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January 16, 1969 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1969-01-16

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Page Three

Thursday, January 16,,1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, January 16, 1969 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

HOW MANY MORE?:
Losses blunt

........

The
Blues
Confederation
at -The Depot Rouse
ASHLEY, South of West Huron

Viet Cong strength

the-I
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Ser? ice

7

By PETER ARNETT
Second Part
By The Associated Press

9 P. M .-

A.M.

Admission $2.00

SECOND FILM IN
AN INTERNATIONAL
"Ma Against Society
FILM FESTIVAL
VISCONTI'S ITALIAN CLASSIC
WINNER VENICE FILM FESTIVAL
LA TERRA TREMA
(The Earth Will Tremble)
uncut
Friday, Jan. 17

NEWMAN
331 Thompson

The commonplace in the battle sectors
emu players series-
F THE HOUSE
OF
BERNARDA ALBA
-a fiery drama of Spanish women
January 15-19
Quirk Auditorium
For Reservations Call 482-3453
(Weekdays, 12:45-4:30 p.m.)
All Seats Reserved at $1.75
TONIGHT AT
I ALII Aau ftn

How many dead can the Viet
Cong take? The question fas-
cinates American commanders.
By official Vietnamese tabu-
lation, 191,307 of the enemy fell
last year. The real body count
may be less, but there is little
doubt that more than 100,000
died in the streets ofNSaigon.
the back alleys of Da Nang, in
the grounds of the American
Embassy, in fruitless . attacks
on American firebases and un-
der the B52 bomb.
"The North Vietnamese have
literally thrown themselves to
their death," a brigade com-
mander commented. "The war
in 1968 became a much-easier
one for Americans and the Viet-
namese to fight."
By emerging from jungles and
swamps, the main forces gave
up a military superiority that
once promised survival. Attri-
tion became effective, with the
constant loss of small-unit lead-
ership to allied guns, lowering
the general standard of fight-
ing.
'Even so, formidable Viet Cong
forces have again massed along
the borders, possibly with a big-
ger order of battle than during
last Tet, and certainly with new-
er equipment and well trained
recruits.
"They are probably waiting
for the opportune time to hit,"
a senior American officer com-
mnented - an event expected
later this year, launched either
to force home a point after the
peace talks get moving, or
launch full scale war again if
they collapse.
The allied forces are in a
much better pOsition this year
to forestall a renewed Viet Cong
offensive than they were 12
months ago. Seventy per cent
of. theenemy's estimated 150,-
000-man force is North Viet-
namese who do not enjoy the
same degree of penetration into
the Vietnamese establishment
that the local Viet Cong has.
The Viet Cong forces, how-
ever, have proved expert at
seizing local initiative. They are

masters of surprise diversion, and
are imaginative and bold in
executing military strikes. "We
have continually overestimated
the capacity of the enemy, and
have underestimated his imagi-
nation and daring," an Amer-
ican observer commented.mr
Given those qualities, the
Viet Cong forces can in the
event of a renewed offensive,
be expected to break through
the outer line of allied defenses
and plunge to population cen-
ters.
This could tear to shreds the
"accelerated pacification" pro-
gram that began as a land-
grabbing technique b e f o re
Christmas when a permanent
ceasefire was thought possible,
and looks as if it would be the
basis for the 1969 pacification
program.
"Accelerated pacification is
an optical illusion anyway, just
a card to play at the negotiating
table," an American provincial
adviser said.
"We are spread too thin. We
are filling the vacuum, but this
is only valid as long as the en-
emy main forces stay out. If
they come back they'll walk all
over us.
This view may be overly som-
ber, particularly in view of the
proven superiority of allied fire-
power thathas cut down the
Viet Cong and the North Viet-
namese in thousands.
Most authorities in Vietnam,
however, feel that the Commu-
nist-led forces will continue to,
attempt to pound their way into
power if the Paris talks fail to
reach some kind of settlement.
Some Americans now in Viet-
nam would prefer to see t h e
Vietnamese army doing more
and the Americans less if this is
the case.
One American commented, "I
was once one of 17 men who
fought our way off a hill in Ko-
rea. We left 500 Chinese and the
rest of our company dead be-
hind us.
"I realized then that a nation
that places a value on human
life cannot afford to engage in a
war in the Orient. In the Orient,
loss of manpower is important
only as to the time and the man-
ner that replacements can come
in."

THREE SOVIET COSMONAUTS were launched into
space yesterday in an orbit close to that of a comrade
who has been aloft 24 hours.
The launching led to speculation the spacemen would
attempt the world's first crew transfer in orbit. This would
be an important step toward the establishment of space
laboratories. The U.S. has yet to attempt this space feat.
THE SENATE will vote today whether to change Sen-
ate Rule 22, which currently requires a two-thirds ma-
jority of members to shut off a filibuster.
Democratic leader Mike Mansfield said yesterday he
would not vote to sustain Vice President Humphrey's ruling
on Tuesday that a simple majority of the Senate could change
Rule 22. Liberals want to reduce the two-thirds requirement
to three-fifths.
PRESIDENT-ELECT NIXON'S cabinet nominees yes-
terday went under review by the Senate.
William P. Rogers told the Foreign Relations Commis-
sion that as secretary of state he would urge the Saigon
government to proceed with the Paris talks regardless of dis-
agreement over the shape of the negotiating table.
Alaska Gov. Walter J. Hickel, an exponent of rapid indus-
trialization in Alaska, said after his selection as secretary of
the interior he would not be opposed to modifying some
Interior Department regulations in the interest of industrial-
ization. Yesterday he tol4 the Senate Interior Committee he
hopes to work with Congress "in a spirit of constructive co-
operation."
Maurice H. Stans, selected for secretary of commerce,
and David Packard, slated for deputy secretary of defense,
went before the Commerce Committee and the Armed Serv-
ices Committee respectively. Stans' and Packard's hearings
centered on whether they had placed their personal affairs
and finances beyond conflict with their public duties.
THE CARRIER ENTERPRISE reported that all but
one of the 17 men previously missing in the explosion and
fire Tuesday have been accounted for.
This brings the toll to 24 dead, 85 injured and one missing.
An air and sea search is continuing for the one man still
missing.
Fifteen aircraft aboard the 85,000-ton carrier were de-
stroyed in the blaze as the ship conducted a bombing train-
ing exercise 75 miles from Pearl Harbor.
The Navy attributed the initial explosion to a bomb
falling from an airplane landing on the carrier, but later
withdrew this explanation pending an investigation.
* * *
POPE PAUL VI accused his Roman Catholic critics
yesterday of trying to overhaul the Church in what he
called the form of the Protestant Reformation.
It was the first time since the world wide outcry against
his stand on birth control that the Pope has publicly likened
the wave of opposition to his authority to the 16th century
revolt. Many in the Roman Catholic Church consider the
challenge to the papacy brought out by the Pope's ban against
contraception a most serious crisis.
IN WAR ACTION yesterday, U.S. Marines captured
several tunnels on the Batangan Peninsula, seized food
caches and smashed back a Viet Cong attempt to break
out of an allied trap. -
Inland, the rest of the 8,200 U.S. and South Vietnamese
that clamped a cordon around the enemy supply base Mon-
day, ran into only light sniper fire. Two Marines were report-
ed killed and seven wounded. Viet Cong casualties were un-
known.

s

75c

8 P.M.

-

WRITER-IN-RESIDENCE PROGRAM
presents
JERZY KOSINSKI
TODAY
10A.M. on Novelists' workshop at Canterbury
1 P.M. Prof. Ingram's Great Books Class
3 P.M. Hopwood Tea, Hopwood Room,
Angell Hall
4-5:30 P.M. Prof. Welsh's Polish Lit Class
3040 Frieze Bldg.
5:30 P.M. Dinner and Discussion at
Markley Hall
Call for personal or group
appointrments forFriday, Jan. 17-764-7442

Author of "POT:
A handbook of MARIJUANA"
DISCUSSION

1421 Hill St
8:30P.M.

GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe
Fri. Jan. 17, Noon Luncheon 25c 3
PROFESSOR JOSEPH SAX, Law School:
"IN SOLITARY WITNESS'
Fri. Eve. Guild Dinners will start Fri., Jan. 24;
watch for announcement

FRIDAY and SATURDAY

I!;

PAMELA MILES and DAVE JOHNS
Returning by overwhelming popular demandL

Use Daily

Classifieds

Is

"ARISR& EROTICISM"
Cue Magazine N.Y.Times
"THE MOVIE HAS THE CAREFUL TEMPO OF A MINUET,
WHICH COUNTERPOINTS ITS DESPERATE EROTICISM!"
N.Y. Times

F
UNION-LEAGUE
MICH IGRAS
MASS
MEETING

or those of you
who missed

- - "

You can still
sign up for committees
in the '
MICHIGRAS Office
3rd floor League

IL

BRITAIN'S LABOR GOVERNMENT is staking its fu-
ture on measures to curb strikes that are undermining
the" nation's drive toward economic solvency.'
The government initiated measures making secret strike
ballots obligatory to eliminate charges of intimidation such
as have been leveled in some cases of public votes.
A second major change would provide a compulsory cool-
ing off period- 28 days in the case of official union strikes
and 56 days for wildcat action.

"SURELY THIS IS
AMONG THE MOST
EROTIC OF MOVIES!
The movie's artistry
raises the subject
matter to the level
of personality
exploration. THE
EXPERIENCE IS
BIZARRELY
COMPELLINGI 9
Cue Magazine

iiA HIGHLY EROTIC
FILM! IT SHOULD
BECOME A CAUSE
CELEBRE WITH THE
WHATEVER-TURNS-
YOU-ON SET! Glenda
Jackson is really
tremendous!
ENGROSSING!
OFFBEAT AND
DIFFERENT!"
WINS Radio

1.
'I

NATIONAL GENERAL CORPORATION
POX EASTERN TM"hEATE
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375 NO. MAPLE RD.-.7694300

LAST TIMES TODAY
"CANDY" 7:00-9:20

I

..,E

* STARTS TOMORROW *
The Toughest Hellfighter of All!
~JOHN
ROSSJ'
A UNIVERSAL PICTURE'- TECHNICOLOR** PANAVISION'

SNACKS

ENDING TONIGHT

El, .t

Michigan
M. U.

Union
G.

Ii

C

I

MUST IT
kApEN
ONCE
TO EYW

I

BILLIARDS

POCKET POOL

Michigan Union

r6LEAVES NOTHING TO "SEXUAL AND INVECTIVE
THE IMAGINATION! AAND PERFORMANCES OF
GOES TOO FAR!" ELsMEMORABLE QUALITY!"
N.Y. Daily News A BIZARRE MODERN DRAMA OF A MAN AND TWO WOMEN N.Y. Post
LOCKED IN A SENSUAL GAME OF SEX.

I

I

*dowo7
ODskv RWERNER
bARbAMFERRIS
IOVE STORY of
A %d CciRl

MUSKET
A.A. CIVIC THEATER
GILBERT AND SULLIVAN SOCIETY

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