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July 09, 1964 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1964-07-09

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THURSDAY, JULY B, 1964

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

VAVI PITMV

TH U R D A Y, JUL 9, 964 ,i

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'U' Gets Health Research Grant

Educators Receive Grant to
Continue Soviet School Study

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

-------------- a

The University has received a*
grant of $180,000 from the Chil-
dren's Bureau of the United States
Department of Health, Education
and Welfare to launch a long-term
research program in the areas of
maternal and child health, and
crippled children services.
The program will be directed by
Prof. Donald C. Smith, chairman
of the department of health de-
velopment in the public health
school. HEW is expected to fur-
nish continuing support for the
program over a number of years,
Prof. Smith said.
The award to the University is
one of the first major grants made
by the Children's Bureau.
Regional Center
Prof. Myron E. Wegman, dean
of the public health school, said
the long-term aid will enable the
University to "establish a region-
al center of research competence
whose mission will include trans-
lation of research results into tan-
gible health services for mothers
and children."
Some of our areas to be ex- -
plored, the dean said, will be the
medical and social problems of
handicapped children; an assess-
ment of existing programs and
services for these children; a re-
examination of the natural his-
tory of chronic diseases of child-
hood; and studies of the financial
aspects and institutional care pro-
grams for children.
Active Roles
Official health agencies, private i
physicians, hospitals and clinics inl
a five-state Midwestern area are
expected to play active roles in
the research program.c
The University was chosen be- I
cause of its medical and public
health resources, and because of
its existing close relationships with f
official health agencies in thec
Midwest. Prof. Smith pointed outs
that "a significant part of thet
program will entail close working
arrangements with these agen-k
cies."

PROF. MYRON E. WEGMAN, dean of the public health school,
and Prof. Donald C. Smith, head of the school's department of
health development, will' participate in a research program fi-
nanced by the United States Department of Health, Education and
Welfare.
APPLIED SCIENCE
Youtz- Views Art, Architecture
As Linked, N ot Antagonistic

Across
Campus
The Audio Visual Education
Center will present a film preview
featuring "John Fitzgerald Ken-
nedy" and "Quest for Freedom" in
the Multipurpose Rm. of the
UGLI at 1:30 p.m.
American Negro ...
The Summer Session Special
Program "The American Negro in
Transition-1964" will present
Prof. Hale A. Woodruff of New
York University speaking on "The
Role of the Negro Artist in Amer-
ica Today" in Aud. B at 4:10 p.m.
Criteria . ..
The Department of Linguistics
Forum Lecture will feature Guy
Cappelle, of the Bureau d'Etudes
et de Liaison, Paris, speaking on
Linguistic Criteria for the Selec-
tion of Items in Foreign Language
Teaching" in Rackham Amphi-
theater at 7:30 p.m.
CORE Meeting . . .
A specially called general mem-
bership meeting of Ann Arbor
CORE will be held at the Ann
Arbor Community Center, 625 N.
Main St., at 8 p.m. The meeting
is being called to determine
CORE's position on school inte-
gration proposals recommended by
the special study committee of the
Ann Arbor Board of Education.
Williams .. .
The University Players will pre-
sent Tennessee William's "Summer
and Smoke" in the Lydia Mendel-
ssohn Theatre at 8 p.m.

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Students in the college of arch-
tecture and design are discover-
ing that art and science are no
onger antagonists but different
ways of dealing with our physi-
cal and cultural environments,
Dean Philip N. Youtz said recently.
"Until very recently most artists
feared science and believed it was
destructive of aesthetic values,"
stated the dean, who began re-
tirement furlough July 1.
"But in the last few years the
faculty and students of the col-
lege have come to accept a new
philosophy," he added.
"Applied science plays an in-
creasing role in the education of
the architect. Students are
electing courses in psychology, in
the chemistry of color, in the met-
allurgical techniques of casting.
Basic courses in landscape archi-
tecture deal with soil mechanics
and horticulture. The design pro-
fessions today are depending on
knowledge as well as on intui-
tion for their practice."
Dean Youtz stated' that the em-
phasis on scientific thinking has
greatly stimulated the students.
"They are enthusiastic about the
new plastics, the modern com-
ponents and the novel systems of
construction. Never having been
acquainted, with the old crafts
they have no difficulty in accept-
ing the factory niade products.
When the Producers Council puts
on an exhibit, the students crowd
around the booths to discover the
latest materials on the market.
"They are interested in the
mechanical equipment that is
transforming buildings into auto-
matically controlled machines for
comfortable living," he said. "The
modern generation does not wor-
ry over the possibility that fac-
tory production will destroy the
architectural profession. Students

are confident they can design for
machine production even more
successfully than their predeces-
sors did for handcraft items."
Anth ropoli gists
Studying Sites
By The Associated Press
Two ancient Indian sites near
Grand Rapids and Saginaw are
being excavated this summer by
University anthropologists.
Work is being supported by the
National Science Foundation.
The Grand Rapids site, said
Prof. James Griffin, anthropology
museum director, is "one of the
best Hopewell burial mound groups
in the country."
Indians of the Hopewell culture
are thought to have moved into
southern and western Michigan
from Illinois about the time of
the birth of Christ. They are be-
lieved the first of the agricultural
Indians to invade the territory.
The Saginaw site was describ-
ed by Prof. Griffin as one of
multiple occupancy, with relics of
early woodland Indians at lower
levels followed by those of the
Hopewell culture. They.earliest oc-
cupancy is estimated at dating
back to about 500 years before the
birth of Christ.

A grant of approximately $45,-
000 has been awarded to three
faculty members of the education
school by the United States Of-
fice of Health, Education and
Welfare.
Profs. William K. Medlin, Wil-
liam M. Cave and Finley Carpen-
ter will use the grant to continue
research study on "the relation-
ship between socio-economic de-
velopment and educational re-
quirements in a technically un-
derdeveloped society: Soviet Uzbe-
kistan."
The faculty members return in
May from the Soviet Republic of
Uzbekistan, which adjoins Afghan-
istan, having spent around six
weeks studying the historical, so-
ciological and psychological there.
More Research
* The new grant will make possi-
ble additional research to show
how the general economic devel-
opment of the area relates to the
preparation of youth to serve in
the changing socio-economic or-
der. This phase will be concluded
next summer.
"We found motivation among
young Uzbeks to achieve was
high," Prof. Cave reported. "Those
Uzbeks who chose to accept So-
viet values, notwithstanding the
authoritarian order, have risen to
positions of leadership in the So-
viet republic. The schools have
been instrumental in providing the
native population with the skills
necessary for social mobility."
Culturally Rooted
Prof. Cave said most Uzbeks fa-
vor Western dress habits and cus-
toms although some more cultural-
ly-rooted urbanites seem to be re-
sisting these changes. He said they
found the traditional role of Is-
lam in the Uzbek society is dim-
inishing in importance.
Prof. Cave said the Soviet school
has emerged as the primary agen-
cy for inducting the young into
the Soviet social order. "The
boarding schools are particularly
effective social systems inasmuch
as they maintain an extended per-
iod of control over the children."
He noted that a significant per-
centage of the native women now
work and have thus gained a
measure of economic independ-
ence.
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation, 1429
Hill St. At Hillel, Wed., July 15, 7 p.m.,
Prof. Samuel J. Eldersveld, chairman of
the Department of Political Science,
speaks on "Impressions of India." All
welcome.
NAGILA DANCERS
Open Session
Tonight 1:30 P.M.
HILLEL
1429 Hill
ALL WELCOME

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PROF. FINLEY CARPENTER
To Hold -Talks
On Diseases
Between 800 and 1000 persons
are expected to attend a 2-day
conference on "Some Basic As-
pects of Cancer" at Rackham Lec-
ture Hall Saturday and Sunday.
All physicians in the Washte-
naw area have been invited to
attend this Sixth Annual Merck
Sharp & Dohme Conference. Phy-
sicians attending the meeting will
hear 10 guest participants.
Co-sponsoring the conference
with the Department of Postgrad-
uate Medicine are the Michigan
State Medical Society, the Wayne
State University School of Medi-
cine, the Michigan Department of
Health, and the Thomas Henry
Simpson Institute for Medical Re-
search.

E xYE t . ce Admission Test for Graduate Study
Sin Business: Candidates taking the Ad-
Manufacturina Workshop-Registra- mission Test for Graduate Study in
tion, Michigan Union Ballroom, 8 a.m. Business on Sat., July 11, are request-
ed to report to Room 130 Business Ad-
ministration Bldg. at 8:45 Saturday
Audio-Visual Education Center Film morning,
Preview-"John Fitzgerald Kennedy"
and "Quest for Freedom": Multipur- Graduate Record Examination: Can-
pose Room, Undergrad Library, 1:30 p.m. didates taking the Graduate Record
Examination on Sat., July 11, are re-
quested to report to Aud. B, Angell
Summer Session Special Program - Hall at 8:45 Saturday morning.
"ThIe American Negro in Transition: _____
1964'-Male A. Woodruff, Professor of
Art Education. New York University,
"The Role of the Negro Artist in Amer- Pla cement
ica. Today": Aud. B, Angell Hall, 4:10
p.m. Reception for Prof. Woodruff after
the lecture, South Gallery, Museum ofANNOUNCEMENT:
Art. D - fn r - n or rs .rra xw .

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Dept. of Linguistics Forum Lecture-'
Guy Capelle, Bureal d'Etudes et de+
Liaison, Paris, "Linguistic Criteria for
the Selection of Items in Foreign
Language Teaching": Rackham Amphi-
theatre, 7:30 p.m.+
University Players, Dept. of Speech
Production-Tennessee williams' "Sum-
mer and Smoke": Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre, 8 p.m.
F.S.T. Special Summer Lectures -
Dr. Ian M. Mills of the University of
Reading, England, will speak on
Theory of Molecular Force Fields and
Molecular Dynamics"-Lecture Four to
be given on July 9 at 1 p.m. in Rm. 1400
Chemistry Bldg.
Mathematics Movie: Mathematical
Association of America move in "Mathe-
matical Induction" starring Prof. Leon
Henkin, University of California. Thurs-
d i, July 9, 1:30 p.m., Rm. 35, Angel
Hail.
'A GAY ROMP!
COMPLETELY MAD!"
-N.Y. Daily News

Peace Corps-Today and Friday are
the last days that the Peace Corps will
be on campus. They have information
centers in the lower lobby of the
Michigan Union and on the Diagonal.
They will give the placement test at 1
p.m. on Thurs. (today) and at 9 a.m.
on Friday in the Union. The regular
Peace Corps exam will be given at 8'30
2 ANIMAL ADVENTURES TO
DELIGHT THE YOUNG IN HEART'
Share fun
and excitement
with an Eskimo
Teenager
and her >
wilderness pet!

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
of ficial public ation of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily a ,siuts no editorial
res oim bilty. Notices A hould b e, se nit
in TYP1ERi7TTEN form to Room
3,i4 Administration Building before
S.,of the duay preceding pubiica-
tion, and by p.m. Friday for Satur-
day and S"nday.
T1URSDAY, JULY 9
Pei v C 1 )n(Itir

" a.m. on Sat, at the Downtown Post
t Not6/*(1 00CeS Office at Main & Catherine.
Parking Notice: The following park- POSITION OPENINGS:
lng areas will be closed for construe- Navy Dept.-Civilian job opportuni-
tion purposes: !ties as follows: Contract Negotiators,
Effective July 7: The South Bay of Ops. Res. Analysts at Hdqts. of Navy
Staff Student Meter parking lot W-26, Dept.; Digital Computer Programmers,
400 block of Thompson Street and the Math, Ops. Res. Analysts, Personnel
parking bay directly west of Jefferson Res. Specialists, Tech. Manual Writer-
apartments, 500 block of East Jefferson Editor in Wash., D.C.; Accountant, Ad-
Street. min. Officer, Contract Specialist, 'Posi-
Effective July, additional spaces on tion Classification Specialist, Person-
the east side of the Jefferson apart- nel Staffing Specialist in Maryland;
ments. Mgmt. Analyst, in Va.; also various
other positions & locations.

"

U.S. Civil Service, 7th Region--Open-
ings Include: Digital Computer Sys.
tems, Procurement Officer, Supv. Ad-
min., Engineers, Psychiatrist, Nurses,
Physicians, Chemists, Phys. Therapist,
Social Worker, etc.
U.S. Civil Service-Openings for As-
tronomers in Navals Labs of the Po-
tomac. BS degree with at least 12 hrs.
of Astro. & courses in Math & Physics
totaling at least 18 hrs. Study of Math
must have included differential & in-
tegral calculus. For higher level posi-
tions, exper. Is required.
For further information, please call
General Div., Bureau of Appointments,
3200 SAB, Ext. 3544.

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FRIDAY & SATURDAY

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UNIVERSI
Ten,
an'
Ton
8:00 P.M
Box Office
after 12
COM

nessee

TY PLAYERS (Dept. of Speech)

Williams'

d SMOKE
sight thru Saturday
A., Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre

UMMER

open daily
:30 p.m.

$1.50, $1.00
plus 25c for each Fri. and

ING NEXT WEEK!
A delightf
gentle,
genial satir
human behi
/SPEWAC'S

t

Sat.

"Highest Rating ! You are going to cheer! Magnificefit !' Among few film classics!"-Kenneth Banghart,
CBS News

"Never before has a spectacle been more carefully, lavishly, stunningly produced"- Life Magazine
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"Overwhelming Make no mistake, you are not going to see its like again!" -N.Y. Daily News
tColossal! Super-spectacle' Magnificent as money and the tremendous Todd-AO screen can make it!"
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in the realm of movies in many a year!" -Bosley Crowther, N, Y. Times

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