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August 12, 1964 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1964-08-12

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE'

ommunist

Bloc

Perp lexes

U4.S.

not only involved in the political
dispute; they range far beyond it.
One uncertainty debated by dip-
lomatic officials recently in pri-
vate conferences at the State De-
partment is how far the East-
ern European countries can loosen
their ties with Russia without a
risk of triggering Soviet counter-
action. Another issue is whether
there is a point at which assist-
ance to countries still in the So-
viet orbit tends to became "ap-
peasement" of Communism.
On the basis of all the infor-
mation U.S. diplomatic and intel-
ligence agents have been able to
gather, the Soviet Communist bloc
is caught up in the grip of a slow
moving but significant crisis. This
crisis is compounded of issues of
resources, unworkable doctrinal
theories, excessive central control
and other mistakes which are
slowing badly needed economic
growth and which have turned
food surplus countries into food
importing countries.
Deep Roots
The roots of the problem go
deeply back into the post-war his-
tory of Europe, for the fact is that
the monolithic Empire of the late
Josef Stalin began breaking up
in the very year that it achieved
its highest peak of centralized
Communist control.
That was in 1948, when Presi-
dent Tito of Yugoslavia rejected
Stalin's efforts to take over his
country's economy and its gov-
ernment. In little more than a
year the United States, Britain
and France began pouring mil-
lions of dollars into Yugoslavia to
keep it alive as a symbol of in-
dependence from the power and
authority of Moscow.
Today the policy of the admin-
istration of President' Lyndon B.
Johnson, having evolved out of en-
couragement given by the United
States to other nationalistic hopes
in Eastern Europe, is defined gen-
erally' as a policy of flexibility.
Secretary of State Dean Rusk:
however, has thought it necessary
in recent months to make speeches
on "why we treat different Com-
munist countries differently" and
in Congress the expenditure of
money in aid, the expansion of
trade and other actions flowing
from the policy have been chal-
lenged.
Against this background - and
with full knowledge here that U.S.

allies are rushing headlong into
all kinds of trade arrangements
with Russia and the Eastern Eu-
ropean countries-the political ar-
gument over this question of for-
eign policy is now rather sharply
defined. The definition is to be
found in statements laid down by
President Johnson, Rusk, Chair-
man J. W. Fulbright (D-Ark) of
the Senate Foreign Relations Com-
mittee, the Republican platform
recently adopted in San Francis-
co, and Soviet Premier Nikita S
Khrushchev himself. Here is the
way the differences are spelled

al independence and open socie- "If we persist in the view that
ties." c sall Communist nations are equal-
Khrushchev, speaking at War- ly hostile and equally threatening
saw in July, accused the Western to the West . . . the West may en-
countries of fanning nationalism 1 force upon the Communist bloc
in Eastern Europe and employing a degree of unity which the So-
economic resources for political viet Union has shown itself to be
purposes. He said: "All this is quite incapable of imposing ...
intended to undermine our unity, "If we are willing to re-examine
to divide our countries." the view that all Communist re-
Sen. Barry Goldwater (R-Ariz) gimes are alike in the threat which
accepting the presidential nomi- they pose for the West-a view
nation at the Republican National which had a certain validity in
Convention: "We must make clear Stalin's time-then we may be able
that until its goals of conquest to exert an important influence
are absolutely renounced, and its on the course of events within a

Soviet Control of Satellites Slackened

. STARTING IN 1948 WHEN MARSHAL TITO OF YUGOSLAVIA (far left) rejected Josef Stalin's attempts to control the bloc coun-
,try. The United States began pouring in economic aid and thus created the dilemma which it faces today: How far can it go to help re-
bellious satellites without incurring the wrath of Russia? Increasingly, leaders like Wladyslaw Gomulka of Poland (second from left),
Janos Kadar of Hungary (second from right) and Georgi Gheorgiu-Dej of Romania (far right), have led their countries on courses in-
dependent of Moscow.

out in pointed quotations from the,
contestants themselves:
Probing
President Johnson, before a
luncheon in New York April 20,
having stressed a need for both
military defenses and diplomatic
probing to improve relations: "Our
guard is up but our hand is out."
Rusk, in a February speech de-
fending different policies toward
different Communist countries:'
"It is our policy to do what we
can to encourage evolution in the
Communist world toward nation-

relations with all nations temper- divided Communist world."
ed, Communism and the govern- Over .a period of 15 years the
ments it now controls are enemies United States has invested at least
of every man on earth who is or $3 billion in encouraging Commu-
wants to be free." nist governments to take and hold
The Republican platform, in s nationalist positions either in
paragraph calling for firmness to- spite of Moscow policies or to the
ward Communism: "It is accom- fullest extent Moscow will allow.

modation, not opposition, that en-
courages a hostile nation to re-
main hostile and to remain aggres-
sive."
Fulbright, who has been urg-
ing Americans to think "unthink-
able thoughts":

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN'

Recital Hall in the music school
bldg.
8:30 p.m.-Arlyn Fuerst, organi-
ist will give a degree recital in
Hill Aud.
Tomorrow
8:30 a.m.-The Michigan Union
will host the fourth day of the!
high school Leadership Training
Conference, sponsored by the Bu-
reau of School Services.
8:30 p.m. - Elizabeth Erskine,
mezzo-soprano, will give a degree
recital in Recital Hall in the mu-
sic school bldg.
Friday
8:30 a.m.--The Michigan Union
will host the fifth day of the an-
nual high school Leadership Train-
ing Conference, sponsored by the
Bureau of School Services.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an I
official publication of the Univer- I
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
,esponsibility. Notices should "e sent
in _TYPEWRITTEN form to Room
3584'Administration Building before
2 p.m. of the day preceding publica-
tion, and by 2 p.m. Friday for Satur-
day and Sunday. 1
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 12
Day Calendar
Doctoral Examination for Ira .Harris,
Carmen, Political Science; thesis: "State
and Local Motion Picture Censorship
and Constitutional Acceptance of Su-
preme Court Decision-Making," Wed.,
Aug. 12, 4609 Haven Hall, at 2 p.m.
Chairman, J. E. Kallenbach.i
Doctoral Examination for Beatrice Ed-
son Bowen. Education; thesis: "The
Role of the Teacher in Teaching Lit-
erature in the Elementary School,"
Wed., Aug. 12, 1002 University High
School, at 2 p.m. Chairman, R. S. Fox.
Doctoral Examination for George Ro-
man Chiudzinski, Chemical Engineer-
ing; thesis; "Energy Transfer to Sol-
ids in R. F. Generated Plasmas," Thurs.,
Aug. 13, 3201 East Engrg. Bldg., at 10
a.m. Chairman, R. H. Kadlec.
See Across Campus for other events
of the day and week.
General Notices
Film on Analogue Computer: There
will be a 30-minute film on the ana-
logue computer and its application to
differential equations in Aud. B, Angell
Hall. The first showing will be at 4:15
p.m. and the second at 5:15 p.m. on

Thurs., Aug. 13. The film was made
at the University with 'stars" Profes-
sor Howe of aeronautical engineering
and Professor Kaplan of the mathe-
matics department.
Placemn t
POSITION OPENINGS:
Pinewood Spring Swimming & Tennis
Club, Flushing, Mich.-Athletic Direc-
tor. Male. To manage new swim. & ten-
nis club. BA or less. Phys. Ed. major
des. Exp. summer camp or YMCA.
Swimming proficiency..
Polaroid Corp., Grosse Pointe Park,
Mich.-Sales Rep. Training provided.
Male. Grad. Sales exp. des., not neces-
sary. Available for travel.
For further information, please call
General Div., Bureau of Appointments,
3200 SAB. Ext. 3544.

This U.S. line was implicit inC
the decisions made on relations
with Russia and the Eastern Eu-
ropean countries at the time of
the. Marshall Plan beginning inr
1947.
.President Truman refused to
bar Russia and its satellites from
the European recovery program
and it was, not until Stalin him-
self rejected the program that the
Communist countries could be
countpd out. The action barred
not only Russia but also Poland
and Czechoslovakia, which had
shown great interest in reaping
the benefits of American aid.
Refused
In 1948 when Marshal Tito re-
fused to accept Stalinist domina-
tion and was ejected from the
Cominform, the United States and
other Western powers acclaimed
the first major crack in the Com-
munist monolith as a triumph for
the West and began aiding Tito

11

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