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April 15, 1969 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-04-15

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Tuesday, April 15, 1969
Hurons scalp error-prone
By ERIC SIEGEL the throw down to the head of the h

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Sev

The W o1 v e r i n e diamondmen{
staged a tragedy of errors yester-
day afternoon at Ferry Field and
wound up on the short end of a
4-2 game against the Eastern
Michigan Hurons.
The Wolverines didn't start!
their show until the top of the
fifth inning, when the Hurons
used three Michigan miscues and,
a passed ball, along with a pair
of singles and a perfectly executed
double steal that caught the Blue
sleeping, to score three unearned.
runs.
With one out in the top of that
fatal frame, Eastern's backstop
Gary Krupinski lined a single to
left center, the third hit of the
afternoon off the Wolverines'
starting, and losing, pitcher Gary
Christmann.,
Huron hurler Rick Krumm then
sent an easy bouncer down to
third-sacker Glenn 'Redmon. But
Redmon couldn't find the handle
on the ball, both runners were
safe, and the floodgates were open.
Leadoff batter Terry Collins fol-
lowed with a single up the

daily

diamond.

sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
MORT NOVECK
middle, scoring Krupinski, and
Krumm took third as first base-
man Tom Lundsted muffled the
throw from center field,
Redmon then committed his
second error of the inning as he
threw away a Reggie Berringer
grounder to score Krumm with the
Hurons second tally of the frame
and move Collins down to second.
Collins then took third as a Christ-
mann curveball got away from
catcher Pete Titone.
Christmann got Jeff Peck on a
pop fly to the porous Redmon, but
Berringer caught the Wolverine.
moundsman napping and swiped
second as Collins came home on

SPORT SHORTS:
Purdue drops black sprinters;
'Blitzed' Namath stopped cold
By The Associated Press
* LAFAYETTE, Ind. - Three moustached Negro athletes have
been dropped from the Purdue University track team in a swirling
dispute involving a clean-shave rule, a bomb scare at the Purdue air-
port and a march of black students on the Lafayette City Hall.
* * *
4 MIAMI - Football star Joe Namath was arrested yesterday on
three traffic charges, including drunk driving, after an officer said he
clocked the New York Jets' quarterback at 70 miles per hour.
Namath was booked at the Dade County jail on charges of care-
less driving, driving without a valid license and drunk driving. He
was released in less than hour on; his own recognizance.
* * 4*
" ST. LOUIS - St. Louis University announced yesterday the
appointment of James Polk as the school's basketball coach. Polk, 53,
has spent the past four seasons at Trinity University in Texas, where
he had a 69-28.record as coach..
St. Louis University officials had previously hired Joe Hall, as-
sistant coach at Kentucky University. However, a week after signing a
four-year contract, Hall said he wanted to return to Kentucky. His
request was granted.
~* * *
* NEW YORK - The New York Yankees acquired outfielder
Jimmie Hall from the Cleveland Indians yesterday for cash and a
minor league player to be delivered soon.
Hall, 31, opened the season in left field for the Indians' and has a
.260 lifetime batting average.
* BOSTON - Manager Dick Williams of the Boston Red Sox
was fined $200 yesterday for uncomplimentary remarks to umpire
Emmett Ashford after a 2-1 loss in 13 innings in Baltimore last Thurs-
day.

STheWolverines mounted their
own facsimile of an attack in
their half of the sixth inning, as
they scored both their runs and
knocked Krumm out of the box.
Christmann, who seemed to be
the only Wolverine who could do
anything right, started the rally
with a long double over the right-
fielder's head, and moved to third
on a wild pitch.
Chuck Schmidt then drew a
walk, placing runners on first and
third, and both men moved up on
Bud Forsythe's infield single into
the hole at short. That was all for
Krumm, who gave way to reliever
Tom Allen.
But Allen had to wait to quell
the Wolverines' uprising as the
Hurons took a line from the script
of Coach Moby Benedict's nine.
Redmon sent a bouncer down the
third base line, and the throw to
second forced Forsythe. But East-
ern's second sacker Collins, trying
for the double play, threw. the ball
behind first base, and Schmidt
came home with what proved to
be the Wolverines final. tally of
the afternoon.
Allen then retired cleanup bat-
ter John Kraft, who had his trou- '
bles with an 0-4 day, on a
grounder to the shortstop and
struck out rghtfielder John Arvai
to end the inning-
The Wolverines mounted a last
gasp threat in the bottom of the
ninth inning, after Krupinski, who
had three of the seven Huron hits,
tagged- Michigan reliefer Tom
Flezar with a 350-foot four-bagger
in the top half of that frame to
make the score 4-2 Eastern.
"He pitched well," commented
Benedict in reference to his start-
ing hurler's eight-inning, six hit
stint, in which he fanned five and
issued just two free passes.
"But the way you win a ball
game is to catch the ball and
make the big play," the Wolver-
ine mentor added. "We- just can't
make the big play when we need
it, and that's been the story all
year."
Benedict continued to analyze
the Wolverines' ills, saying, "Either
we get lousy pitching and a lot of
runs, or else we get decent pitch-
ing and we kick the ball around.
* * *

Wolverine
BIG TEN FINALS:

-Daily-Larry Robbins
atcher Pete Titone

rc fall to tlSl I

Wolverines Rydze wins national diving tit
Special To The Daily
Michigan diver Dick Rydze may
have surprised a lot of people
when he won the men's platform
diving at the National Amateur
Athletic Union Diving Champion-
ship this past weekend in Long
Beach, Calif.
However, Michigan Diving Coach
Dick Kimball said it came as no
surprise to him. "I expected
~.~Rydze to win," Kimball laid.
"Maybe it surprised some people
but it didn't surprisesme. He was

1!X alb.3. l l. .. 'Y KJ .J
Ohio State's Roger Clay calmly I however, and an offside penalty
booted a two-point conversion aft- alllowed Ohio State to kick the
er scoring the tying points on a ball out of danger.
last second try to give the Buck- The closing ten minutes of the
eye Ruggers a dramatic 8-6 vic- game contained enough excitement
tory over Michigan in the Big Ten to more than make up for the dull
championship game Sunday after- play earlier in the game. After re-
noon. Michigan had led 6-3 before pelling repeated Ohio S t a t e
Clay's heroics. thrusts, the Michigan team com-
The game began slowly, as both mitted an infractiont nd Clay
teams appeared tired and sluggish kicked a goal from thirty yards
after Saturday's games. In their out to tie the score.
Saturday victories against Iowa The score seemed to arouse the
and Indiana, Michigan had lost Michigan team, .and they came
the services of Dave Mildner and ,right back to , score less than a
Paul Howard, two experienced minute later on a 35-yard penalty
forwards. kick by Johnson from a difficult
Ohio State dominated the first angle.
half, constantly pinning down the The as six minutes o the game
Michigan attack. Although thec saw Michigan with their backs
Ohio State team repeatedly moved constantly against the wall. Ohio
into Michigan territory. - Colin State seemedl to always be inside
Worbric's booming kicks kept the the twenty-five, but they were
Buckeyes at bay. again and again stymied by Wob-
ric's fine kicking.
THE LONE score of the first WITH LESS than a minute
half came on Michigan's only left, Clay was awarded a penalty
thrust inside the Ohio State kick from thirty yards out, but
twenty-five. Mike Johnson, who his attempt fell short between the
scored all of Michigan's points in goalposts, and Michigan had ap-
the tournament, successfully kick- parently wog the game.
ed a fifteen yard penalty goal! Unfortunately for Michigan, the
after an Ohio State infraction. ;short kick was knocked-on behind
Michigan came to life early in the goal when fielded, and Ohio
the second half, driving inside the State was awarded a scrum from
five yardline. The drive stumbled, . five yards out.
$ I

:,' X } .aT:J t [ ? i:.:yr". a
Knicks Win
By The Associated Press
NEW YORK-The New York
Knicks tore loose early from Bos-
ton's defensive shackles and their
well - balanced, ball - hawking at-
tack stopped the Celtics 112-104
last night to keep them alive in
the Eastern Division finals of the
National Basketball Association
playoffs.
steadily brilliant throughout the
meet, and you've got to remem-
ber that this is a tougher meet
than the NCAA's. He has seasoned
with each meet."
Rydze, only a sophomore, took
advantage of a bad dive by In-
diana's Jim Henry, an Olympic
bronze medalist, to capture the
top spot. Rydze finished with
549.39, while Henry closed with
544.11 points.
Rydze, who has improved stead-
ily throughout the year, only.
competed in the platform event,
and Kimball said this was a fac-
tor in Rydze's triumph. "He came
out only to compete in platform
diving, so he wasn't as physically
or psychologically as tired as some
of the other boys. This was to his
advantage."
Michigan's Bruce McManaman
finished seventh in the platform
event and alsoplaced in the other
two diving' events, the three and
ten meter springboard events, a
feat that. few of the other com-
peting divers could manage. Ac-
cording to Kimball, McManaman
executed a two and a half back
pike off the ten-meter board, a
dive that few other divers attempt
and got top iscores for his effort.
Rydze's triumph came as a sur-
prise to many observers because
he had never won a really major
event, although he did win an in-
ternational meet in Canada only
last week. He finished ninth in
the NCAA tournament in March,
but his triumph makes him a defi-
r ite Wolverine threat in the
future.
summer
Language
Institute
FRENCH
GERMAN <
RUSSIAN
SPANISH
June 23-August 18, 1969
University of California
Santa Cruz
Living - learning language
programs for beginning and
intermediate students. Intensive
eight-week summer sessions
In residence at Cowell College,
UCSC. Live-in native speakers.
15 units University credit
offered. Financial aid available.
Application deadline: May 1st
Cost: $622 all inclusive
for further information,
please write:
Coordinator, Ben T. Clark,
Summer Language Institute;
UCSC; Santa Cruz,
California 95060

-Daily-Jay Cap

This Week in Sports
TODAY.
BASEBALL-Notre Dame at Ferry Field, 3:30 p.m.
FRIDAY
BASEBALL - Michigan State gat East Lansing
TENNIS - Wisconsin at Ferry Field, 3:00 p.m.
SATURDAY
BASEBALL - Michigan State at Ferry Field, 1:30 p m.
TENNIS - Northwestern at Ferry Field, 1:30 p.m.
TRACK - Ohio State Relays at Columbus

Dick Rydze

F

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Major League Standings

I

Frosh take two
Michigan's freshman baseball
team swept a. doubleheader from1
Eastern Michigan yesterday after-1
noon, 8-4 and 6-0.,
The Wolverines pounded out 26
hits in the two games as every
regular but one got at least one
hit in each game. Centerfielder
John Hornyack had five singles
and Bill Hellstein had four hits,
including a round-tripper, to lead
the Wolverine assault.
Gene Lanthorn went the rout in
the first game, giving up eight
hits and striking out 11. Lanthorn
helped his own cause by rapping
a two-run single.
Ed Bryson pitched a masterfull
two-hitter in the seven inning
second game. He struck out nine l
Hurons and walked only two in
racking up the shutout, and he
also rapped a two-run double.

American League
Yesterday's Results
Boston 5, Baltimnore 3
Kansas City at Seattle, night
Chicago at California, night
East Division'
W L P
Boston 5 1
Detroit 3 2
Baltimore 4 3
New York 3 3
Washington 3 4
Cleveland 0 5

West Division
xKansas City 4 2
xCalifornia 3 2
xSeattle 3 2
Oakland 3 3
xChicago 2 3
Minnesota 1 4
x-Late game'not included.

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571
.500
.429
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.667
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.400
.200

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National League '
Yesterday's Results
Chicago 4, Pittsburgh 0
Montreal 8, St. Louis 7
Philadelphia 5, New York 1
San Francisco at Cincinnati, night,
rain
Los Angeles at Houston, night
East Division
'W L Pct. G
hicago 6 1 .857 -
ittsburgh 5 2 .717 1
t. Louis 3 4 .4292
ontreal 3 4 .429
iew York 2 5 .2864
hiladelphia 2 5 .2864
West Division
tlanta 6 1 .857 -
os Angeles 3 2 .6002
an Deigo - 3 3 .5002
an Francisco 3 3 .500
lircinnati 2 4 .333

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- 4
In This Month's LIBERATION
THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO AFFAIR
by STAUGHTON LYNDI
ALSO
NEW U.S. STRATEGY IN VIETNAM / Dave Dellinger
UNLEARNING WHITE RACISM IN PHILADELPHIA / Steve Gold
MEDICAL IMPERIALISM / Robb Burlege

Where can you turn for full
information about
the draft
from deferments to
conscientious objection
from appeals to physics
from volunteering to resisting
how to find a good draft
counselor or lawyer
- i all the rights, choices,
and strategies you should
know to make your own
decisions and carry them
out with maximum
chances of success?
Now there is a book to
consult:
Guide to the Draft
by Arlo Tatum and
Joseph S. Tuchinsky
Available at
DraftbCounseling Center
502 E. Huron
Centicore, Marshalls,
and SBS

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10 % OFF to all UM STUDENTS
upon presentation of ID

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OVERHAUL ... . . .$67.50
RESEAL. .,..; $29.50

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Here-without
the hysteria-
is Red China's
case against
the West
In spite of all her clumsy propaganda,
Communist China does have a case
worth hearing. Our tradition of fair de-
bate, our sanity, and perhaps our ulti-
mate survival require that we hear it.
C. R. Hensman-a non-Communist Asian,
formerly a BBC producer-has dons a
vital service for the West by presenting
this case in calm, civil language. Drawing
upon documentary material not readily
available irithe U.S., he sheds revealing
light on China's mind, her motives, and
her real intentions toward her Asian
neighbors and toward the West.

.l
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ASK ABOUT OUR WRITTEN GUARANTEE
FINANCING AVAILABLE

YELLOW PERIL? By C/Re
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Paperbound $2.65, now at your college bookstore
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U.S. T.V. IN LATIN AMERICA / Jon Frappier
BRINGING THE UNIONS TO THE.MOVEMENT Jim Matles
LIBERATION is a movement magazine
Special student subscription $5. Send to 5 Beckman Street, NYC
NAME
ADDRESS
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For New
PONTIAC TEMPESTS
or
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Presenting:
THE
1969
MICHIGANENSIAN
Distribution-
(for those holding coupons)
1 1 .00-,.00

N :

OVERLAND TO
8
Persia, Kashmir & India
* Russia, The Caucasus & Central Asia
~ Japan via Siberia
The Balkans & Asia Minor

Leisurely driving trips in small groups
Covers: Food, lodging and transportation
DOES include trans-Atlantic jef
THESE ARE NOT "GUIDED TOURS":
The person leading each group knows
the area well and speaks the local lan-
guages. But any time you want to take
off on your own, you'll be provided with
the resources to operate independently.

10 or 12 WEEKS:
June 23-Sept. 1 or Sept. 14
STYLE is leisurely, to allow time for
swimming, picking fruit, stopping in
,villages or kolkhozes, meeting people.
No rush-10/12 weeks is a long time.
SPONSOR, organizer and entrepreneur

.......
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