100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 30, 1964 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1964-06-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, JUNE, SO. 1964

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, JUNE 30, 1964 TilE MICIJTGAN flAtLY

INSURANCE SURVEY
Rising College Costs Predicted

NEW YORK-College costs will
continue to soar in the 1964-65
school year, with private men's
colleges in the northeast and
large private co-educational col-
leges in the west leading the rise
with a median increase of eight
per cent over the year before, the
Life Insurance Agency Manage-
ment Association reported yester-
day.

Thurber Reveals Plans
For Board of Education
(Continued from Page 1
dation. The Russell Report on
At the same time. Thurber be- higher education in 1958 conclud-
lieves that the board "should haveed that a coordinating agency
the power and inclination to r -would be necessary:
quest a large amount of budget T olc aacnenn a
information-and form independ- To collect data concerning fa-
ent judgments on the schools' i- cilities, finances and general oper-
en judgment oteations of all state institutions:
nancial needs."

TOMORROW at HILLEL, at 7:30
REV. PAUL R. DOTSON, Dir., Protestant Fdn,
for International Student's
speaks on
"SO UTH ERN HOSPITALITY:
MISSISSIPPI STYLE"

PAGE THRE

;E.
N

In dollars, the median increases
in total basic charges will be
$130 in private men's colleges, $78
in private women's colleges, $100
in private co-educational colleges,
and $23 to ii-state or college dis-
trict residents in public co-educa-
tional colleges.
Tn the nasp of r ivate men's

This represents an increase in colleges, these costs will be about
college costs of about 50 per cent $640 higher than they were eight
in the last eight years. years ago.I

Professors See Conditions
As Amenable To Bargaining

Total median basic charges for
1964-65 will be:
Private men's colleges: North-
east, $2,430; north central, $1,-
760; south, $1700 and west, $1,990.
Private women's colleges: North-
east, $2,235: north central,8$1,512;
south, $1,747; and west, $1,815.
Private co-educational colleges:
Northeast, $2,075; north central,
$1,663; south, $1,297; and west,
$1,663.
Public co-educational colleges:
Northeast, $981; north central,
$951; south, $762; and west, $988.
out - of - college - district students
will be $1,226 for the entire coun-
try. Tuition charges are smaller
than room and board charges in
these colleges, except for students
from outside the region for which
they were organized.
Nationally, median increases
for the coming school year, by
types of colleges are: Private
men's colleges, six per cent; pri-
vate women's colleges, five per
cent; private co-educational col-
leges, six per cent; public co-edu-
cational colleges, three per cent.
In every case, the significant in-
creases will be in tuition and
fees. Only slight increases will take
place in room and board charges.

CHAIRMAN RICE
State Teachers

Thurber is referring here to one
of the more controversial powers
given to the board. This is the au-I
thority to advise the Legislature!
on the financial needs of the var-
ious higher institutions--and of
education overall.

To make annual estimates of
the needs of each institution for
transmittal to executive and legis-
lative officials:
To advise the state agencies on
general policy matters ranging
from the establishment of new in-
stitutions to the location of a
third medical school.
R0 ~nnnt c-,tn -ann A ohkfoirvhoc

Opponents of this commitment
Attenid nsi tute have argued that the power of

All Are Welcome

1429 Hill St.

Admission is Free

woodwommom"

(Continued from Page 1)
employment in D e t r o i t, the
chances are that the final overall
settlements will exceed the guide-
lines."
Important Factor
He did not see this exceeding of
the guidelines as necessarily in-
flationary. "I have no presump-
tion that this should generate
price increases this year." How-
ever, he went on to comment that
the wage settlements this year
"might be an important factor
which would adjust wages for
1965." He also cited the higher
and growing state of the economy,
the low level of unemployment
W NHAT'S
NEW
IIN THE JULY
ATLANTIC?
"Disturbed Americans": A Special
Supplement on Mental illness reports
on'College Students in Trouble (1 out
of every 9 needs medicalIleave, hospi-
talization, or psychiatric treatment).
Plus The Meaning of Mental Illness,
The Child's Changing Brain, Treat-
ment in England and America, Psy-
chiatrists and the Poor, and other
timely reports.
ALSO: "Peter Ustinov Speaking to
Henry Brandon": How Ustinov came
to bethe man he is -- actor, playwright,
novelist, director and producer in films,
radio, television, and on the stage.
Bergen Evans: "Milk, Beads, Thongs,
and the Sspiral Nebulae": The strange
use of words in describing
the incomprehensible
theories of astronomy.
Every month the
Atlantic provides. a.
platform for many of
the world's most ar-
ticulate and creative
men and women.The f
result is always enter.
taining and informa
tlve~often brilliant, oc
casionally profound.
More and more, the
Atlantic Is finding Its
way into the hands of ON
discerning readers. s SALE
Get your copy today. NOW

(hence a tightened labor market)
and high profits as possible causes
for future inflation. "These fac-
tors, rather than auto wages of
themselves, would spur inflation
in, 1965," he estimated.
For this year, Ryder saw a dis-
tinct possibility that labor would
make heavy inroads in fringe
benefits and retirement demands.
"Managements generally see the
need for making more work avail-
able to union members," he said.
"The companies will listen to labor
demands in good faith."
This good faith will not extend
to allow the UAW to make gains
with one company - and then
pressthe others for similar con-
cession. Ryder emphasized. "I
think that management more than
ever will be taking a joint stand-
setting forth an industry posi-
tion."
Underscoring their overall op-
timism, the professors noted the
political overtones of the negotia-
tions. "Both sides will be receiv-
ing unofficial political pressure--
from both parties," Levinson con-
tended. "Both sides will work to
avoid positive governmental par-
ticipation and intervention."

A group of carefully selectedl
Michigan school teachers is cur-
rently attending the Summer In-
stitute for Teachers of English.
"The institute," Prof. Warner
G. Rice, chairman of the Eng-
lish department, said recently, "is
not a summer meeting for the ex-
change of theoretical ideas. It con-
sists of a series of courses, forj
which participants receive grad-
uate credit, designed especially
for classroom teachers."
Its purpose is to improve the
teaching of English in Michigan
high schools by presenting to
teachers ideas and materials they
can use in their own classrooms.

the purse will bring state boardi borne out the ideas as outlined in
members snooping into every fi- this report. The past few years
nancial decision which governing has seen governor and legislators
boards make. deluged with institutional requests
Thurber sees no conflict. "I for funds-many more than avail-
would hope that the prestige, sin- able-without criteria to evaluate
cerity and interest of the new them. This year, for example, the
board could be so great that con- 10 state-supported schools asked
flict would not arise." for $144 million combined. They
Opponents of the board say it's received only $131 million.
bound to. What has upset many With the idea of a third non-
of them is that the board repre- political, non-educator assessor in
sents a coercive force, a symbol mind, Gov. George Romney es-
that voluntary coordination is be- tablished a "blue ribbon" citizens
ing abandoned. group to evaluate higher education'
Indeed, the problems of state- needs last fall. Their first report
wide rivalry between institutions was accepted almost in full. It
.has been at the board's very foun- recommended $135 million for the

Rent a TV this Summer
NEW 19" G.E. PORTABLES
only $10.00 per month
FREE DELIVERY & SERVICE
TV set on display at Follett's Bookstore
NJAC TV
phone: NO 2-5671
Now

DIAL
8-64 16

4~1~ IU

ENDS
WEDNESDAY

---- ;stareI sc'hools. only $4 million above

i

. .. ... ... ...........,.......,......,...,........................,.............:":::.::":::::. ..v>:."::r::::::::::. ::.::::' :::... . . .:::. ........... .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111 111.1 ~uv VI
the ltiatetotals appropria ted
by the Legislature. The blue rib-
T boners have now turned to con-
DA LY OFFICIAL BULLETIN structing a long-range blueprint of
higher education needs. Target
date: this fall.

,
,

...... ........... .. _

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
otticial publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsioility. Notices should be sent
in TIAIEWIJTTEN formn to Room
3564 Administration Building before
2 p.m. of the day preceding pullica-
tion, and by 2 p.m. Friday for Satur-
day and Sunday.

General Notices
A Few More Ushers are needed f or
the Series of Piano Concerts to be
given in Rackham Aud. during the
month of July. Please call Mr. Warner
at NO 8-8597 if you are interested in
ushering. This request is not for stu-
dents alone. Anyone is eligible.

WHITE
LEVI'8'

TUESDAY, JUNE 30
Audio-Visual Education Center Sum-
mer Session Preview presents a movie
Day fJE'l1 I(L(lr about the Universe, "Why Explore
Space?" at 1:30 p.m. today in the Un-
Bureau of Industrial Realtions Per- dergrad Library Multipurpose Room.
sonnel seminar No. 123b-George Odi-----
orne, director, and Robert House, re-
search associate, Bureau of Industrial DlqCG11t ,tt
Relations; James Bulloch, Assistant It
Professor of Accounting, "Management
by Objectives - Results-Oriented Ap- ANNOUNCEMENTS:
praisals System": School of Business
Administration, 8:30 a.m. Youth Opportunity Centers-As a part
of the war against poverty, Youth Op-
Conference on Aging-Michigan Un- portunity Centers will soon be estab.
ion, 9 a.m. At these centers, youth will be inter-
viewed. counseled, tested, placed in
High School Journalism Workshop- jobs or referred. 2000 staff trainees
Journalism Department, 10 a.m. are geing recruited. Seeking young
grads with outstanding personal traits,
School of Music Lecture - Rudolf pref. with some bkgd. in soc., psych.,
Schoch, guest lecturer, "The Use of soc. work, educ., counseling or related
the Recorder-Teaching Music in the fields. Candidates who qualify to be-
Swiss Schools": Recital Hall School of come Counselor Aides will train for
Music, 1:30 p.m. 8-10 weeks at one of 15 universities, be-
ginning July 15. More info. at Bureau of
School of Music Recital - Jerome Appointments, 3200 SAB,

in Econ. only. BA & MA level. Posi-
tions: Economists.z
THURS., JULY 9-
General Foods Corp., While Plains,
N.Y.-Seeking MEN, May & Aug. grads
(p.m. only). BA or MA or BBA. Psych.,
Ind. Reis. or anyone interested in
Personnel work. Positions: Personnel
Admin. Traiiee Program.1
POSITION OPENINGS:
Company in Evansville, Id. - Open-
ing for Production Promotion Manager.
Degree in Journ., English, Marketing orI
Advertising. Requires at least 3 yrs.
of prod. promotion or sales promotion
exper. This exper. should have been
obtained in a company selling con-
sumer, nondurable products.
YWCA, Lansing, Mich.--Opening for
Special Programs Dir. (female). BA in
appropriate area (soc. work, social sci-
ences, educ., reli.); work on MA de-
gree in related 'fields. Require preyvious
work with children & adults in settings
requiring the use of social work, in-
dividual counseling or special trug.
methods.
County of Calhoun, Marshall, Mich.-
Position opening on Case Work Staff
for a man, who will work mostly with
delinquent children. Pertinent bkgd. &1
exper.
For further information, please call
Gen. Div., Bureau of Appointments,
3200 SAB, Ext. 3544.
TEACHER PLACEMENT:
The following schools will be in the
Bureau of Appointments to interview
prospective teachers for the 1964-65
school year.
WED., JULY 8-

Thurber is "very impressed"
with the group and . "promises to,
evaluate their decisions with great
care." He sees the state board
partly as an extension of the blue
ribbon committee, hoping that the
"blue ribbon report can provide a
ireal springboard for the new state
board to consider in its delibera-
tions."
He, like most educators, sees a
very unclear future for higher ed-
ucation. With its future hanging
on an un-formulated blue ribbon
report, a theoretical state board
and eight not-yet-nominated citi-
zens, this view has great logic.
TRX bo5'f FBI~
Q TJZ EDJ~

4 To the beach or to
the market-it's the
newest idea in low-
cost, high-fun trans-
portation.
Worth its weight
in pleasure and eas
ier to ride than a
bicycle.
Honda of Ann Arbor

1!

Todd' s
/
OZ'S

Jelinek, cello; Rhea Kish, piano, Rack-
ham Lecture Hall, 8:30 p.m.
Department of Linguistics Forum Lec-
ture-Arthur W. Burks, "Philosophy
end Language": Rackham Amphitheatre,
7:30 p.m.
FIAT
Sales and Service
Herb Estes
AUTOMART
319 West Huron
665-3688

Peace Corp.-Will .visit the U. of M.
July 6-11. They will have information
centers in the Lower Lobby of the
Mich. Union and on the Diagonal.
Make appointments with representa-
tives for placement test.
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS, Bureau of
Appointments-Seniors & grad students.'
please call Ext. 3544 for appointments
with the following:
WED., JULY 1-
General Dynamics Corporate Office,
New York, N.Y.-Will be interviewing
MEN only for their Management Train-
ing Program. Degree majors in Econ..
Poll. Sci., History, & General Liberal
Arts. Make appointments with Thomas
J. Brown for morning in Bureau of
Appts., in afternoon at Bus. Ad. Feb.,
May & Aug. grads. U.S. citizenship.
THURS., JULY 2-
Central Intelligence Agency, Washing-
ton, D.C.-Men & women. John For-
rester will be interviewing all day at
the Bureau of Appts. Seeking degrees

1906 Packard

1209 S. Univ.

Ann Arbor

Sell
Sea
S narks
earn $25 per boat
Here's a summer sales oppor-
tunity that combines sun, fun
and money in just-right big,
healthy proportions. You earn
$25 for every Snark you sell.
And here's a boat that's easy to
sell. The SEA SNARK is a full-
size 11 ft. sailboat, complete
with red-striped, nylon sail.
Sells for only $99.75 (plus
$3.50 packing cost FOB fac-
tory).
For all the facts, literature, and
promotional material, write to-
day to Alex Roth, Snark Prod-
ucts, Inc., 1580 Lemoine
Avenue, Fort Lee, New Jersey.

1~0
t

I

i

except Soc. St., Music, Art, and Boys 665-9281
Los Angeles, Calif.-All Elen. and Sec.
Grand Rapids, Mich. - (Godwin
Heights)-E. Elem., Math, Engl., Engl.!
Ger., Engl./Soc. S., Elena. Vocal/Strings.
THURS., JULY 9- W E LCOME
Los Angeles, Calif.-Same as above.
T UES., JULY 21-
Detroit, Mich.-Elem., Spec. Ed,, Sc.B CK
Make appointments now. STUDENTS
For additional information & ap-
pointments contact the Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 Student Activities -5 Barbers to serve you-
Bldg., 663-1511, Ext. 3547.
-- - -at
TRIUMPH U-M Barbers
Sale an SericeN. Univ. near Kresge's
Sales and Service
I and
H erb Estes -7 Barbers to serve you-
at
AUTOMART
319 west Huron The Dascola Barbers
665-3688 near Mich. Theatre

DIAL
2-6264

ETATE40

ENDS WEDNESDAY
Shows at 1:05-3:45
6:15 and 8:50

DWARFING THE MIGHTIEST!!

Th J. Arthur Rnt
orsaniktion Presents AND
A MAN
10 WOMAN WOULD
TOCH!
Coming Thursday "HUD" and
"LOVE WITH THE PROPER STRANGER"
THE
BEA TL ES
IAre Back
Singing the title song from
their new film-
"A HARD DAY'S NIGHT"
WINO
TWO FREE TICKETS to the
BEATTLES' LIVE CONCERT at
Olympia Sept. 6.
Come in for details
discount records,
300 SO. STATE 665-3679
presente by
THE UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY
iun m er ocer .Serie
FOUR PIANO RECITALS
In RACKH-AM AUDITORIUM
GYORGY SAN DOR--Thurs,, July 2,8:.30
Fantasy &,Fugue in G minor...........Bch-Liszt
Fantasy, Op. 17 ...... . ... ... . ..' . . . Schummnn
Fantasia quasi Sonata (Apres une Lecture de Dante) .... Liszt
Fantasy in F minor, Op. 49 .............. .......... Chopin
Variations on a Theme by Paganini................ Brahms
DANIEL BARENDOIM--Tues., July 7, 8:30
Young Israeli Pianist

4I

An Embassy Pictures Release TECINICOLOR TECHNIRAMA
STHURSDAY,;

S the M-G-M PRESENTS A LAWRENCE WEINGARTEN PRODUCTION ""''"'
UA
:S UsntM~iUYRown
STARRING
DEBBIE REYNOLDS KARVE"PRESNELL STORY
SO1COlComing: DAVID NIVEN in "BEDTIME STORY"

-

AUSTI N
DIAMOND
CORPORAT ION
1209 S. University 663-7

ml~

IL

Mm

~~ftL k

SHOWS
2-5 and 8 C

'RrcCao !a Modern Ccioiino

-

A towering triumph of ad-
venture and excitement!t
The Winner of 27 Inter-
national Awards...
7 Academy Awards!

AT
O'CLOCK

For...
z. LINEN SUPPLY SERVICE
-' INDUSTRIAL LAUNDRY
5 PAPER PRODUCTS AND
THERMO CUPS

Sonatai
Sonata
Sonata

EUGENE ISTOMIN--Mon., July 20,8:30
Sonata in A major . ... .. Haydn
Sonata in C major, Op. 53 "Waldstein".........Beethoven
Sonata in Three Movements . . . Stravinsky
Variations on a Theme by Handel, Op. 24 .. Brahms
RALPH VOTAPEK-Thurs., July 29, 8:30
Winner. Van Clibur, International Competitions. 1962

in E-flat Major, Op. 81a ("Les Adieux") . . . . Beethoven
in F minor, Op. 57 ("Apossionota").... ....Beethoven
in C minor, Op. 1l ....................Beethoven

A

- ' ~ ..,....,.q~\. I & / N2~ I 3

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan