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June 23, 1964 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1964-06-23

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PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, JUNE 23, 1964

PAGE EIGHT THE MICHiGAN flAtLY TUESDAY. JUNE 2L 1984

;1y .i/IV iriiAs V V+ M A/V) 1VV

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AA U-College

Track Fight Flares

SPORTS SHORTS:
Nicklaus Maintains
Tour Money Lead

OFF YOUR DUFFS!
Riskey Announces
Recreation Start

NEW YORK (A)-The Amateur
Athletic Union turned thumbs
dawn yesterday on an NCAA pro-
posal to change the format for
selection of the U.S. track and
field team that will compete
against a Russian squad in Los
Angeles July 25-26.
"I don't go along with their
thinking at all," said J. B. (Cap)
Haralson of Bakersfield, Calif.,
chairman of the AAU Track and
Field Committee.
"First of all," he said, "it was
announced last year-and it has
always been the standard pro-
cedure since we started the com-
petition with the Soviet Union-
that we pick the team from the
national AAU championships.
"The Russian meet is an AAU
project and has nothing to do
with the Olympic Trials. So why
should we use an entirely dif-
ferent meet for our undertakings."
His statement came in a reply
to a resolution passed by the
NCAI Track Coaches Association
last weekend that the U.S. team
for the meet with Russia should
be selected on the basis of the
Olympic Trials scheduled July 3-4,

instead of this weekend's national
AAUchampionships.
The resolution was passed at
an NCAA coaches group meeting
held in connection with the NCAA
track and field championships at
the University of Oregon.
The AAU championsnips, which
has drawn a field of 529 entries
so far, are scheduled at Rutgers
University at New Brunswick, N.J.,
Saturday and Sunday.

"I hate to see a problem like the recently crowned NCAA cham-

this crop up at such a date,"
Haralson said. "Actually, thereI
should be no trouble. Things
should work out smoothly if every-
body followed the schedule an-
nounced quite a while ago."
All but two defending champions
have filed entries for the AAU
championships, and all but six of

pions.
The AAU champions who will
not defend are Pat Clohessy of
the Texas Olympic Club at 5,000
meters, who has returned to his
native Australfa, and Brian Stern-
berg in the pole vault. Sternberg
is still partially paralyzed from
injuries received in a trampoline
accident.

MAJOR LEAGUE ROUNDUP:
Yankees Take Tenth from White Sox

.

CHICAGO ()-The New YorkV
Yankees escaped a three-run
ninth inning uprising and defeated
Chicago 6-5 last night for their
10th victory without a defeat over
the White Sox this season.
The victory gave the American
League leading Yankees a five-
game winning streak and a one-
half game lead over idle Balti-
more.
Steven Hamilton scattered six
hits through eight innings for

I

1

i1

DIAMONDS WAT
HALLERIS
9ewe/eri
TO THE STUDENTS OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
106 Years: 1858 to 196
We welcome the Old Students and
invite the New Students to our store,
located just North of Main Campus.
717 N. University - near Hill Auditor
COLLEGE JEWELRY
JEWELRY WATCH REPAI

CHES

New York, then gave way to re-
liever Hal Reniff in the ninth.
The White Sox promptly loadeds
the bases with none out on singles
by Ron Hansen and Tom McCraw
and a walk to pinch hitter Gene
Stephens. An infield singled by
pinch hitter J. C. Martin scored
one run and brought on reliever
Bill Stafford.
Two more runs were scored as
Don Buford and Floyd Robinson
hit into force outs. But Stafford
then threw out Joe Cunningham
for the game-ending out.
The Yankees scored a run in
the eighth that turned out to be
the winning tally. Hamilton walk-
ed, went to third on a double by
Phil Linz and scored on a sacrifice
fly by Roger Maris.
Atones
CINCINNATI (A)-Willie Mc-
Covey, who made a two-run error
in the fifth inning, smashed a
grand slam homer in the sixth,
leading San Francisco to a 6-2
victory over Cincinnati last night.
McCovey connected off John
Tsitouris, who hadn't allowed a
hit until that inning. Chuck Hil-
ler's pinch single with none out
was the first hit off the Reds'
right-hander.

Jose Pagan scored the Giants'
first run after reaching first on
Pete Rose's error. He went to
second on Hiller's hit and came
home on a single by Jesus Alou.
After Hal Lanier sacrificed, Willie
Mays was walked purposely. Mc-
Covey then connected.
* *
Long Ball Fails
MILWAUKEE (P)-Dick Tra-
cewski drove in four runs last
night as the Los Angeles Dodgers
outlasted Milwaukee 10-9 despite
five home runs by the Braves.
The loss was the seventh
straight for the Braves and came
only hours after Manager Bobby
Bragan received a new contract
extending through the 1965 season.
Tracewski singled home the
final two runs in the Dodgers'
six-run uprising in the seventh
inning, then knocked in what
proved to be the winning run in
the ninth.
Frank Howard led off the ninth
by reaching first base on a wild
throw by Mike de la Hoz. Lee
Walls ran for Howard and was
forced by John Roseboro. Rose-
boro advanced to second on Nate
Oliver's single and scored on a
single by Tracewski.$

By The Associated Press
DUNEDIN, Fla.-Jack Nicklaus
continues to pace pro golfers with
winnings of $51,426 to date this
year, the Professional Golfers As-
sociation said yesterday.
Hard on his heels was Arnold
Palmer with $49,651 followed by
Bill Casper Jr., with $49,229.
Ken Venturi, the new U.S. Open
champion, is No. 7 in the list of
winners with a total of $30,879.
He picked up $17,000 for his Open
victory Saturday.
Casper added $5,000 for his
fourth place finish in the Open,
Palmer $3,750 for fifth and Nick-
laus, well down the list, won $475.
Tony Lema is fourth in the
winners' list with $40,561, fol-
lowed by Mike Souchak $34,453,
Tommy Jacobs $32,524, Mason
Randolph $30,770, Gary Player
$30,377 and Juan Rodriguez $27,-
671.
Major League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
New York 38 23 .6*23 -
Baltimore 39 25 .609
Chicago 34 26 .566 3a
x-Minnesota 33 31 .516 6%2
x-Cleveland 30 30 .500 7Y/
Boston 32 34 .485 82
Detroit 28 33 .459 10
x-Los Angeles 29 37 .439 11%
x-Washington 29 39 .426 12Y2
Kansas City 25 39 .391 141;
x-Played night games.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
New Y ork 6, Chicago 5
Cleveland at Minnesota (ic)
Washington at Los Angeles (inc)
TODAY'S GAMES
Detroit at Kansas City (t-n, TV)
,Boston at Chicago (n)
New York at Baltimore (n)
Washington at Los Angeles (n)
Cleveland at Minnescota (n)
NATIONAL LEAGUE

Olympic Coach Named
NASHVILLE, Tenn.-Ed Tem-
ple of Tennessee State University
said yesterday he has been named
head coach of the U.S. women's
track team that will compete in
the Tokyo Olympics in October.
Temple coached the U.S. team
in the 1960 Rome Olympics, where
one of his students, Wilma Ru-
dolph, won three gold medals in
the sprints.
"At first I was reluctant to ac-
cept, thinking the honor should go
to someone else," Temple said,
"but this is another great honor
for me. It's always a great honor
to represent your country."
Cheops and Cassius
CAIRO - Heavyweight Cham-
pion Cassius Clay said yesterday
he is flying home Tuesday.
Clay praised the Egyptian au-
thorities for the "generous wel-
come they accorded me."
He is taking with him as a
souvenir a present from the Egyp-
tian government-a two ton block
of limestone which he selected
from among the huge blocks of the
Pyramid of the Pharoah Cheops.

With the start of the summer
semester yesterday Earl Riskey,
director of physical education for
men, announced a comprehensive
program of summer recreation for
Michigan's students and faculty.
Leading the list of activities
Riskey has planned for the sum-
mer is a softball league. "I'm
MONEY!
The summer softball league
needs umpires. Anyone interest-
ed in earning a little extra
spending money by working
from one to four nights a week
as an umpire should get in
contact with the IM Bldg office
this week.
anxious to get the word out that
we want entries for our softball
league," he said.
The games will be played at
6:30 p.m. Monday through Thurs-
day depending on which night
the team wants to play. Entries
of teams numbering from 10 to 12
men should be in the Intramural
Bldg. office by Thursday night.
If you are not able to form a team

and still want to play softball
contact the IM Bldg. office and
you will be put on teams.
Besides the softball league Ris-
key is also interested in forming
a seven week tournament in ten-
nis, golf, paddle ball, hand ball
and squash. Persons interested in
theseaactivities should also get in
contact with the IM office. There
are no entry fees for either the
softball league or the various
tournaments and trophies will be
awarded to the champions.
Riskey also announced that the
IM building will be open for gen-
eral use to those who have paid a
$2 locker and towel fee from 8 a.m.
until 7 p.m. The pool will be open
from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. 'every
evening Monday through Friday,
In addition the pool will be re-
served for faculty use only 11:50
a.m. to 1 p.m. during the week.
A swimming program for the sons
of faculty members will be held
The popular coed recreation
night for men and women stu-
dents and faculty will be held from
7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. every Wednes-
day under the direction of Dick
Pitcher.

THE OLD GRADS KNOW
- STARTS AT
MOE'S
If YOU Need y hjLEquipht0!t

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rium
RING

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Materials of all cotton, cotton and dacron, and
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rom 50 to 1O0
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ATTENTION STUDENTS!
FOR YOUR ROOMS:
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Shoppers, Mugs, Trays, and
many other items.
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Philadelphia
San Francisco
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Chicago
St. Louis
Houston
Los Angeles
Milwaukee
New York

W
38
38
34
33
30
32
32
32
30
20

L
23
26
29
29
30
33
34
33
35
47

Pct. GB
.623 --
.595 11
.559 5
.532 5/
.500 7%
.492 8
.485 8
.492 8
.462 10
.299 21

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
San Francisco 6, Cincinnati 2
Los Angeles 10, Milwaukee 9
Only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
Chicago at Philadelphia (t-n)
San Francisco at Cincinnati (t-n)
Pittsburgh at New York (n)
Houston at St. Louis (n)
Los Angeles at Milwaukee (n)

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