
three in a row in the seventh,
striking out Roseboro for the sec-
ond time.
The 27-year-old Cuban curled
a curve ball past Mathews for a
third called strike in the eighth
before walking Mays on a 3-1
pitch. Then he got Orlando Ce-
peda of the Giants on a ground
out and struck out pinch hitter
Ernie Banks of the Chicago Cubs.
Again in the ninth he put down

boro for the third time. (One by
Schwall and two by Pascual).
After White doubled on a fly to
short center and took third on an
infield out in the fifth, Schwall
struck out both Roseboro and;
pinch hitter Stan Musial of St.
Louis who was breaking his own
record by appearing in his 21st
All-Star game.
[ The American League had only
one hit - Colavito's homer -
until the fifth when Brooks Rob-
inson of Baltimore led of with a
single. Kaline's singles in the
sixth off Koufax and in the ninth
off Miller wer the only other
American hits in the Nationals
four-hitter. The Americans also
had only four hits in San Fran-
cisco.

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JIM BUNNING
... All-Star starter

Douglas Sto

With the potential wining run the Nationals in order, ending with
perched on second base, Richards a flourish by striking out Rose-
called for Roy Sievers of Chicago,-
a home run hitter, to bat for
Aparicio.
Miller worked ever so carefully'Tr eX Y o
on Sievers. First a ball, then a!
called strike. Next was a strike
swinging. Two more balls put the
count to 3-2 before the slenderEe W orl
Giant slipped a third strike past
Siever's swinging bat.
Miller struck out Aparicia and WARSAW (R) - The United
Cleveland's Johnny Temple in the States long distance runners
seventh before striking out the long a source of combined amuse-
side in the ninth. ment and ridicule to the Euro-
Little Stu must wonder which peans-threatened yesterday to
side the weatherman is on. In San get down to world record clock-
ings in the near future.
"They're not laughing at us any
ps TOC Enmore," said pint-sized Max Truex,
s acting as spokesman for George
Young and Jim Beatty. "It used
to burn us up when they laughed
at us. We never were invited to
the European meets because no
- one thought we were good enough.
pion. But even he had to admit' U.S. Catching Up
this was his easiest victory. He "Everyone talks about how the
broke Froehling's service in the rest of the world is catching up to
first and seventh game of the first us in most of the track events.
set and the first and last games on Well, how about the way we are
the second set. In the deciding catching up to the Europeans in
set Douglas broke through in the the events we never bothered with
second and fourth games. --the 10,000 meters, the steeple-
After the loss, the 6-foot-4 chase and 5,000 meters?"
Froehling stood leaning against Truex shocked the 30,000 spec-
the wall in the locker room for tators who turned out for the sec-
about half an hour before he on day of the United States-Po-
could shake off his disappointment land meet Sunday by winning the
and get dressed. He could hardly 10,000 meters in 30:08.4. This is a
believe his utter defeat. European, and particularly a cen-
"I couldn't hit anything in," he tral European, specialty.
said. "He (Douglas) played well, "Furthermore," said Truex, "by
but he could have stood out there the 1964 Olympics I hope to break

ing, Reatty
Records
by Russia's Pyotr Bolotnikov).
Until last year, the American rec-
ord was 30:28 and that's why the
Europeans paid no attention tol
us.
Truex said he has been watch-
ing Bolotnikov for a long time.
"And I wonder if people realize
,that it took him seven years of
work to get his record to where
it is now."
American Record
"Setting an American record of
8:38 in Moscow gave me a lot of
encouragement," said Y o u n g.
"Now that I'm less than seven
seconds from the world record, I
don't think it's beyond me."
Young is so hepped up over try-
ing to get the record that when he
gets out of the Army, he is going
to head for the University of Ore-
gon graduate school (if he's ac-
cepted), and work under Bill
Bowerman.
"I need a good long-distance
coach," said Young. "Think of the
tremendous progress we have
made in the last two years. I was
second in the national champion-
ships in 1959 in 9:36. Phil Cole-
man's 9:21 won it."

MISCELLANEOUS
STUDENTS!
For Summertime Breaks Visit the
SCHWABEN
INN
215 Ashley
We feature the largest burger in town
also

ROCKY COLAVITO
... slugs homer
Major League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE

_#

New York
Detroit .
Baltimore
Cieveland
Chicago
Boston
Washington
Minnesota
Los Angeles
Kansas City
SUNDAY'S

_

W L Pct.
65 36 .644
64 38 .628
58 46 .558
55 49 .529
51 53 .490
47 58 .448
45 56 .446
45 56 .446
45 57 .441
37 63 .370
RESULTS

GB
8I2
11/
151/;
20
20
20
27%j

Baltimore 4-3, New York 0-1
Minnesota 4, Detroit 0
Chicago 4-8, Boston 2-9, second
game (10 Innings)
Washington 4, Kansas City 0
Los Angeles 8, Cleveland 6
SATURDAY'S RESULTS
Minnesota 5, Detroit 4
Chicago at Boston, postponed, rain
New York 5, Baltimore 4
Kansas City 2, Washington 0
Cleveland 8, Los Angeles 3

NATIONAL7
Los Angeles
Cincinnati ,
San Francisco
Milwaukee
Pittsburgh
St. Louis
Chicago
Philadelphia

LEAGUE
W L Pet.
62 38 .620
63 40 .612
54 46 .548
50 48 .510
45 48 .484
47 52 .475
43 56 .434
30 66 .313

GS
8
13 4
141,j
30

1
1
3

HAVERFORD, Pa. M)-Marine
Cpl. Jon Douglas, applied experi-
ence, a twisting service and a cal-
culated plan of attack in march-
ing over young Frank Froehling,
6-2, 6-3, 6-1 yesterday in the fin-
als of the Pennsylvania Lawn
Tennis Championship.
The 24-year-old, San Diego,
Calif , Marine, assigned here on
"temporary additional duty" car-
ried on in Leatherneck tradition
as he shattered Froehling's dream
of becoming the first unseeded
player ever to win this annual
grass court tournament.
From the first game of the
initial set fhen he broke Froehl-
ing's service with sizzlingback-
hand cross-court shot until he
ended it an hour and ten minutes
later with a backhand placement
down the lie, Douglas was in
complete control of the match.
He never trailed as his 19-year-
old opponent's bullet service de-
serted him and the youngster fellI
apart. !
Douglas, former Stanford Uni-
versity quarterback, and the na-
tion's sixth ranked player, said
before the match he planned to
attack Froehling's backhand, feel-
ing it was the most vulnerable
part of the Coral Gables, Fla.,
teenager's game. His tactic suc-
ceeded. as the unexpected collapse
of Froehhing's big serve proved the
real undoing of the loser.
Froehling, ranked 34th in the
nation and a surprise after up-
sets over top seeded Chuck Mc-
Kinley and Donald Dell, U.S. clay
court finalist, double faulted four
times in the first set, seven in
the second including set points,
and once in the final set.
On his way to the finals, Doug-
las eliminated Australia's Bob
Mark, top foreign seed, and Allan
Fox, U.S. intercollegiatecham-

l
1
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the Poor Boy Sandwich
BIKES and SCOOTERS

and won z the world record of 28:18.8 (held
PGA TOURNEY:

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GRINNELL'S
323 S. Main NO 2-5667

Barber's 67 Tops January,
Takes Golfing Championship

'

M I

SUNDAY'S RESULTS
Chicago 3-4, Cincinnati 2-5
St. Louis 5-2, Milwaukee 3-2
San Francisco 5, PhiladelphiaM2
Los Angeles 7; Pittsburgh 3
SATURDAY'S RESULTS
Los Angeles 5, Pittsburgh 4
Milwaukee- 2, St. Louis 1
Chicago 7, Cincinnati 6
San Francisco 4, Philadelphia 3

BOY'S BIKE-J. C. Higgins English-'
built. $20. Call NO 2-4736.
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
A-1 New and Used Instruments-
BA.NJOS, GUITARS abd BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington NO 2-1834
x3
Preview of Grinnell's I
PIANO FESTIVAL SALE
Come in any day

CHICAGO () -- Plucky Jerry;
Barber and his magic putter beatj
Texan Don January in a bril-
liant sub-par playoff battle yes-
terday and became the oldest and;
smallest player ever to. win the
PGA golf championship. Barber
shot a three-under-par 67 and
January a 68.
The 5-foot-5, 137-pound pro-
fessional from Los Angeles, 45
years old and the father of five,1
twice came from two shots back
and won on the final hole when
the hard-luck January twice
dumped shots into the sand and
took a bogey five.
The dramatic finish, during;
which Barber nailed birdies on
three of the last six holes, was
almost a match-but not quite-
for his unbelievable comeback
yesterday when he sang succes-
sive putts of 30, 40 and 50 feet to
gain a tie with January at 277.
On the final hole yesterday both
Barber and January, showing
signs of pressure and strain in
the intense heat, hooked their
drives into fairway traps.
The tiny Barber, a cap pulled

over his eyes, planted his feet
solidly in the sand and sent a 4-
iron shot screaming to the green,
spinning the ball 18 feet from the
cup.
January, a wasp-waisted, 31-
year-old tournament regular from
Dallas, hooked into another fair-
way trap some 30 yards closer to
the green. He blasted into another
trop, fronting the green, chipped
to within 15 feet and missed his
putt.
Barber sank his for a par 4
and the championship, worth
$11,000hin cash and bringing the
added honor of a position on the
U S. Ryder Cup team, which plays
the British pros at Royal Lytham
at St. Anne's-on-the-Sea.
The 18-hole playoff produced
some phenomenal golf for a
sweltering gallery of 4,000 over
the 6,722-yard, par 70 Olympia
Fields Country Club course, one
of the country's most famous
courses.
The Los Angeles mite, one of
nine children of an Illinois farm-
er, is one of the smallest men

STAN MUSIAL
... 21st All-Star game

HELP WAN 1ED
TWO WOMEN NEEDED for telephone
work in downtown office of local dry
cleaners. Interesting work. Guaran-
teed salary. Two shifts available. Tel.
NO 2-9546. H16
TYPIST two afternoons per week. In-
dependent real estate office. $1.75 per
hour. Sales people also needed. Com-
mission only. Prefer experienced per-
son. Call NO 3-9373. 1114
STUDENTS:, Here's an opportunity to
turn your sales ability into money.
Taking subscriptions for the Ann Ar-
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able Miss Dean will tell you all
about it. Phone NO 3-8838. H15
FOR SALE
BY OWNER, will sacrifice: 2-bedroom
ranch, oak floors, storms and screens,
garage, fenced yard. Located at 1126
Hawthorne, Ypsilanti. Key at 1040
Olivia, Ann Arbor. Terms available.
No reasonableroffer will be refused.
Reply Box 104, Michigan Daily. B12
CAR SERVICE ACCESSORIES
C-TED STANDARD SERVICE
Friendly service is our business.
Atlas tires, batteries and accessories.
Complete A'itomotive Service-All
products and services guaranteed.
Road Service
"You expect more from Standard
and you get it."
1220 South University
NO 8-9168
S1
PERSONAL
DISPOSING of my large library at pri-
vate sale. Rare opportunity for stu-
dents to build up a library of good
books at low prices. Special low prices
on sets of books. Showings at 617
Packard St. (near State) from 12
P.M. to 4 P.M. every day except Sun-
day. F8
TRANSPORTATION
Avi--:
Call NO 3-4156
Special ,weekend rates from 5 p.m.
Friday till 9 a.m Monday ..s
$12.00 plus 8c a mile. Rates
include gas, oil, insurance.
514 E. WASHINGTON ST.
eTRUCKS AVAILABLE
G1
EMPLOYMENT WANTED
WANTED-Baby-sitting jobs. Reliable
woman with own transportation. Cali
NO 3-0338.

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discount records,
ONLY BRANCH IN ANN ARBOR
of Coast-to-Coast Chain of Record Shops

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TREMENDOUS SAVINGS
SUMMER CLEARANCE SALE
ONE WEEK ONLY
CLASSICAL." POPS e FOLK " JAZZ." EVERYTHING GOES
A RCA VICTOR * ANGEL * EPIC
SLL:CAPITOL * COLUMBIA * DECCA
LONDON * MERCURY * BACHGUILD
WESTMINSTER * VANGUARD * ELEKTRA
AT DEALERS COST

I

ever to win a major champion-
ship.
Fred McLeod weighed 108
pounds when he won the U.S.
Open back in 1908 and Cyril
Walker was a beanpole of 1301
pounds when he took the same'
title in 1924. But the PGA never
has had a smaller champion and
tiny Barber is a rarity in this age
of long-knocking golf goliaths.
The oldest PGA champion had
been Chick Harbert, who was 39
years old when he won in 1954.
Barber took his victory gra-
ciously. He said he told January
as they walked off the last green:
"The best player didn't win to-
day-but I'm glad I did."
Gulping soda pop on a chain
basis and examining every putt
for at least two minutes, Barber
gave a tremendous exhibition
around the greens.
He had nine one-putt greens,
sinking birdie putts of 16, 18 and
10 feet on the 12th, 14th and 15th
greens to wipe out a 2-stroke Jan-
uary lead.
January, a lean six-footer of
165 pounds, had trouble with his
driving. He hooked his drive on
the first hole and only a lucky
carom off a fence enabled him to
salvage his par.
After assuming a 2-stroke lead
by winning the fourth and fifth
holes, he hooked his drive into
the trees at the seventh, barely
got 30 yards on his attempted re-
covery and banged his third into
a trap for a double bogey six.
He rallied to turn one-up, with
a one-under-par 34, and he went
I2-up when he put his approach
three feet from thepin for a
tbirdie deuce on the 11th.
But it was here that Barber,
refusing to be beaten, got his be-
lated charge going again-just as
he did yesterday in the final
round of the 72-hole stroke play
tournament.
Barber picked up one stroke at
the 425-yard 12th, with a 16-foot-
er, and after halving the long 13th
in pars, rolled in one from 18 feet
on the 14th hole and from 10 feet
at the 15th to go one stroke
ahead
January levelled the score at
the 16th, sinking a birdie putt of
seven feet, and when the 17th
hole was played in par 4's, the
playoff went down to the last hole

REAL ESTATE

3-BEDROOM RANCH, 11, miles from
campus. New decoration. Available
immediately. Couple or students. Call
NO 8-8855. C28

X11

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the home of Steinway, pianos
X2
FOR RENT
ON CAMPUS furnished apartments for
rent. NO 2-1443. C17
GIRL WANTED to share apt. Call Rose-
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available for summer and fall semes-
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NOW AVAILABLE - Across from East
Quad: 2 parking spaces, part of an
exciting apartment, and a small duck.
Call NO 5-7892. C9

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REALTORS
303 1. Div. 5-9114 Eves. 3-8424 or 3-0434
RU
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Buy a MARI

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J18
STUDENTS: Neat, expert typing of your
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Ann Arbor. Electric typewriter. Call
GL 3-6258. J6
VARIETY IS THE SPICE OF
RALPH'S MARKET
! Picnic supplies
Party foods
Kitchen utensils
Kosher foods
709 Packard-open till midnight!
J2
BARGAIN CORNER
SUMMER SPECIALS: Men's Wear: short
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THE MOST INTERESTING, friendliest,
store in town-come and see us! The
Treasure Mart, 529 Detroit Street, NO
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USED CARS
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