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April 16, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-04-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TONIGHT IS
Your Last Chance

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

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Datit

second front page

Wednesday, April 16, 1969 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

A mw w w - Wp mw w

to come
to the

1 421 Hill St.
8:30 P.M.

Military dictatorship emerging in

8:30 sharp
-4 sets 4-
-50c-

HOOT

FRIDAY and SATURDAY-
PAT REYNOLDS
and DAVE SIGLIN

By WILLIAM L. RYAN
Associated Press News Analysis
As Red China's leaders labor
to get their political house in or-
der they present an astonishing
picture. The rest of the world
may wonder how long such a re-
gime can last. Within a few
years, the Peking leadership's
ranks are bound to suffer a high
mortality rate from nature's toll.
What has been published thus
far about the Chinese Commu-
nist party's ninth congress re-
veals that China is to be ruled
by a small inner circle of elder-
ly men who picture themselves
as the vanguard of a new revo-
lutionary era.
The real story seems to be
one of an emerging military dic-
tatorship leaning heavily on
support from the PLA-People's

Liberation Army. The party as
it existed, before 1966 and the
riotous cultural revolution, is a
thing of the past. Only a hand-
ful - perhaps 25 per cent - of
members and alternates of the
last Central Committee, elected
in 1956, escaped the cultural
revolution purge.
The ranks of the in-between
age group in the leadership
have been more than decimated
by the reckless young Red
Guards under the direction of
the, party ancients.
Lin Piao, a marshal when the
PLA still used such titles and
minister of defense since 1959,
has surrounded himself with a
group of former army officers,
security experts and guerrilla
war veterans to form the core of
the dictatorship. For all prac-

tical purposes, Lin is the present
boss of Red China.
He is extolled in terms sug-
gesting a long glorification cam-
paign in store. He is called "the
brilliant example" and the
"splendid model" of loyalty, to
the thoughts of Mao Tse-tung.
He is Mao's "best pupil and
comrade-in-arms," who heroi-
cally struggled" for many years
against Mao's political foes.
Thus, Mao appears to have
been elevated to Communist
sainthood, and Lin and his
group rule in the name of "Mao
Tse-tung's thoughts."
By comparison with most of
the others in the inner circle,
Lin is a young man at 61. The
saturnine, frail veteran of Chi-
na's civil war has frequently

been reported ailing from a tu-
bercular condition.
At the head of the pecking or-
der, according to this week's
communique from the ninth
congress, comes Mao himself at
the age .of 75. In third place,
ranking after Lin Piao, is Pre-
mier Chou En-Lai, 70. Next is
Chen Po-Ta, who was -in charge
of the cultural revohition. He is
64. Next is Kang Sheng, the
Moscow-trained secret police
expert, 66.
All the inner circle, with only
a few exceptions, are old men.
The circle includes one woman,,
Chiang Ching, Mao's fourth
wife, who is a young 57. But Wu
Fa-hsien, once Peking's ranking
expert on Soviet affairs and a
Chou En-lai protege, is 69. Chu
Teh, the civil war marshal who

once was Lin's boss, is 83; Tung
Pi-Wu, who apparently has
served as interim "president"
since the downfall of Liu Shao-
chi, is 82. Liu Po-cheng, another
former subordinate of Chu Teh,
is 76. Chen Yun, the economist
who has been in and out of the
top echelon during the cultural
revolution and who apparently
is up again, is 69.
The top inner circle seems to
be made up of about 10 persons.
People like Chu Teh, Tung Pi-
wu, Chen Yun and even Lin's
wife, Yeh Chun, fall in a cate-
gory just beneath the top rang.
The inner circle probably will
make up the standing commit-
tee of the next ruling Politburo,
to be named by a new Central
Committee.
This group will rule in the

China
name of "Mao's thinking," im-
posing a long period of austerity
upon the population. The ques-
tion of Mao's mortality thus
must be a major problem for the
emerging regime.
Peking acounts of the ninth
congress report its delegates
shouting "Long live Mao Tse-
Tung."
And well they might. Others
of the ruling inner circle can
pas out of the picture without
causing any particular prob-
lems. But that can hardly be so
in the case of Mao. His figure
has been made so important, so
central to the ruling group's
claim to power, that the leaders
must fear the day they are ob-
liged to tell the nation of 700
million that the 'ld man is gone.

Gina
L ollobrigida
Shelley Winters
Peter Lawford
Jelly Savalas
Phil Silvers
in
the Modern Comedy
s s
Mrs

r-

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

[

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DIAL
5-6290

NEXT
da m"Hell in
the Pacific"

SPECIAL JURY AWARD
to "JOANNA"
Rio Film Festival-Rio de Janero

"ONE 01
YEAR'
10 BES
Holis Alpert,A
Satu~rday Re view

IFTHE
S v
rthur Knight
7:00 & 9:00

"IRREVERENT,
OFF BEAT,
WACKY .. .
ENJOYED IT"
Ch -Gordon
Beauchamp,
Michigan Daily

2c
pxesen

Color by'Deluxe
PANAVISI0N*

a
' ! 1

THE U.S. GOVERNMENT plans to withhold funds from a
Northern school district for alleged racial discrimination in public
schools.
The Ferndale, Mich. school district was informed yesterday by
federal sources that it is violating the Civil Rights Act in maintaining
an all-Negro elementary school.
The district had been asked to submit a desegration plan by
March 1. The deadline was extended to March 31. Subsequent nego-
tiations between school officials and Leon Penatta, director of the
education office's civil rights division "failed to result in agreement
on the part of the school district to take corrective steps."
PAUL McCRACKEN said yesterday that he expects a cooling
of inflation-this year without an "unacceptable" increase in un-
employment.
McCracken, a former University professor, now chairman of the
Council of Economic Advisers, told labor union leaders that the eco-
nomy will likely "cool" during the second half of the year.
He said that the administration hopes to get government spend-
ing, taxing and credit policies on a noninflationary trend, but "not so
restrictive that later on we have to deal with a recession."
* * *
FIVE ARAB GUERILLA ORGANIZATIONS yesterday flatly-
rejected King Hussein's six-point plan for peace in the Middle
East.
The announcement followed a secret meeting Monday among
the leaders of the resistance groups, including the Al Fatah commando
organization.
Hussein's plan - announced in Washington Thursday - resem-
bles the United Nations resolution of Nov. 1967 which calls for Israeli
withdrawal from occupied Arab territory in return for an end to the
Arab state of belligerency.
Hussein, who claimed he spoke for Egyptian president Nasser as
well as himself, also declared that Israel's shipping would be allowed
through the Suez Canal and the Straits of Tiran. However, on Friday
Egypt herself refused to specify which bodies of water were acceptable
for Israeli shipping,
NORTH VIETNAMESE TROOPS attacked a US army camp
near the Cambodian border yesterday.
The attack, launched by about 1000 soldiers, was one of the cost-
liest yet around the border areas. The assault was on the Diamond III
base which is about 30 miles northwest of Saigon.
In the past two weeks the North Vietnamese have staged two,
other attacks on two nearby bases.
S* "
PRESIDENT NIXON plans to create a commission to recom-
mend an overhaul of the tax structure, White House sources an-
nounced yesterday.
Presidential counselor Arthur Burns told reporters the commis-
sion will probably be asked to report its recommendations next De-
cember, in time for Nixon's request for tax legislation at the opening
of Congress in January, 1970.
One objective of the administration's tax program is to eliminate
income taxes entirely for all families below the poverty line, Burns
disclosed.
THE BRITISH GOVERNMENT increased taxes and proposed
to curb costly wildcat strikes yesterday.
However, the Labor government raised old-age pensions in an
effort to soften the effects of the tax increase.
Chancellor of the Exchequer Roy Jenkins made the announce-
ment. The aim of the British budget is to regulate unemployment and
growth in addition to Britain's balance of payments, which has been
in deficit for years.

-Daily-Peter Dreyfuss
The Corpse Corps
Students paraded yesterday on the Diag as part of a "death and oppression" march sponsored by
Resistance. The march will continue through tomorrow and Thursday.
COURSE ANNOUNCEMENT:
'UAW charges University held.
outrageous, anti-union' seminar

. Korea
downs U.S.
airplane-
(Continued from Page 1)
plane, on possible military alerts
and on whether the United States
or the U.N. Command in Korea
had contacted the North Koreans
to discuss the plane and crew's
fate-
The North Korean broadcast
gave no hint as to the fate of the
crew, 30 Navy men and a Marine.
An air search was joined by the
U.S. destroyers Tucker and Dale.
All Japanese ships in the a r e a
were alerted. The U.S. Embassy in
Moscow asked the Foreign Minis-
try to send any Soviet ships in the
area to join the search for sur-
vivors.
The U.S. reconnaissance plane
took off f r o m Atsugi, Japan, on
what . the Defense Department
called a routine reconnaissance
flight.
Daniel Z. Henkin, the Defense
Department's chief spokesman,
said "the aircraft w a s in com-
munication with its base during
its mission."
Henkin told newsmen the plane,
carrying six- tons of electronic
equipment, was on a routine mis-
sion "similar to hundreds of mis-
sions which have been flown over
international waters in that area
since 1950" - the year the Ko-
rean War broke out.
"We have no information at this
time which confirms the sighting
of any survivors," Henkin added.
The Defense Department s a I d
the crew was not unusually large,
because monitoring equipment re-
quires a number of operators.
'Most officials in and out of
Congress viewed the situation with
great concern but stressed a cau-
tious approach.
One congressional leader, how-
ever, called for military retalia-
tion with "whatever is necessary."
Rep. Mendel L. Rivers (D-S.C.),
chairman of the House Armed
Services Committee, said if nuc-
lear weapons are necessary, "let
them have it."
"It's time to give them what
they ask for," Rivers said. "We
can dispose of them without full-
scale war."
Meanwhile, U.S. Air Force res-
cue planes scoured the Sea of
Japan early this morning in
search of the plane.
In Washington, the Pentagon
reported a search plane spotted
debrisbin the area where the plane
was believed downed. A spokes-
man said the debris "could be as-
sociated with the missing air-
craft," but "no survivors have
been reported."

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El-

F

APRIL 18-19

SINDERELLA AND THE,

GOLDEN BRA

United Auto Workers have accused the Uni-
versity's Bureau of Industrial Relations of blun-
dering by offering an anti-union seminar.
The bureau, which is part of the Graduate
School of Business Administration, held a spec-
ial class last Saturday entitled "Labor Relations
for Foreman in a Non-union Plant."
Union leaders have complained about a flyer
sent out by the bureau announcing the course.
The flyer began, "Your foremen are the key
people in keeping your company nonunion. We
designed this special Saturday seminar for
them."
Another portion of the pamphlet said-the fore-
men "would be adequately prepared if your
company becomes the target of an organizational
drive."
All six of UAW's regional sponsors in the
state charged that it is outrageous for a tax-
supported state institution to permit spon-
sorship of this type of seminar."
The bureau contended the course was "con-
ducted for the sole purpose of helping company

supervisors to understand employes more fully
so that they might respond to them."
The spokesman for the Bureau said he felt
the UAW directors "were reading a little too
much into the announcement. The Union Lead-
ers maintained that it is irresponsibleto feature
this type of activity in a public institution.
They said, "To find that a great state univer-
sity; which is supported by the taxes of millions
of working people and union members, engages
in activities designed to thwart collective bar-
gaining and unionization, comes as a most un-
pleasant and unwelcome surprise.
In other UAW action, concerning the Univer-
sity, the United Auto Workers donated $1,000 to
the tenants union in support of the present Ann
Arbor rent strike several weeks ago.
There was some indication that the UAW
might be able to help the Tenants Union polit-
ically at a later date in the strike's development
if help is needed.

"Filled with infinite profundity."
-The Board

Fri., Sat., 7-9 P.M.

Aud. A, Angell

75c

SPECIAL 11:00 SHOWINGS
both Fri. and Sat. nights
SHANGHAI EXPRESS
with MARLENE DIETRICH
directed by Von Sternberg
COWBOY'FESTIVAL

-

I

-

during study days

MONDAY, APRIL 21

MY PAL TRIGGER
Roy Rogers, Dale Evans, Gabby Hayes

erma-Seen roducts nnounces
that the HAAB BRO'S HARDWARE, 11509 PLEASANT LAKE RD., MANCHESTER,
MICH., will handle their nationally advertised products.
FLOORS'
Businessmen and housewives will appreciate our floor products which were devel-
oped to make tie floors seemless, to end the waxing problem and produce a high
gloss, NON-SKID finish that is stain and scuff proof. It will not chip, crack or peel
and cleans with a dry mop. We have a product for every kind of floor-tile, lino-
leum, wood, concrete. Recommended in "Hospital Handbook" for use in hospitals.
It cuts maintenance costs by 75% and disinfecting costs by 50%.
CARS
Coat your car with our specially designed finish to prevent salt and rust problems,
and end stone chipping, also the bug problem, and eliminate the need for waxing.
MIATC

resistance sponsors
ALTERNATIVES

wed:

12:00 RICK BOARDMAN, DRAFT RESISTER-speaking on the Diag
(rain: Union)
Rick has been working for the past two years with the ChicagaArea Draft
Resisters (CADRE). He was ,recently tried and found guilty of refusing to
report for alternative service. He will be sentenced within the week.
LIBERATION WORKSHOPS: TWO SESSIONS-on the Diog
(rain: Union lounge)
1:00 "U" and Gov't Research: the Control of Knowledge-Radical Pacifism-
Women in Radical Politics--Life Styles Resistance-White Racism-Rad-
ical Poetry (b.y.o.)-Women's Liberation-Revolutionary Youth Politics
-Prison Tapes (802 Monroe basement) plus others
2:30 Organic Food (b.y.o.) -High School Organizing-Imperialism-Alterna-
tives to the Draft-Dylan-Student Worker Alliance (3:00)
thurs. LIFE AND LIBERATION
12:00 DRAFT CARD TURN-IN AND RALLY-on the Diog

TUESDAY, APRIL 22

THE PROFESSIONALS
Lee Marvin, Claudia Cardinale,
Burt Lancaster, Jack Palance

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