100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 18, 1969 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-04-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, April 18, 1969

I I I I

can't make

In Ann Arbor, the term "sum-
mertime blues" refers to that
deadened feeling accompanying
the uneventful lag between May
andl September. Once the mov-
ies are seen, parties have been
frequented, and friends have
left, Ann Arbor has few means
of breaking a seemingly endless
summer.
This year, however, summer-
time blues will be referring to
an event that hopefully will
dispell all the negative conno-
tations of that old term. For
several University students have
decided to make Ann Arbor the
center of the "first large-scale
convention of blues musicians
in this country" and they have
been busily laying the ground
work for that event.
So far, backers of the Festival
have asked blues musicians from
Paul Butterfield to Clifton Che-,
nier (the onlyaccordian play-
ing Creole singer) to participate
in the first Ann Arbor blues
festival, a three day event of
concerts and workships sched-
uled to begin August 1.
"We can only allude to offers,
but can't make any definite
statements; however, we're pret-
ty optimistic that almost every-
one we've asked will be com-
ing," says Blues Festival chair-
man, Gary Gordon.
The proposed list of perform-
ers i n c 1 u d e s representatives
from the major branches of the
blues - urban, rural and "the
older style." Members of the
committee have been in contact
with such performers as Muddy
Waters, B. B. King, Howlin'
Wolf, James Cotton, John Lee
Hooker, Lightin' Hopkins, and
Roosevelt Sykes. "We've asked
just about anyone that we can
think of," Gordon says.
"In fact, members of our en-
tertainment committee have
been making side trips to Chi-
cago to scout out new talent to
balance out the program," Gor-

tto N
don adds. A recent "side trip"
resulted in a contract with
Luther Allison's Chicago Blues
Band for a free concert this
Monday.
With a fairly generous budget
provided by the two supporting
organizations, UAC and Canter-
bury House, Festival committee
members feel they can finance
nearly everyone they've asked.
"You have to realize that good
blues musicians often aren't
that expensive," Gordon says.
Paul Butterfield, who charges
$4,000 a concert remains the
most expensive performer. And
even this top salary remains
somewhat modest when com-
pared to the pricetags on many
performers brought in by UAC
-$20,000 for the recent Aretha
Franklin concert, for example.
Four major concerts and sev-
eral smaller workshops have
been scheduled for the three
day event. Already planned are
guitar and blues drummers
workshops and a "history of the
Blues" seminar with Muddy,
Waters.
"We hope to submerge Ann
Arbor in a totally musical at-
mosphere for the three festival
days," boasts Bert Stactton of
the festival committee.
Not only is the festival solely
one of entertainment; Gordon
says, but its also a "cultural
thing" which should teach the
background and origin of. the
blues. And the presence of a
large audience attracted by big
name performers provides the
support for many smaller names
that otherwise couldn't appear.
The idea for the festival came
about early this year when sev-
eral UAC members were trying
to find some type of concert to
provide summer entertainment.
The blues festival suggestion
came up "but this was in name
only," Gordon says.
To see if there would be

wport
en ugh support for this idea,
UAC advertised it would be ac-
cepting petitions for festival
committee members. P r e t t y
soon a committee dedicated to
"establishing an aesthetic fes-
tival similar to Newport," as
Stactton terms it began organ-
izing.
Besides lining up perform-
ers and finding a location for
the festival, committee members
have begun organizing "a na-
tionwilde publicity campaign."
This recently paid off when
Billboard, a national magazine
of records and music recently
included a feature story on the
festival. "Even Newsweek ap-
pears interested in a write up,"
Stactton says.
Although, festival committee
members expect to draw the
largest audience from the Ann
Arbor area, they have neverthe-
less contracted to use South
Quad for out-of-state visitors
Ferry Field and Burns Park
have been discussed as locations
for Festival field. Once the final
list of performers is drawn up,
committee . members plan to
start taking mail orders for tick-
ets. "Then we'll know how much
to charge," a Festival commit-'
tee man said.
L. W.

Engieers
winessa
coopeition
Winners of the annual Cooley
essay contest for engineering stu-
dents were announced yesterday.
Dennis Daly, '69E, won first
prize of $1,000. Second prize of
$500 was awarded to Darrel Pet-
ers. '71E. James Schauer, '70E,
won the third prize of $300.
This year's topic for' the con-
test was "Technological progress:
Has it led us to more satisfying
lives?"
Judges for the competition were
Profs. Dwight Stevenson and Peter
Klaver of the engineering English
department and Prof. Donald H.
Gray of the civil engineering de-
partment.
Litter doesn't throw
itself away; litter
doesn't just happen.
People cause it-and'
t only people can prevent
it. "People" means you.
Keep America Beautiful.
'advertising contributed
Jfor the public good

CINEM A BUILD
THURSDAY and FRIDAY
dir. JOHN HUSTON, 1961
written by ARTHUR MILLER
Marilyn Monroe-Clark Gable
7 & 9 ARCHITECTURE
75c
662-8871 AUDITORIUM

At

1

605

E. William 769-
SABOTEUR
ALFRED HITCHCOCK, dir.
ROBERT CUMMINGS, PRISCILLA LANE

1593

The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students of the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second'
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michi-
gan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $9 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
DANIEL OKRENT '
nvites!
his friends
to a good-bye
Ann Arbor party
TONIGHT,
350 Thompson, No. 218,
at 10 o'clock
"I want both of you to
~D
~tiP
(i

THE FUNNIEST
WESTERN
SATIRE IN AGES
-FUNNIER THAN
"CAT BALLOU"
PURE "CAMP"

Program Information: 2-6264

3RD WEEK

OF
SIDE-SPLITTING
LAUGHS

'ANN ARBOR
BLUES FESTIVAL
THE PREVIEW
LUTHER ALLISON
CHICAGO BLUES BAND
FREE
UNION BALLROOM
MONDAY, APRIL21 8 P.M.-12 P.M.
Sponsored by
and CANTERBURY HOUSE

gripping melodrama revolving around Nazi sabo-
teurs, climaxed by a classic Hitchcock chase through
New York
THURS., APRIL 17 8:00, 10:00 P.M.
FRI., SAT.,APRIL 18, 19 10:00 P.M., 1:00 A.M.,
SUN., APRIL 20 3:00 P.M.
.75 downstairs

CHEROKEE PRODUCTIONS Presents

LSEE THE
WEST'S
GREATEST
Put-Down Artist
In Action!
ALSO Surfing Classic
"WET & WILD"
SHOWS AT 1,3, 5, 7, 9
Feature 20 Minutes Later

I

-ry

.a

TONIGHT and SATURDAY

PAT
REYNOLDS

1421 Hill St.
8:30 P.M:

co-starring HARRY MORGAN JACK ELAM
Written and Produced by WILLIAM BOWERS Directed by BURT KENNEDY
Suggested For GENERAL Audiences C LO InrtuArt st
by.DeLuxe I sa'nrnc.Corora a.,

I!

li

Andy Warhol
won't be eligible to enter the
FALL CREATIVE ARTS
STUDENT|FILM FESTIVAL

AND
DAVE
SIGLIN
CONTEMPORARY
BALLADS
SEA SHANTIES
LOVE SONGS
CHILDREN'S SONGS
LEADBELLY
STORY SONGS

DIAL 5-6290

"An absolutely must see! A truly
memorable, extraordinary filmrI"
-Joseph Gelmis, Newsday,

AUTO HARP
12 STRING
6 STRING
DOBRO

*I

"BREATHTAKING !"
-New York Times

- **0-

Maybe your film will have a chance-Plan
now to enter-Cash awards

Ikr

SAT. KITE LATE-
AFTER HOURS
_50c__-

III

Information at UAC offices
2nd floor Union, 3rd floor League
NATIONAL GENERAL CORPRTION . Feature Times
Held Over FOX EASTER~N THEATRES-MnthuF.
HEtdOver g gm
2nd F X ILL MoE k30-9Fri
eek 375 No. MAPLE RD.-7694300 Saturday-Sundav
Week1:00-3:45-
6:30-9:15
These Nazis
aren't for real!
They are Allied agents
who must win
World War 11

Order Your Daily Now-
Phone 764-0558

A superb film They hunted each other as enemies...
-True Magazine
they tormented each other as savages...
they faced each other as men!
MARVIN
LMIRING

f

From
Sweden..
the
classic
female
concept

,1

I

JERY GOS an NCHOAS EMTROLE
a

'i 4 -
IN THE
'PACIIC

E

''

-. -'->: . ...

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan