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July 29, 1961 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1961-07-29

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PAGE FOUR

TIE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, JULY "9,1961

PAGE FOUR THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY. JULY 29. 19C1

..... . . ...+ +r......}vva.rs wrv . +vva..

Yankees

Shut Out;

Tigers Lose

#6 1

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK - Skinny Brown
blanked the league-leading New
York Yankees with six hits last
night, their third shutout defeat
of the season while Baltimore rode
to a 4-0 victory on home runs by
Gus Triandos and Jackie Brandt.
Brown stretched his string of
scoreless innings to 23 including
two shutouts and two relief jobs.
Triandos actually wrapped up
the ball game in the first inning
with a three-run homer off Bud
Daley. Daley had retired the first
two batters before Jim Busby
walked and Jim Gentile singled.
Triandos then hit his first pitch
into the lower stands in left field
for his 16th home run.
Brandt hit his seventh of the
year, also into the lower leftfield
stands with noboby on in the
eighth inning.
A crowd of 39,623 roared as the
Yanks threatened to break through
Brown in the eighth inning. Suc-
cessive singles by pinch hitters
Elston Howard and Yogi Berra put
men on first and second with no-
body out. Bobby Richardson sacri-
ficed but Tony Kubek flied out to
Busby in short center and Roger
Maris grounded to Gentile.
Maris and Mickey Mantle also
had opened the seventh with suc-
cessive singles but they died on
base as Johnny Blanchard, Bill
Skowron and Hector Lopez went
out. All the Yank hits were sin-
gles.
Twins 4, Tigers 3
DETROIT-Bob Allison cracked
two home runs in the first and
ninth innings last night and car-
ried the Minnesota Twins to a 4-3
Major Leagrue
Standings
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
Cincinnati 62 38 .620 -
Los Angeles 60 38 .612 1
San Francisco 52 46 .531 9
Milwaukee 48 47 .505 112
Pittsburgh 45 46 .495 12 /
St. Louis 46 50 .479 14
Chicago 41 55 .427 19
Philadelphia 30 64 .319 29
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Los Angeles 6, Pittsburgh 4
Cincinnati 4, Chicago 3
SancFrancisco 8-3, Philadelphia 5-4
St. Louis 6, Milwaukee 2
TODAY'S GAMES
Los Angeles (Koufax 13-6) at Pitts-
burgh (Haddix 6-5)
St. Louis (Broglio 7-0) at Milwau-
kee (Buhl 7-8)
Cincinnati (Jay 14-5) at Chicago
(Curtis 6-5)
San Francisco O'Dell 4-4) at Phil-
adelphia (Ferrarese 2-6) (n)
AMERICAN LEAGUE

triumph over the Detroit Tigers
before 35,034 fans.
The Tigers, by winning, could
have moved into a virtual tie for
first place with the New York
Yankees. The Tigers fought back
after Allison's first home run and
tied the score after six innings.
But Allison, who hit his 21st
home run following a walk to Len-
nie Green in the first inning,
socked his 22nd after an error by
shortstop Dick McAuliffe in the
ninth.
The Twins got only two other
hits, Jim Lemon's first inning
single and Bill Tuttle's fifth inning
single.
Billy Bruton drove in Detroit's
first two runs with a single in the
The summer Intramural golf
tournament will be held next
Tuesday, August 1, at 3:45 on
the University Golf Course.
The tourney will consistof
18 - hole meda I play, using
summer rules. All starting times
will be reserved.
Prospective entrants are ad-
vised to call the I-M building
at NO 3-4181 for verification
of starting times.
third inning and his 11th home
run in the sixth inning.
Pedro Ramos won his eighth
game but needed Ray Moore to
get the final out. Ramos gave up
a pinch home run to Charlie Max-
well after retiring the first two
batters in the ninth inning. Moore
was summoned after Ramos
walked Larry Osborne.
S* * *
CHICAGO - Outfielder Frank
Robinson walloped a pair of home
runs yesterday in leading the first
place Cincinnati Reds to a 4-3
victory over the Chicago Cubs be-
hind a clutch job of relief pitching
by southpaw Bill Henry.
Robinson, making a strong bid
for the National League's triple
crown, accounted for three of Cin-
cinatti's runs while the fourth
scored on a homer by Wally Post.
Southpaw Jim O'Toole, reached
for a pair of homers by Ernie
Banks, gained his 10th victory in
18 decision but needed help in the
ninth when the Cubs came within
one run and had the tying run on
third with one out.
With one out in the ninth,
O'Toole hit Billy Williams with a
pitch and pinch hitter Ron Santo
fallowed with a triple. Jim Bros-

nan took over for O'Toole and
walked pinch batter Bob Will.
Henry then came in and struck
out Ed Bouchee and got pinch bat-
ter Sammy Taylor to foul out to
end the game.
Robinson clubbed his 31st homer
with a man on in the third off
starter Dick Ellsworth and Post
followed with his 12th homer for
a 3-0 Cincinnati lead.
,, , ,
Red Sox 8, White Sox 3
BOSTON- Boston rookie Don
Schwall checked Chicago on eight
hits, four of them scratch blows,
for an 8-3 victory last night. The
nervy righthander, who made his
major league debut May 21 by
beating the White Sox, handcuffed
them in all but two innings to-
night as he registered his 11th
triumph against two defeats.
Named to the American League
squad for Monday's second all star
game here, Schwall pitched his
usual cool game, spiced with his
low, breaking stuff.
Chicago bunched its hits in the
fifth and sixth frames, cutting the
Red Sox lead to 4-3 at one point.
But the home forces didn't let up
on their 13-hit attack on five
White Sox pitchers as they snap-
ped a four-game losing streak and
extended Chicago's to five.
Pete Runnels, honored in pre-
game ceremonies as 1960 batting
champion, banged out three hits
for Boston as did Gary Geiger and
Chuck Schilling. Geoger, Frank
Malzone and Carl Yastrzemski
drove in two runs apiece for the
winners.
Dodgers 6, Pirates 4
PITTSBURGH - Southpaw
Johnny Podres, with ninth-inning
help from Dick Farrell, pitched
a 6-4 victory over Pittsburgh last
night as surging Los Angeles won
its sixth straight.
Podres, notching his 13th vic-
tory and fifth consecutive against
two defeats, gave up only one hit
in the first six innings and six
overall.
No Pirate got as far as second
base until Dick Stuart blasted his
15th omer of the year in the
seventh inning after Roberto Cle-
mente singled.
Farrell came on with two out
in the final inning after Bill Vir-
don singled and Stuart doubled
him home.
Duke Snider and Willie Davis
smacked consecutive home runs
off reliever Roy Face in the ninth.
Snider's homer, his sixth, came
after Norm Larker singled.
** *
Giants 8, Phillies 5
PHILADELPHIA - The San
Francisco Giants scored five times
in the seventh inning on doubles
by Joe Amaltano and Willie
Mays, two singles, two errors and
a wild pitch to defeat the Phila-
delphia Phillies 8-5 in the first
game of a twinight doubleheader.
Three of the runs came off
starter Art Mahaffey who lost
his 14th game in 21 decisions.
The Giants' other three runs
came in the second. Orlando Ce-
peda singled and Jim Davenport
doubled him home. Jose Pagan
doubled and starting pitcher Bob
Bolin singled, scoring Davenport
and Pagan.
Wes Covington accounted for
three of the Phillies' runs with two
successive homers. In the first
inning Bob Malkmus and John
Callison walked and came home
on Covington's four-bagger over
the right field wall. Wes had a
solo home run to lead off the third.

Cards 6, Braves 2
MILWAUKEE - Righthander
Larry Jackson, rebounding from
an early season injury, posted his
sixth victory with a six-hitter as
the St. Louis Cardinals defeated
the Milwaukee Braves 6-2 last
night with the help of light hitting
shortstop Bob Lillis.
Jackson, who suffered a frac-
tured jaw when hit by a line drive
just before the opening of the
official National League season,
posted his third straight triumph
in dazzling the fourth - place
Braves, who dropped 112 games
behind the front running Cincin-
nati club.

Lillis, who has been hitting at a
.230 clip since being obtained from
the Los Angeles Dodgers a few
weeks ago, drove in three runs
with a single in the third, and a
perfect bunt in the seventh.
Jackson, who has lost eight,
struck out seven and walked only
two in setting down the Braves.
Milwaukee scored its first run
when Hank Aaron led off the sec-
ond with his 26th homer, a blast
into the centerfield bleachers, and
added another in the fourth on a
walk, a single to right and an in-
field grounder.
* * *
Senators 10, Athletics 6
KANSAS CITY-The Washing-
ton Senators outscored the Kansas
City Athletics 10-6 last night in a
24-hit slugfest.
Marty Keough and Bud Ziptel
led the attack on six Kansas City
pitchers, Keough with a triplce and
a run-scoring single, and Ziptel
with a pair of doubles.
Marty Kutyna (6-2), a former
Athletic, was the winning pitcher
and Joe Nuxhall (4-8) the loser.
The Senators and the A's ex-
changed runs in the second inn-
ing, the Senators getting theirs
on two singles and a walk, and the
A's theirs on a single and Bobby
Del Greco's double.
The A's picked up two more runs
in the fourth. Jerry Lumpe singled,
Joe Pignatano doubled him home,
and Del Greco scored Pignantano
with a single.
The Senators got to starter Ed
Rakow good in the sixth, nicking
him for a triple, a double and a
single before he retired in favor
of Gerry Staley with two runs in,
one out and one on. Staley issued
two singles and a walk before re-
tiring the side but he was respon-
sible for only one of the four runs
which scored, giving the senators
a 5-4 lead.

IS
BIKES and SCOOTERS
BOY'S BIKE-J. C. Higgins English-
built. $20. Call NO 2-4736.
EMPLOYMENT WANTED
WANTED-Baby-sitting jobs. Reliable
woman with own transportation. Call
NO 3-0338.
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
A-i New and Used Instruments
BA.NJOS, GUITARS and BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington NO 2-1834
X3
Preview of Grinnell's
PIANO FESTIVAL SALE
Come in any day
and see these tremendous
values from $399 up.
GRI NNELL'S
323 S. Main NO 2-5667
the home of Steinway pianos
X2
FOR RENT
3-BEDROOM RANCH, 1% miles from
campus. New decoration. Available
immediately. Couple or students. Call
NO 8-8855. C28
ROOM for 1 or 2 quiet gentlemen. Cook-
ing privileges optional. NO:8-8345. C27
2 GIRLS wanted in fall to share roomy,
mod, apt. near campus. Call Elaine
Pratt, NO 3-1561, ext. 168. C26
ON CAMPUS furnished apartments for
rent. NO 2-1443. C17
CAMPUS-HOSPITAL-Lovely furnished
apartment suitable for four girls.
Parking. Call 2-0671. C66
ON CAMPUS garage and lot parking
available for summer and fail semes-
ters. NO 2-1443. C16
NOW AVAILABLE - Across from East
Quad: 2 parking spaces, part of an
exciting apartment, and a small duck.
Call NO 5-7892. 9
Ann Arbor's
FINEST
Apartments
at
Moderate
Rentals
Schedule of Rentals:
Studio ..................$ 98 to 126
1-Bedroom1............20 to 180
2-Bedroom ............. 225 to 270
3-Bedroom............ 270 to 330
(Including heat, water, Frigi-
daire range and refrigerator,
swimming pool)
Models open 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily
and. Sunday. Immediate occupancy.
2200 Fuller Road.
HURON
TOWERS

HRSIEIEDS

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

LINES
2
3
4

ONE-DAY
70
.85
1. 00

SPECIAL
SIX-DAY
RATE
.58
.70
.83
to a line

I

Figure 5 average words

Call Classified bet

tween 1 :00 and 3:00 Mon. thru Fri.
Phone NO 2-4786

4

REAL ESTATE
INCOME PROPERTY for sale. $1500
down. Student apartments for rent.
Call 5-9114.
RBOR
SSSOCI AT ES,

HELP WAN' ED

REALTORS
303 8. Div. 5-9114 Eves. 3-8424

or 3-0434
Ri

BUSINESS SERVICES

What's Sunday brunch
without bagels?
RALPH'S MARKET has 'em
709 Packard

Ralph's isopen till midnight
every night.

J

FRANKIE ROBINSON
. . two homers

PGA CLOUDBURST:
Wall's Par Washed Out;
Double Round Sunday

New York
Detroit
Baltimore
x-Cleveland
Chicago
Boston
Washington
Minnesota
x-Los Angeles
Kansas City
x-Playing night

W L
64 34
64 36
56 45
54 47
50 52
46 57
44 55
43 56
43 56
36 62
game.

Pct. GS
.653 -
.640 1
.554 9%
.535 11%
.40 16
.446 20%
.444 204
.434 21%
.434 21%
.365 28

CHICAGO WA) - A second
straight fine round by injury-
prone Art Wall, Jr.-an even par
70-was washed out yesterday by
a heavy cloudburst during the
second round of the PGA Golf
Championship.
The mild-mannered profession-,
al from Pocono Manor, Pa., had
just added the score to his lead-
ing opening round of 67 for a
halfway 137 when the skies open-
ed up and Olympia's fairways
were turned into rivulets and the
greens into miniature lakes.
With 54 of the 166 scores com-
pleted, play was suspended at
1:20 p.m. and then at 2:45 p.m.
Officials announced postpone-
ment of the second round until
today.
All the shots hit on this black,
miserable day were tossed out as
if they never happened. The field
will resume tomorrow with Wall
at 67 holding a one-stroke lead
over defending champion Jay He-
bert and Ernie Vossler of Okla-
homa City, tied at 68. Knotted at
69 are little Jerry Barber of Los
Angeles, Doug Ford of Yonkers,
N.Y., and Bill Heinlein, a 50-year-
old club pro from Carmel, Ind.
The field will be cut to the low
60 and ties after today's round
and two rounds will be played

Sunday, giving the tournament
for this one occasion the 36-hole
final day format of the U.S. and
British Open championships.
The two red hot favorites-Ar-
nold Palmer' and Gary Player-
were in the locker room, in rain
gear waiting for a late teeoff,
when the cancellation came.
Palmer, recent winner of the
British Open( had a 73 yesterday
and Player, the Masters Cham-
pion from South Africa, had a 72
The postponement was a keen
disappointment to Wall, who felt
he was lucky to get such a good
round. It was doubly distressing
to 25-year-old Johnny Pott of
Shreveport. La., and Ford, who
had beaten the elements with
solid rounds.

DATA PROCESSING of all kinds per-
formed. Programming, statistical an-
alysis, and consulting. Call NO 5-6713.
J18
STUDENTS: Neat, expert typing of your
papers, etc., pickup and delivery in
Ann Arbor. Electric typewriter. Call
GL 3-6258. J6
PERSONAL
Subscribe now
to the MICHIGAN DAILY.
$1.00 for the rest of the summer.
News, campus events, entertainment
and the classifieds will make the
summer months more interesting,
more fun. Fil
BARGAIN CORNER
TENNIS RACKETS, bicycles, patio fur-
niture, draperies. The Treasure Mart,
529 Detroit Street, NO 2-1363. Open
Monday and Friday nights till 9:00.
Wl
SUMMER SPECIALS: Men's Wear: short
sleeve sport shirts 99c & $1.50; knit
sport shirts $1.44; wash-n-wear slacks
2.77: many other big buys-Sam's
Store, 122 E. Washington. W2
USED CARS
'53 HILLMAN Minx convertible. Needs
some work. Very reasonable. Call NO
3-3501 after 6 p.m. N4

STUDENTS: Here's an opportunity to
turn your sales ability into money.
Taking subscriptions for the Ann Ar-
bor Digest is profitable--very profit-
able. Miss Dean will tell you all
about it. Phone NO 3-8838. HIS
PART-TIME stenographer for summer
work. Box 510, Ann Arbor. H16
TYPIST two afternoons per week. In-
dependent real estate offce. $1.75 per
hour. Sales people also needed. Coi-
mission only. Prefer experienced per-
son. Call NO 3-9373. H14
FOR SALE
BY OWNER, will sacrifice: 2-bedroom
ranch, oak floors, storms and screens.
garage, fenced yard. Located at 1126
Hawthorne, Ypsilanti. Key at 1040
Olivia, Ann Arbor. Terms available.
No reasonable offer will be refused.
Reply Box 104, Michigan Daily. B12
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
FOREIGN CAR SERVICE
We service all makes and models
of Foreign and Sports Cars.
Lubrication $1.50
Nye Motor Sales
514 E. Washington
Phone NO 3-4858
87
C-TED STANDARD SERVICE
Friendly service is our business.
Atlas tires, batteries and accessories.
Complete A'.ttomotive Service-All
products and services guaranteed.
Road Service
"You expect more from Standard
and you get it."
1220 South University
SNO 8-9168
4 1

NO 3-0800
NO 5-9161

CIO

.---r--

'i

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Baltimore 4, New York 0
Minnesota 4, Detroit 3
Cleveland at Los Angeles (inc.)
Boston 8, Chicago 3
Washington 10, Kansas City 6
TODAY'S GAMES
Chicago (Baumann 7-8) at Boston
(Delock 5-6)
Baltimore (Wilhelm 7-5) at New
York (Ford 18-2)
Minnesota (Kaat 3-11) at Detroit
(Bunning 11-7)
Washington (Hobaugh 6-5) at Kan-
sas City (Rakow 2-4)
Cleveland (Perry 7-8) at Los An-
geles (McBride 9-5) (n)

r"C OME

EQ*C

~.rIRCiI
SM) BrAlIr-I

SKINNY BROWN
... shut out Yanks

ANTITRUST ACTION:
Grim Rejects NFL-CBS TV Contract

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets. Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Hcever Rupert, Minister
Rev. Gene Ransom, Campus Minister
9:00 and 11:15 a.m. Morning Worship,
"Taylor Made for 'Days Like That," Ser-
mon by Dr. Rupert.
10:15 Discussion Group and Coffee in the Pine
Room.
2:00 p.m. Picnic: Meet in Wesley Lounge.
WEDNESDAY-
7:00 a.m. Holy Communion, Chapel, followed
by breakfast in the Pine Room. (Over in
time for 8:00 classes.)

CrIE1

PHILADELPHIA (A') - A fed-
eral judge today denied the Na-
tional Football League's petition
asking for a delay in carrying
out his previous ruling the NFL's
television contract with the Co-
lumbiasBroadcasting System is in
violation of the antitrust law.
Thus, U. S. District Court
Judge Allan K. Grim threw a
blackout over this fall's $9.3 mil-
lion TV program of NFL games.
The league had a two-year con-
tract with CBS.
Unless Grim's denial is upset by
appeal to higher courts, the NFL
clubs will have to negotiate in-
dividually for TV contracts.
His ruling could affect other
sportsTV contracts, such as those
of the National Basketball As-
sociation and American Football
League.
Last year, CBS had nine teams
under individual contracts, the
National Broadcasting Co. had two
and two operated under indepen-
dent networks. The league's 14th
club, starts operations this year.
Second Rejection
The judge also rejected a sec-
ond NFL petition asking him to
wait until Dec. 31 to have a full
hearing on whether his earlier
injunction should be modified.
Grim's decision followed by an

Broadcasting System and of the
agreement among the defendants
for the sale of pooled television
rights underlying said contract,
and the defendants are thusly ...
restrained and enjoined from en-
tering into . . . said contract."
Testimony Backed Up
Testimony by NFL officials was
backed up in court by William
Macphail, Columbia Broadcasting
System vice-president in charge
of sports, who said his network
would be forced to drop all but
three teams in 1962 unless the
package contract was ruled legal.
Joe Donoghue, executive vice-
president of the champion Phila-
delphia Eagles, said that unless
CBS renewed its option with his
club in 1962, "We're dead, out of
business. In fact without packaged
TV all sports as we know them
will be out of business within two
years."
Tex Schramm, general manager
of the Dallas Cowboys, said his
team can't exist unless the league
is allowed to operate under a
package TV contract. A former
television executive with CBS be-
fore going to Dallas, Schramm told
Judge Allan J. Grimm in U. S.
district court that other lower
ranked teams would have to give
up without television.
Pr..S44n .n V

inated competition among the
teams and controlled the price in
violation of the antitrust laws.
Rozelle, who testified yesterday,
said that unless the package is
approved, half of his teams would
be without TV in 1962, "an eco-
nomic disaster for the league." He
described the contract as neces-
sary for survival and to compete
with the American Football League

which operates under a package
deal.
Macphail told Judge Grim that
under the package, CBS for the
first time since it began televising
football in 1956, was able to "sell
out New York City." He explained
that by sellout he meant all 16
commercials were sold nationally
to sponsors - four in each quarter
of a game.

U.S. Coach Sees Poles
As Toughest Competition

WARSAW (3) - The touring
United States track team, winner,
of all.three of itsprevious meets,
takes on Poland in the final and
toughest assignment of the long
journey today and Sunday.
"We should win it," said Coach
Jim Elliott, "but I believe the
score will be the closest of all
four meets."
Elliott's team defeated Russia
13-9, and West Germany and
Great Britain 14-6 each before
coming to Poland.
The Tenth Anniversary Stadium
has been sold out for days, and
nofiia al eictthat 100.0001

ed States team virtually has re-
covered from its unbelievable se-
ries of injuries and ailments that
struck in the past two weeks.
The only doubtful starter is
American mile record holder Dy-
rol Burleson in the 1,500 meters.
Elliott permitted him to skip yes-
terday's workout in hopes that
his aching leg would respond to
rest.
If he starts, Burleson will com-
pete against Witold Baran, who
earlier this spring posted a 3:41.2
for 1,500 meters. It is the fastest
in the world this year.

NORTH SIDE PRESBYTERIAN
CHAPEL
2250 Fuller Road (Opposite V.A. Hospital)
NOrmandy 3-2969
9:30 A.M. Summer Worship. Child Care pro-
vided.
Minister: Dr. William S. Baker.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
1 1 :00 a.m. Sunday Services.
8:00 p.m. Wednesday Services.
9:30 a.m. Sunday School (up to 20 years of
age.)
11:00 a.m. Sunday School (for children 2 to
6 years of age.)
A free reading room is maintained at 306 East
Liberty St. Hours are Monday through Sat-
urday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. except Sundays
and holidays. Monday evening 7:00 to 9:00

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST STUDENT CENTER
512 and 502 E. Huron
Rev. James Middleton, Minister
Rev. Paul W. Light, Minister of Education
SUNDAY-
10:00 A.M. Morning Worship-'Keep off
Median," Mr. Light preaching.
9:00 and 10:00 A.M. Church School
Classes.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium at Edgwood
John G. Makin
Phone NO 2-2756
10:00 A.M. Bible School
11:00 A.M. Regular Worship
6:00 P.M. Evening Worship.
WEDNESDAY-
7:30 P.M. Bible Study
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Avenue
Rev. Ernest Klaudt, Pastor
Orville H. Schroer, Parish Minister.
9:30 and 10:45 A.M. Worship Service
CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1131 Church St.
Mr. Alvin Hoksbergen, Pastor
Morning Services, 10:30 A.M.
Sunday School, 9:30 A.M.
Evening Worship Service, 7:00 P.M.

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
SUNDAYS-
8:00 a.m. Holy Communion
9:00 a.m. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House.
(Morning prayer on first Sunday of
month.)
11:00 a.m. Morning prayer and sermon
(Holy Communion on first Sunday of
month.)
7:00 p.m. Evening prayer.
TUESDAYS-
9:15 a.m. Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAYS-
7:00 a.m. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House
(over in time for 8:00 classes)
FRIDAYS-
12:10 p.m. Holy Communion followed by
lunch at the Canterbury House.
WEEKDAYS-
5:15 p.m. Daily evening prayer.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
and CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
H ill St. at S. Forest Ave.
HenryO. Yoder, Pastor.
SUNDAY-
9:30 a.m. Bible Study.
10:30 a.m. Worship Service.
7:00 p.m. The Task of the Church: "in
Secondary Education - Church or
Public Operated Schools"-Miss Ger-
trude Fiegel. Hiah School Teacher.

.4

i _ _ __

11

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