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April 17, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-04-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

r I

CO-ED FLOOR?
Men and Women in
Alternating Rooms on
the Same Corridor
CALL 764-0910 or 764-0912
ANYTIME

NEWS PHONE
BUSINESS PHOT%
Thursday, April 17, 1969
the

: 764-0332
NE: 764-0554

94P

Sfrii3an

~aty

second front page

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

a

tUos.

search

news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

es for
North

APRIL 18-19
SINDERIELLA ANDk THE
GOLDEN BRA
"Filled with infinite profundity"
-The Board

i

Fri., Sat., 7-9 P.M.

Aud. A, Angell

75c

SPECIAL 11:00 SHOWINGS
both Fri. and Sat. nights
SHANGHAI EXPRESS
with MARLENE DI ETRICH
directed by Von Sternberg
COWBOY FESTIVAL'
during study days
MONDAY, APRIL 21
MY PAL TRIGGER
Roy Rogers, Dale Evans, Gabby Hayes
TUESDAY, APRIL 22
THE PROFESSIONALS
Lee Marvin, Claudia Cardinale,
Burt Lancaster, Jack Palance
All showings in the festival will
be preceded by a live performance
by the
LEAVES, OFGRASS

CZECHOSLOVAKIA'S LEADERS, in a sharp setback for re-
formers, gave a clean bill of health to 10 prominent pro-Moscow
Czechs.
The Czechoslovak Communist Party' Supreme Executive Com-:
mittee said the 10, who supported the Russian invasion last August,
had been "unjustly slandered." Without naming individuals, the com-
mittee laid the blame to anti-Moscow reformers.
In a demonstration of support for the reformers, more than 2,000
students at Prague's Agricultural College struck classes. A procla-
mation issued by the students condemned government action against
anti-Soviet protests and the increase in Soviet occupation troops.
DEMOCRATIC AND REPUBLICAN CONGRESSMEN yester-
day blasted President Nixon's decision to shut 59 Job Corps cen-
ters.
Carl D. Perkins (D-Ky.) introduced a bill that would take away
presidential authority to make changes in the Job Corps and other
anti-poverty programs for five years-.
Guy Vander Jagt (R-Mich.) accused the administration of a
"meataxe" approach in shutting down centers doing valuable conser-
vation work.
THE PENTAGON issued the lowest draft call of the year yes-
terday.
The Defense Department asked the Selective Service System to
draft 25,900 men in June. A total of 23,900 will be inducted into the
Army with the remaining 2000 going to the Marines.
The Pentagon also said voluntary enlistments by physicians will
allow a reduction of almost one half of the planned inductions of
medical men.
A WELFARE MOTHER suggested to a U.S. Senate hunger
committee yesterday that the federal government subsidize the
poor.
Testifying at a hearing in Washington, Mrs. Marty Green said
if the federal government can subsidize Sen. James Eastlang (D-Miss)
not to produce crops, "Why can't the poor be subsidized not to produce
hunger?"
A group of mothers urged free school lunches for poor children
and changes in welfare rules which force husbands to leave families,
* *-*
JAMES EARL RAY will be given the chance to plead for a
new trial May 26 it was announced today.,
Judge Arthur Faquin set May 26 to hear a motion from the con-
fessed slayer of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. fqr a new trial. Ray
pleaded guilty to the killing on March 10 but later claimed he had'
been pressured into doing so.
THE JURY trying Sirhan Sirhan returned to court yesterday
to ask about instructions regarding a second degree murder ver-
diet.
In its third day of deliberation, the jury asked Judge Herbert
Walker to review his instructions about sentencing when the defen-
dant has a diminished mental capacity. The judge reread several par-
agraphs of his Monday charge and explained them.

dow ned

by

Korea
'Pentagon
denies spy.
allegations
WASHINGTON (*-The De-
fense Department said yesterday
intensive search operations are
continuing but concern has deep-
ened for the lives of 31 men aboard
a Navy plane shot down by North
IKorean fighters.,
The Pentagon confirmed, after
two days of studying the evidence,
that the plane, an unarmed, pro-
peller driven EC 121 electronics
intelligence craft, was shot down
Monday over the Sea of Japan.
"There is no word of any sur-
vivors," the Pentagon statement
said. But it added: "The search
continues."
So far the hunters have found
plane parts and a piece of para-
chute. The U.S. destroyer Dale
picked up two pieces of aircraft
fuselage with shrapnel holes in
them, along with a flare and the
piece of parachute, the Pentagon
said yesterday.
Earlier, one of the two Soviet
destroyer-type ships assisting at
the scene that looked from the air
like a wheel and aircraft parts.
President Nixon met for an hour
with the National Security Council
and later conferred for an hour
and a half with Secretary of State
William P. Rogers, Secretary of
Defense Melvin R. Laird, Gen.
Earle G. Wheeler, chairman of the
Joint Chiefs ofgStaff, and Dr.
Henry A. Kissinger, Nixon's na-
tional security adviser.
The Pentagon's chief spokes-
man, Daniel Z. Henkin, announced
that "all evidence now available
to us, including: North Korean
claims and debris sightings, leads
us to believe that the aircraft was
shot down by North Korean air-
craft."
Henkin said the electronics-
jammed plane never violated
North Korean airspace.
The Pentagon said the plane .
was not conducting any mission
for the Central Intelligence Agen-
cy or the National Security Agen-
cy. It also, denied the EC121's
mission was a substitute for
Pueblo-type operations and said
the flights were not stepped up
after the Navy intelligence ship
was seized in January, 1968.

New 'Ensian staff

The new senior staff of the Michiganensian includes, top row, left 'to right: Jane Hoffman, man-
aging editor; Shirley Goldsmith, personnel manager; Cathy Schallhorn, design manager. Bottom
row, left to right: Dennis Zeisler, business manager; Sally Watson, editor; Richard Lee, photo
editor. Not pictured is Joey Porcelli, copy editor. -
HEART ATTACK:
Judge James Breakey dies

HELD OVER
2nd WEEK

NATIONAL GENERAL CORPORATION
FOX EASTERN THEATRES
FO.AVILL6E
375 No. MAPLE PD. 769.1300

Mon. thru Fri.
6:30-9:15
Sot.-Surf.
1:00-3:45-
6:30-9:15
cture starring
[Mary Ure
Mq~trocolor 0 maw

Judge James R. Breakey, Jr.,
one of Michigan's most respect-
ed jurists, died early yesterday
of a heart attack.
A Washtenaw County Circuit
Court judge for 24 years, Judge
Breakey introduced many in-
novations in judicial procedure
for which he was nationally
known.
Judge Breakey, 69, had re-
turned home from University
Hospital April 9 to complete his
recovery from a heart attack
suffered Feb. 4 in his office.
Circuit Court Judges William
F. Ager and John W. Conlin
announced all county c o ur ts
will be closed through Friday,
the day of a memorial service for
Judge Breakey, except for emer-
gency matters. The C o u n t y
Building will also be closed on

Friday during the memorial ser-
vice.
Judge Breakey was appointed
to the bench by Gov. Harry F.
Kelly on May 29, 1945. He soon
began to introduce new de-
velopments such as a court mar-
riage counselor, automatic pre-
trial procedures, an adult pro-
bation school, night court, and
regular conferences with judges
of lower courts.
Judge Breakey was a pioneer
in the use of educational tele-
vision for legal education. In
1962' he started closed circuit
transmission of court proceed-
ings to the University's 1aw
school, the first time television
was used for this purpose in the
nation.
Judge Breakey also continued
the gambling grand jury that
was operating when he took the

bench and was credited for
keeping the county free of or-
ganized vice.
He was recognized by the state
Supreme Court for his judicial
administration and for his few
reversals by higher courts.
In 1.953 he was president of
the Michigan Judges Associa-
tion and in 1963 he was elected
a fellow of the American Bar
Foundation. He won the Repub-
lican nomination for the State
Supreme Court in 1960 but was
defeated by the incumbent jus-
tice.
A memorial service for Judge
Breakey will be held at 2 p.m.
Friday at the First United Pres-
b terian Church of Ypsilanti.
e family has requested that
memorial contribution be made
to the Portage Trail Council of
the Boy Scouts.

i

MGM presents a Jerry Gersnwin-uiott Kastner pi
Richard Burton- Clint Eastwood
"Where Eagles Dare"

rrl-_----

JXapk

605 E. William

769-1593

1i

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I

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UI

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SABOTEUR
ALFRED HITCHCOCK, dir.
ROBERT CUMMINGS, PRISCILLA LANE

-ENDING TONIGHT-
"Buone Sera
Mrs. Campbell"

STARTING FRIDAY

They hunted each other as enemies...
they tormented each other as savages...
they faced each other as men!
MARVIN
TOSHIRO
MIFUNEu

gripping melodrama revolving around Nazi sabo-
teurs, climaxed by a classic Hitchcock chase through
New York
THURS., APRIL17 8:00, 10:00 P.M.
FRI., SAT., APRIL 18, 19 10:00 P.M.,1:00 A.M..
SUN., APRIL20 3:00 P.M.
.75 downstairs

THE CHESS MATE COFFEE HOUSE
ENTERTAINMENT
after-hours dancing
THE CHESS=MATE COFFEE HOUSE
(no age limit)
IDETROIT, MICHIGAN
Livernois at 6 Mile
Expires May 4, 1969 Tel. 862-1554 #
THE GOOD NEWS
CLIP THIS COUPON AND SAVE
Good for 1 FREE ADMISSION with 1 paid admission
Open till 5 A.M.-Friday & Saturday

I

Eli

"Irreverent, Off Beat, Wacky...
I ENJOYED IT"
-Gordon Beauchamp, Daily

I

t -'l A

/

"I' l,

''4

DNE
OF THE "THE MOS
E S DAZZLIN
A: TEN BEST!" DIRECTORIAL
-Hollis Alpert DEBUT 0f
and Arthur Knight, THE YEA
Saturday Revew TEme MagaI
Thurs.,
rw F r i . , 7 ,
.Photog aph by
N, ~.. TCopyright 1968
Twentieth Century-ox
' s fim Corporation

From

T
lL
IF
R'.
tin

JSweden...
the

classic
female
concept

INTHE

7, 9
9,11j

6

I

I

JERRYCROSS and NICHOLAS DEMETROULES
a~a~

"FREE, TENDER, LIFE-LOVING, CREATIVE AND CONCERNED ABOUT VALUES,
A MILIEU IN WHICH INTER-RACIAL SEXUALITY IS A SIMPLE FACT RATHER
Ini x Ir ~ir~ t.t.

...........

, 1

.,

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