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April 18, 1969 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-04-18

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Page Ten
I"
Listen to this tale of romanceS
Tale of Indian warriors bold-
In the early morn of green leaves
Came they forth, the stoics valiant;
Forth they romped to paleface wigwam
Wigwam one of friendly great chief,
Came they forth to take their token,
Then to the mighty oak of Tappan
Dashed the screaming, yelling .redmen;
To the tree of Indian legend
Where the white men pale and trembling
Stood around the mighty oak tree
Warriors choice of paleface nation
Choice of tribe to run the gauntlet.
Down the warriors, painted demons
Swooped and caught their prey like eagles
Loud the war cry stirred the stillness
As they seized their hapless captives
Forth they bore them to their wigwam
There to torture at their pleasure.
There they are around the glowing bonf ires
Heard the words of mighty wisdom,
Smoked the pipe of peace and f riendsh i p.
Thus there came to Michigamua.. .
JUAN BELLO J. REID KLEIN
JOEL BLOCK GEORGE LADNER
RICHARD BORENSTEIN JAMES MANDICH
GEORGE BRISTOL GATES MOSS
GARVIE CRAW THOMAS MOURY
THOMAS CURTIS # BERNARD PASHAK
ALBERT ERSKINE DAVID PERIN
JON HAINLINE RONALD RAPPER
LUCIUS HUDSON IRA RUSSELL
GEORGE HUNTZICKER PHILIP SEYMOUR
GARY KINKEAD WALLIS STROMBERG

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, April 18, 1969

Backs strong* point for

Wolverine grid defense

A

By ELLIOTT BERRY
The Hula hoop, white socks, the
campus liberal, and now you can
add the shut-out defense to the
ong list of the once loved but pre-
sently defunct crazes.
"There's no college team around
that is going to get a lot of shut-

outs anymore," noted Michigan
head football coach, 'Bo' Schem-
bechler. "there are so many of-
fenses these days and coaches are
putting most' of the real versatile
athletes into their offenses."
All is not grim for the Wolver-
ines grid mentor, who admittedly
stresses defense over offense. In
fact, if there are any teams in the
Big Ten who have a chance of re-,
versing the trend toward the high-
scoring freewheeling offense, Sch-
embechler and his Wolverines
have to be among the top candi-
dates for the job.
Schembechler coached o n e of
the few teams in the nation to
yield less than 10 points per game
at Miami (O.) and he has insti-
tnted sweeping changes in t h e
Michigan defense this spring.
"Because of the many changes
brought by the new coaches some
of the veterans have progressed
somewhat slower than usual, but
it's just a matter of a little hesi-
tation which will be overcome
when they become thoroughly fa-
miliar with the system," explain-
ed Schembechler"
One of the major changes in
the defensive alignment will be
the initiation of a roverback, a po-
sition used successfully by many
other teams in which one member
of the secondary is allowed great
freedom to float with the- play.

glowingly, "The kid loves to hit."
The most serious problem fac-
ing the defense right now is at
the tackle positions. Letterman
Dan Parks has been out for much
of spring practice with a bad ank-
le and is well behind schedule.
End Pete Newell has been mov-
ed over to help out at tackle and
letterman Dick McCoy has also
seen plenty of action there thisI
spring.I

Sophomore Fred Grambeau has iors Marty Huff and Ed Moore,
also exhibited some savvy at the one of whom will be calling the
tackle position, but as of today as defensive signals when the season
far as Schembechler is concerned, opens in September. C.urrently
"We're not getting the play there Huff is doing the honors but bot h
that we are going to need." are ready and able.
Moving away from the tackles Youth certainly has to be the
however there is little for even outstanding feature of the line-
Schembechler to be pessimistic backers as behind the two starting
about. Ends Phil Seymour a n d juniors are sophomores Dana Coin
Cecil Pryor were both solid per- and Mike Taylor.
formers last season and have been The most promising feature of
hsharp in spring drills.-f h th b th

other top-flight defensive b a c k.
Schembechler is enthused with
both Healy and Pierson because
of their ability to hit.
Quly one thing really concerns
Schembechier about the second-
ary. "When you play backs the
size of ours anything can happen,"
he cautions, "and we don't have
much. depth there."
Because of the nature of spring
practice it is hard to determine a

At t h e middle guard position,
junior Henry Hill returns and be-
hind him is Al Francis who has
also been impressive. Schembech-
ler emphasizes that, "A good de-
fense must be solid up the middle
with real sharp end play." It looks
like he may have both.
Backing up the line will be jun-

iense asL o Le uie ecoii rI e a 1 eaaer e. Treiore S em-
dary. A c e interception specialist bechler has made it his policy to
Tom Curtis certainly ranks as one wait until the fall to pick a cap-
of the best defensive backs in the tain.
nation. "He has such great ball Fortunately for Wolverine grid
sense," notes Schembechler, "he fans Schembechler has a lot of
gets a jump on the b a 11 like a talent f r o m. which to choose a
great centerfielder." captain and around which to build
Along with Curtis are B r i a n a crack defensive unit. It may ev-
Healy, a less heralded but proven en bring back some of that old
performer, and Barry Pierson, an- fashioned shut-out defense.

1 cindermen approach stride;
Prepare for upcoming relays

4

Phil Seymour
VINS de FRANCE
ANNUAL GROUP FLIGHT
DETROIT-PARIS
and return

The two key elements w h i c h
make a good roverback, are the
ability to hit, and the intuitive
-.;.sense to read out a play. Schem-
bechler thinks he has found the
man for the job in sophomore Tom
Darden of whom the coach says

Tom Curis

e;1i.

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JUNE 16-JULY 14
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For information call
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after 7, 663-3969

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III

DON'T PACK
I F YOU'RE CO'MING'I

By ERIC SIEGEL
After his armies had stormed
through the Georgia countryside,
emerging battle-scarred and com-
bat weary, General Sherman was
led to remark philosophically,
"War is hell!"
It was, to say the least, an un-
derstatement.
After his track team had storm-
ed down the Ferry Field Freeway,
emerging triumphant and eager
for battle, Assistant Coach Ken
Burnley was led to remark jubil-
antly, "We're starting to look like
a track team!"
This, too, was an understate-
ment.
In their first two confrontations
of the outdoor season - at Lex-
ington two weeks ago and 1 as t
weekend in Ann Arbor - the
Wolverine cindermen were v e r y
impressive, wasting no time in
opening up with their rapid-fire
artillery.
In their Lexington opener, the
Wolverines placed an entry among
the top five in seven events while
the Ann Arbor outing netted the
thinclads six firsts, an equal num-
ber of seconds, and seven third
place finishes.
After being in the thick of the
battle at Lexington and complete-
ly blasting their opponents off the
track in Ann Arbor, the Wolver-
ine thinclads will have the op-
portunity for some more target
practice in the next two weekends,
with successive forays at the Ohio
State Relays in Columbus and the
Penn Relays in the city of Bro-
therly Love.
The Wolverines will have more
than ample competition in these

dred at the Ann Arbor Relays,
crossing the tape ahead of Mich-
igan's Gene Brown and Sol Es-
pie, who registered respective se-
cond and third place finishes.
The Penn Relays will feature a
host of formidable sprinters. Vil-
lanova has Olympic sprinters Lar-
ry James, Irv Hall and Frank
Murphy to help them defend their
five relay championships, w h i l e
Florida A&M, who has won the
440 relay the past four years, once
again has a speedy foursome en-
tered. Richard Flowers, the Uni-
versity of Tennessee star, will al-
so compete.
But even against this formidable
competition, the Wolverine sprint-
men should do well. In addition to
Espie and Brown in the 100, Mich-
igan presents a strong front in the
440 relay. The Wolverine quarter-
mile quartet grabbed off first
place in the Ann Arbor Relays,
with a 41.7 clocking, and they
seem to get better every time they
step on the track.
The Wolverines also have con-
siderable ammunition in the sprint
medly and the mile relay, which
includes standouts such as Lor-
enzo Montgomery, Leon Grund-
stein, and Paul Armstrong.

BACK !

Ira Russel

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WITH US FREE
Pay For Your Dry Cleaning
When You Come Back

two relays, with 24 teams, includ-
ing Indiana, the second-place fin-
isher in the Big Ten Indoor
Championships this winter, and
Michigan State, fourth in the con-
ference in the indoor champion-
ships, slated to run in Ohio.
At the Penn Relays, Michigan
will be fighting among 123 bat-

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The total
distinction of

740 Packard

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batants, with home-town favorite Midlam, who has a second and a
Villanova, who finished second be- first place finish to his credit
hind Kansas in the NCAA Indoor after his first two outdoor meets,
Championships and boasts four can lead the charge in any field.
Olvmans on their squad. expect-

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9College WorkStd Progra'm Announce eni
* FULLTIME SUMMER JOBS (June-August 1969)
WITH THE NEW YORK AND DETROIT URBAN CORPS
'income plus involvement in the pproblems of the American City'
* AN APPLICANT MUST BE:
1. A citizen or permanent resident of the United States
2. A student at the University of Michigan with continuing full time enrollment in the '69-'70
academic year (or accepted for such enrollment)
3. Able to demonstrate financial need (through a financial aid application) for eligibility-
certification and separate application to the Urban Corps program.
* INTERESTED STUDENTS MAY ATTEND ONE OF THE FOLLOWING
INFORMATIONAL MEETINGS:

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Office of Financial Aids

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' d to lead the field.
These two upcoming meets pro-
mise to put Michigan's sprint
men, whose efforts have been one
of the more pleasant surprises for
thinclads in this young season, to
the test.
The Hoosiers have a potent pair
of sophomore speedsters in Mike
Goodrich and Larry Highbaugh.
Goodrich and Highbaugh finished
one-two in the 100 yard dash at
Lexington, and also led Hoosier
quartets to first place finishes in
the 440 and 880 relays.
In addition to the hustling Hoos-
iers, Michigan State's freshman
Herb Washington is slated to com-
pete in Ohio. Washington ran
away with the crown in the hun-

The middle distances - long
a veritable arsenal of Wolverine
track strength - should be even
stronger in the upcoming meets
with the return of Olympian Ron
Kutschinski, who has been side-
lined with a pulled leg muscle.
And Michigan's entries in the
field events appear to be J u s t
hitting their stride on the outdoor
turf. Long-jumper Ira Russel
leaped close to 24' last weekend,
high-jumper Gary Knickerbock-
er cleared 6'8", and freshman
polevaulter Larry Wolfe has rock-
eted over 16'.
As John Paul Jones said, in
something less than an under-
statement, "We have not yet be-
gun to fight."

I

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Watch for
Grand Opening of
4THE ALTERNATIVE
Student-Faculty Co-op Coffee House
1st WEEK-SPRING TERM
Michigan Union

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Tbursday,17 April 1969
4:00 P.M. 3516 SAB'

Monday, 21 April
4:00 P.M., 7:15 P.M.

1969
3511 SAB

OR CONTACT THE OFFICE OF FINANCIAL AIDS
2011 Student Activities Bldg.-Tel. 763-2151

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IFC -PAN-HEL

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Is Proud To Announce

CENTRAL COMMITTEE
For A
KICK-OFF WEEKEND, FALL 1969
GENERAL CO-CHAIRMEN-Barb Lowrie, Mel Schwartz

NOw
Save up to
500o
OFF
Clubs-Carts-Bags-
Balls-Shoes-etc.
over 300 sets of Clubs
over 400 Golf Bags
over 75 Golf Carts
over 250 pairs of
GOLF SHOES

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unique coloration of grey and
lavender, $175.00
Pierre Cardin Flnired Rottnm

SPECIAL EVENTS-Barb Allen, John Weiner 1-
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