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July 14, 1964 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1964-07-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
LCULTY SHOULD GUARD THEM

Proposed AA UP Statement Declares

Rights'

of Students

4'

i

EDITOR'S NOTE: The following
. a draft entitled "Statement on
'acuty Responsibility for the Aca-
ein a Freedomofr Students." It
ras written by a national subcom-
mittee of the American Association
f University Professors. Their
raft wnibetprinted in the AAUP
llletin In the fall and then go
efore the AAUP plenary body meet-
ng next spring for formal adop-
The statement can only serve in
xt advisory role; it has no official
authority to change rules. Its f-
etiveness will rely onĀ° the dis-
ribution and discussion which the
LAUP can create.
Freedom to teach and freedom
learn are indivisible. Freedom
learn depends upon appropriate
aditions and opportunities in
e classroom, as well as op-
rtunities to exercise the rights
citizenship on and off the
mpus. The achievement and
atinuance of these conditions of
edom require not only a defi-
ion of rights but the establish-
mnt of procedures for their pro-
etion.
Faculty responsibility for the
ademic freedom of students
,ns from the recognition that
edom of inquiry and expres-
n are essential attributes of a
mmunity of scholars. As mem-
rs and immediate guardiais of
at community, faculty members
are with administrators a spe..
,i responsibility for establish-
i and maintaining conditions
der which freedom of inquiry
y flourish. Thsi responsibility
to be exercised both through
eir individual capacity as teach-
= and their corporate authority
the governance of the instruc-
ns in which they serve. The
lowing statement outlines the
>pe of this responsibility and
Igests standards and procedures
tereby thsi obligation may be
Wcharged by members of the pro-
sion.
Responsibility of the
Professor as Teacher
The professor in the classroom
d in conference has the obli-
tion to maintain an atmosphere
free discussion, inquiry, and
iression, and should take no
on to penalize students be-
use of their opinions or 'be-
use of their conduct in mat-
s unrelated to academic stand-
Is. He also has the obligation
eoaluate their performance just-
PROTECTION OF FREEDOM
'EXPRESSION.'Students should
free to take reasoned exception
the data or views offered in
rticular courses of study. This
iy be required to know thor-
Ihly the particulars set out by
e instructor, but they should be
e to reserve personal judgment
to the truth or falsity of what
presented. Knowledge and aca-
mic performance, not belief,
ould be the yardstick by which
tdents are measured.
PROTECTION AGAINST UN-
ST GRADING OR EVALUA-
ON. Students must maintain
.ndards of academic perform-
ce set by their institution if
y are to receive the certificate
competence implied by course
dits and degrees. The student
Auld have protection against un-
t grading and evaluation due
incompetence, error, or preju-
e; The faculty should establish
orderly procedure whereby stu-
ot allegations of prejudice or
or in the awarding of grades or
e evaluation of progress toward
degree may be reviewed by a
npetent academic authority.
PROTECTION AGAINST IM-
OPER OR HARMFUL DIS-
OSURE. Institutions should
ve a carefully considered policy
to what information should be
t of the permanent student rec-
l and as to the conditions of
disclosure. The information

about students which teachers ac-
quire in the course of their work
as instructors, advisers, and coun-
selors is of a privileged character
and its protection against im-
proper or harmful disclosure is a
serious professional obligation. In
particular, the protection of the
climate of freedom on the cam-
pus requires that any information
as to the personal views, convic-
tions,, or political associations of
students which teachers and oth-
er university personnel acquire
should be confidential and should
not be disclosed. Disciplinary ac-
tions which do not result in sus-
pension for a term or dismissal
should not be posted to perma-
nent academic records which are
made available to outside parties.
II
Responsibility of the
Professor as Participant
in Institutional
Government
The professor shares in insti-
tutional government and in this
capacity has further responsibili-
ties for achieving and preserving
an environment of freedom for
students.
FREEDOM OF STUDENT AD-
MISSION ON NON-DISCRIMI-
NATORY BASIS. The faculty
should insure that college and
university admissions policies do
not discriminate on the basis of
race, creed, or national origin.
Institutions of an avowed sec-
tarian character may choose' to
limit enrollment to those of their
own religious conviction but such
limitations should be clearly and
publicly stated. University facili-
ties -and services should be open
to ally students without reference
to race, creed, or national origin,
and the university should use its
influence in they community to
insure that off-campus housing,
eating, and recreational facilities
are open to all of its students
without discrimination.
FREEDOM OF STUDENT OR-
GANIZATION AND ASSOCIA-
TION. The faculty should protect
the freedom of students to or-
ganize to promote their common
interests. Institutional regulations
and policies should assure such
freedom. Intervention in the ac-
tivities of student organizations
should be exceptional.
1) Student organizations should
not be required to submit lists of
members other than current lists
of officers, except that purely so-
cial organizations required to
maintain minimum grade averages
among their members may submit
current lists for checking grade
averages.
2) Campus organizations, facili-
ties, and activities should be open
to all students without respect
to race, creed, or national origin,
except for the possible limita-
tion of sectarian organizations.
Organizations and activities should
be open in fact and not merely
formally open because of the ab-
sence of restrictive clauses.
3) Students and student orga-
nizations should be free to dis-
cuss all questions of interest to
them and to express opinions
publicly or privately without pen-
alty, to promote the causes they
support by distributing literature,
circulating petitions, picketing, or
taking any other peaceful action
on or off the campus.
4) Any person who is presented
by a recognized student organiza-
tion should be allowed to speak on
aa college or university campus.
Institutional control of the use
of campus facilities by student or-
ganizations for meetings and oth-
er organizational purposes should
not be employed as a device to
censor or prohibit controversial
speakers or the discussion of con-
troversial topics. The only con-

trols which may be imposed are
those required by orderly sched-
uling of the use of space.
5) Institutional regulations and
the announcements of student
groups should make it clear that
neither student organizations nor
the speakers they bring to the
campus necessarily represent the
view of the entire student body,
the faculty, or the administration.
FREEDOM TO ESTABLISH
AND OPERATE STUDENT GOV-
ERNMENT. Student self-govern-
ment provides a valuable means
for the exercise of the rights
and obligations of students as
campus citizens. It is therefore a
responsibility of the faculty to
encourage a fully representative
student self government, and to
protect the student government
from arbitrary intervention in its
affairs by the removal or suspen-
sion of officers, by the withhold-
ing of funds, or by unilateral
changes in a charter which de-
fines its organization and com-
petence. The electorate of such a
government should consist of the
entire student body and should
not be defined in terms of mem-
bership in clubs or organizations.
As a constituent of the academic
community, the student govern-
ment should have clearly de-
fined means to participate in the
formulation and application of
regulations affecting student con-
duct. It should also be free to ex-
press its views on issues of insti-
tutional policy and on matters of
ger: al interest to the student
body.
Students should be free to or-
ganize and join associations for
educational, political, religious or
cultural purposes. The fact of af-
filiation with any extra-mural as-
sociation or national organization
or political party, so long as it is
an open affiliation, should not of
itself bar a group from recogni-
tion. The administration should
not discriminate against a student
because of membership in any
such organization.
A student organization should be
free to choose its own faculty ad-
viser. No organization should be
forbidden when, after reasonable
effort, it has failed to obtain a
faculty adviser. An adviser should
consult with and advise the or-
ganization but should have no au-
thority or responsibility to regu-
late or control its activities.
FREEDOM OF STUDENT PUB-
LICATION. An academic commu-
nity requires freedom to exchange
information and ideas. The fac-
ulty should promote and sustain
institutional policies which will
provide students the freedom to
establish their own publications
and to conduct them free of cen-
sorship or of faculty or admin-
istrative determination of con-
tent or editorial policy.
1) Editors and managers of stu-
dent publications should be select-
ed democratically, on the basis of
competence, and in accordance
with established procedures.
2) Editors and managers should
have independence of action dur-
ing their term of office. They
should be protected against sus-
pension and removal because of
faculty, administrative, or public
disapproval of editorial policy or
content. Similarly, neither stu-
dent control of the publication nor
the powers of the student govern-
ing body should be used to limit
editorial freedom. On the other
hand, a student publication should
open its pages to representation of
diverse points of view.
3) Freedom to distribute pub-
lications on or off campus should
be permitted.
4) Students should also be free
to establish, publish, and distribute
unsubsidized publications without
institutional niterference.
5) Student directors of campus
television and radio stations, not

operated primarily for instruc-
tional purposes, should have a
freedom of programming, subject
to F.C.C. regulations, comparable
to that of the editorial staff of
campus publications.
Responsibility of Faculty
for Safeguarding Off-
Campus Freedom of
Students
The faculty has an obligation
to insure that institutional au-
thority and disciplinaryy powers
are not employed to circumvent
or limit the rights of students as
members of the larger community.
CITIZEN FREEDOMS. Students
should enjoy the same freedom of
religion, speech, press and assem-
bly, and the right to petition the
authorities, that citizens general-
ly possess. Exercise of these rights
subject them to institutional pen-
on or off the campus should not
alties.
POLITICAL RIGHTS. Off-cam-
pus activities of students may
upon occasion result in violation
of law. Students who violate or-
dinances or laws they consider
to be morally wrong risk legal
penalties prescribed by civil au-
thorities. However, not every con-
viction under the law represents
an offense with which an educa-
tional institution must concern it-
self. The student who violates
institutional regulations, such as
those relating to class attend-
ance, in the course of his pro-
test should be subjected to no
greater penalty than would nor-
mally be imposed if the violation
had not arisen in the course of
a public controversy. When stu-
dents ran into police difficulties
off the campus in connection with
what they regard as their politi-
cal rights-as, for example, tak-
ing part in sit-ins, picket lines,
demonstrations, riding on freedom
buses - the college authorities
should take every practical step
to assure themselves that such
students are protected in their
full legal rights and against abuse.
]V,
Responsibility of Faculty
for Procedural Due
Process in Cases of
Alleged Misconduct
The faculty has an obligation
to see that students are not dis-
ciplined for alleged misconduct
without adequate procedural safe-
guards. The folowing procedures
are recommended to assure rea-
sonable protection of the student,
a fair determination of the facts,
and the application of appropri-
ate sanctions.
NOTICE OF CONDUCT SUB-
JECT TO DISCIPLINE. Discipli-
nary proceedings should be in-
stituted only for alleged viola-
tions of adequately defined stand-
ards of conduct made known to
the students in advance, e.g.,
through publication in the cata-
logue or student handbook. Of-
fenses and penalties should be
made as clear as possible, avoid-
ing such vague phrases as "un-
desirable conduct" or "conduct in-
jurious to the best interests of the
institution."
CONDUCT OF INVESTIGA-
TION PRELIMINARY TO FOR-
MAL CHARGES. Except under
emergency circumstances, premis-
es occupied by students and the
personal possessions of students
should not be searched unless ap-
propriate authorization has been
obtained. For premises such as
dormitories controlled by the in-
stitution, an apropriate academic
authority should be designated to
whom application must be made
before a search can be conducted.
'the application should specify the

reasons for the search and the
objects or information sought. The
studentt .should be present, if pos-
sible, during the search. For prem-
ises not controlled by the insti-
tution, the ordinary requirements
for lawful search should be fol-
lowed.
Students detected or arrested in
the course of serious violations of
institutional regulation, cr infrac-
tions of ordinary law, should be
informed of their applicable rights
under institutional regulations
and general law. No form of har-
assment, including isolation from
counsel, should be used by insti-
tutional representatives to coerce
admissions of guilt or information
about conduct of other suspected
persons.
Across
Campus
The Summer Education Confer-
ence will feature Prof. Lawrence
Senesh, economist, speaking on
"Education's Responsibility in a
Changing Culture" in Schorling
Aud. at University High School at
9:00 a.m.
Symposium.. .
The Summer Biological Sym-
posium will concentrate on "Prob-
lems of Capillary Permeability in
Health and Disease" in Rackham
Amphitheater at 9:00 a.m.
Hemingway ..
Prof. Arthur Carr of the Eng-
lish department will speak on Er-
nest Hemingway's "A Moveable
Feast" in the Anderson Rm. of the
Michigan Union at 12:00 noon.
Previews...
The Audio-Visual Film Preview
will feature "Nick" and "Portugal"
in the Multipurpose Rm. of the
UGLI at 1:30 p.m.
Demonstration ...
Eugene Troth will speak on
"The Child as a Perceptive Lis-
tener" in a music school lecture
demonstration in the Recital Hall
of the music school at 1:30 p.m.
Reform...
Prof. William Clark Trow will
talk on "Educational Reform and
the Good Life" in an Alan S.
Whitney Lecture in Schorling Aud.
at University High School at
2:00 p.m.
Language...
Prof. Josef Vachek of the
Czechoslovakian Academy of Sci-
ence will talk on "The Hierarchi-
cal Relation of Written and Spok-
en Language" in Rackham Am-
phitheater at 7:30 p.m.

NOTICE OF CHARGES. The
student should be informed, in
writing, of the reasons for the
proposed disciplinary action with
sufficient particularity, and in suf-
ficient time, to ensure opportunity
for a proper defense.
TREATMENT OF STUDENT
PENDING FINAL ACTION. Pend-
ing action on the charges, the stat-
us of a student should not be
altered or his right to be present
on the campus and to attend
classes suspended except for rea-
sons relating to his physical or
emotional safety and well-being,
or for reasons relating to the
safety of students, faculty, and
university property.
HEARING. The formality of the
procedure to which a student is
entitled should be proportioned to
the sanctions which may be impos-
ed. Informal tribunals, such as
traffic bureaus or dormitory or
residential councils, may assess
minor penalties and some cases
may be closed with a reprimand.
But if, after investigation, it ap-
pears that the alleged offense may
expose the student to serious sanc-
tions, for instance expulsion, sus-
pension, substantial fine, or nota-
tion on a permanent record, he
should have the right to appeal
the initial judgment of his culp-
ability to a Hearing Board. The
Board should be composed of fac-
ulty members selected by the fac-
ulty or, subject to request by the
accused student, of faculty mem-
bers and students, the latter to
be selected by the student council
or another appropriate agency of
student government.
r-

1) The Hearing Board proceed-
ing should be de novo, that is,
without reference to any matter
previously developed in informal
proceedings. No member of the'
Hearing Board who is otherwise
interested in the particular case
should sit in judgment during that
proceeding.
2) The student appearing before
the Hearing Board should have
the right to be accompanied and
represented by an adviser of his
choice, and by legal counsel if he
so requests.
3) The burden of proof should
rest upon the officials instigat-
ing or responsible for establish-
ing the charge.
4) The student should be given
an opportunity to testify and to
present evidence and witnesses
relevant to the charge or the pen-
alties involved. Whenever possi-
ble, he should be givenean, op-
portunity to cross-examine adverse
witnesses. In no case should the
Board consider statements against
him unless he has been advised
of their content and of the.names
of those who made them, and un-
less he has been given an oppor-
tunity to rebut unfavorable in-
ferences which might otherwise be
drawn.
5) The decision should be bas-
ed solely upon mattersplacedin
evidence during the hearing. The
failure of the accused student to
testify (if such is the case) should
not be a factor in the decision

and improperly acquired evidence
should not be admitted.
6) A transcript of the hearing
should be made and, subject to
the student's waiver, the proceed-
Ing before the Hearing Board
should be open.
FURTHER RECOURSE. Subject
only to the student's right to ap-
peal to the highest institutional
authority or a designee, or to a
court as provided by law, the de-
cision of the Hearing Board should
be final.
Submitted by Phillip Mony-
penny (Political Science, Univer-
sity of Illinois), chairman of Com-
mittee S.
Members of Committee S: Philip
Appleman (English, Indiana Uni-
versity), C. William Heywood (His-
tory, Cornell College), Beatrice G.
Konheim (Physiology, Hunter Col-
Konheim (Physiology, Hunter Col-
lege) Lionel H. Newsom (Sociology,
Morehouse College), William Van
Alstyne (Law, Ohio State Univer-
sity), Robert Van Waes (History,
Washington Office).

Read
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ER 2nd
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Shows Start at
1:30-4:00-6:30 & 9:00

BAHA'!

DIAL 8-6416
DAILY AT
1:00-4:30-8:00
THE NO.1
ATTRACTION OF ALL TIME
SMPCIAL.POULA RrcEsi
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unthinkable to miss
iUSTARR"J
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ATTRACTION:

BEDTIME STORY"

...........

eyes that seek to know...

a

TOMORROW AT H LLEL
AT 7:30 P.M.

PROF. SAMUEL R. ELDERSVELD, Chairman
of the Dept. of Political Science
speaks on
"IMPRESSIONS OF INDIA"5

All Are Welcome

1429 Hill St.

TODAY

To know more than what's written
in books
To know more than what
is spoken
In short, to know about
the world around them
READ
U!4 i4 irw a

.

... .... ..._. r 4 : . h." . ."F1:J"; ..".b,....."":.'.. "-*..i{i;pN;Yr :.*.V.s tr.*.+".": ."sx
DAILY OFFICIAL -BU LLETI N
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PROFESSOR ARTHUR CARR, Dept. of English
discusses
"HEMI NGWAY'S
A MOVEABLE FEAST"
12:00 Noon, Michigan Unon, Anderson Room
ALL STUDENTS WELCOME
(Luncheon available for first 25 persons;
50c, barbecued hamburger on bun, fruit,
milk or coffee)
Sponsored by the Office of Religious Affairs

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
fficial publication of the Univer-
ty of Michigan for which The
ichigan Daily assumes noeditorial
!sponsibility. Notices should be sent
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room
64 Administration Building before
p.m. of the day preceding publica-
n, and by ? p.m. Friday for Satur-
ay and Sunday.
TUESDAY, JULY 14
Day alendar
itional Band Conductors Conference
rgistration, Michigan Union Ball-
n:, 8 Rain.
ummer Biological Symposium -
>blems of Capillary Permeability in
Ith and Disease": Rackham Amphi-
ire, 9 a.n.
xmner Education Conference-Law-
:e Senesh, economist, "Education's
>onsibility in a Changing Culture":
:rling Aud., University High School,

Audio-Visual Education Center Film
Preview-"Niok" and "Portugal": Mul-
tipurpose Room, Undergraduate Library,
1:30 p.m.
School of Music Lecture Demonstra-
tion-Eugene Troth, ' The Child as a
Perceptive Listener": Recital Hall,
School of Music, 1:30 p.m.
Alan S. Whitney Lecture - William
Clark Trow, "Educational Reform and
the Good Life": Schorling Aud., Uni-
versity High School, 2 p.m.

Placement

Oxford, Mich.-7th grade Sci.,
grade Math.

7th

TEACHER PLACEMENT:
The following schools have recorded
vacancies for the school year 1964-65:
Pontiac, Mich.--Early Elementary, 1,
2, & 3; and Later Elementary 6.
Ypsilanti, Mich.-Auto Mechanics.
Hanover, Mich.-J.H. General Science
Au Gres, Mich.--H.S. Chemistry/Phys-
ics; H.S. Alg./Geom./Adv. Alg.

Holly, Mich.--H.S. Math/Asst. Bskt./
Head Baseball.
Dearborn Heights, Mich.-J.H. Vocal
Music; J.H. Science.
For additional information contact the

.'I

Bureau of Appointments, 3200
663-1511, Ext. 3547.

SAB,

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Department of Linguistics Forum Lee-
ture - Josef Vachek, Czechoslovakian
Academy of Science, "The Hierarchical
Relation of Written and Spoken Lan-
guage": Rackham Amphitheatre, 7:30
p.m.
I.S.T. Special Summer Lectures --
Dr. Ian M. Mills of the University of
Reading, England, will speak on
"Theory of Molecular Force Fields and
Molecular Dynamics"-Lecture Seven to
be given on July 14 at 1 p.m. in Rm.
1400 of the Chemistry Bldg.
Doctoral Examination for James War-
ren Davis, Political Science; thesis:
"Executive Roles in Technical Bureaus.
A Studv o~f Senior Exectives ina F'ive i

For

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