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April 13, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-04-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


P

1

3rd HIT WEEK!
DIAL 8-6416

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-9354

ar4c

Sft~iian

atty

second front page

"CONSTITUTES MORE OF AN
EXPERIENCE THAN A SHOWI"

Sunday, April 13, 1969 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

U'

recruits

black apprentices

By SAM DAMREN
The University's skilled trades
apprenticeship program, which
has turned to giving priority to
black applicants, is making a
small but successful beginning.
Of the twelve applicants taken
since the new policy began ear-
ly this semester, seven have
been blacks. Of the previous 35
who had been in the program,
only one was black.
"This is a substantial and posi-
tive increase," says Clyde Briggs,
manager of counseling and
training in the apprenticeship
program. Applicants are being
taken from University personnel
and Washtenaw County.
The University has undertak-
en to recruit more blacks for the
skilled trades program in reac-
tion to the discriminatory poli-
cies of the trades unions which
have kept black skilled trades-
men to less than one half of one
per cent of the total in some

trades in Washtenaw County.
The University's program was
criticized in the past as well be-
cause the selection procedure
was based on tests which exhib-
ited unavoidable cultural biases.
During the last six months the
program stopped using any tests
to select applicants - in fact,
no applicants were being taken
at all for a time - and is now
making use of the education
school's guidance and counsel-
ing laboratory to aid it in se-
lecting and counseling appli-
cants.
A committee of plant depart-
ment personnel and housing of-
ficials reviews and recommends
candidates to plant department
officials who make the final de-
cisions. The decisions are bas-
ed on those recommendations
and the policy of black priority.
Both the selection committee
and the education school lab-
oratory are concerned with "af-

firmative action," says Richard
Dagget, training superintendent
in the personnel department
and a member of the committee.
"Affirmative action" is the
catch-phrase of liberals in the
skilled trades use to describe
compensatory programs to get
more blacks into the trades.
However, Prof. Donald Barr,
director of the guidance a n d
counseling laboratory, insists
the laboratory does not take
part in any decisions in the se-
lection of applicants.
Barr says the laboratory aids
in assessing t h e commitment,
motivation and desire of the ap-
plicant rather than their "paper
and pencil intelligence." Ap-
titude tests given to pro-
spective applicants are only to
aid the applicant and are not
used in recommendations, he
says.
T h e training program itself
began as a response to a short-

age of skilled tradesmen avail-
able to the University through
skilled trades unions, and only
attempted to train applicants
for University employment.
When University employes be-
came unionized almost a year
ago, the apprenticeship program
w a s restructured to prepare
trainees to receive their journ-
eyman papers.
Presently, the program is de-
signed to graduate fifty appli-
cants within four years.
Apprenticeship lasts from be-
tween 36 to 42 months, and is
purposely structured, ssa ys
Briggs, to allow trainees to
progress at their own rate."
Competition from high local
factory wages has forced the
program to recruit its own ap-
prentices who throughout their
apprenticeship are paid sub-
stantially less than the journey-
men they work under.

Firebomb rips
housing office
in WMU union
KALAMAZOO O--The student center at Western Mich-
igan University firebombed early yesterday causing extensive
damage to an administrative office in the building, Kalama-
zoo police said.
Students living in a nearby dormitory said they heard
the sound of breaking glass, then saw flames. Police said a
rock had been used to break a plate glass window, then a
home-made firebomb was thrown through.
There was no immediate estimate of damage.
The burned office was identified as that of housing
director Thomas Carr. Carr said all equipment in the room
was destroyed, but added that the "real loss" was in the paper

THE ACCLAIMED MOTION PICTURE-JohnCassav tms"FACES"
:::.''M.. .i": ?$!..JC l"!!~i.: /. ' . ...:"..\i::v4;
Center for Russian and East European Studies
presents a lecture by
ABRAHAM BRUMBERGr
Editor,
Problems of Communism 40
: DISSENT IN THE USSR"..
TIME: 4:10 P.M., Monday, April 14
PLACE: Auditorium D, Angell Hall
Mr. Brumberg has been a member of the staff of
Problems 'of Communism since 1952 and its editor-
in-chief since 1957. He is the author of two books
and many articles on the Soviet Union, and the editor
of a forthcoming volume on dissent and protest in
the USSR.
~':'a'? :":ey}>":a"a*. dtR<:' $2.." ::' .o.".Erw,\ ":.xx;:: : .x:n"%:-{}::r:,£":. E}:: ~:

SATURDAY and SUNDAY
MONIKA
dir. Ingmar Bergman
Swedish 1952
Bergman's
most erotic film
"The most beautiful film of the
most original cineastes"
-Jean luc Godard
SHORT: WORK
Charles Chaplin
7 & 9 ARCHITECTURE
662-8871 AUDITORIUM

CONTROVERSY COOLS
Harvard faculty to study issues

(Continued from Page 1)
much concern for the adminis-
tration. The group had refused to
support the original six SDS de-
mands and had aligned itself with
the moderates alling for restruc-
turing and amnesty.
Early yesterday the group an-
nounced its sympathy with t h e'

SDS demands and congratulated
SDS for taking over the building,
but then there were less than 400
persons in the crowd to hear what
several days ago probably would
have been considered an irrespon-
sibly radical move.
The memorial church group
(MEM) - it h e moderate group

r- --

the
n"ewse today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service"

INTERNAL SQUABBLES as well as student and labor unrest
once again threatened Italy's four-month-old government yester-
day.
Deeply concerned with the wave of strikes and student and labor
demonstrations protesting the police's handling of a riot in Batti-
paglia last Wednesday, the coalition parties are faced with conflicting
demands that the police be disarmed and that they become tougher
with future demonstrators.
* * *
CZECHOSLOVAKIAN AUTHORITIES yesterday announced
that the number of Soviet troops in their country would be in-
creased, but later withdrew the announcement.
The withdrawal of the statement was surprising since a troop
buildup had been rumored for some time. No explanation for the
series of maneuvers was given by the Czechoslovakian government.
CONGLOMERATE MERGERS will become increasingly dif-
ficult to obtain, the Federal Trade Commission announced yester-
day.
In an effort to slow the pace of mergers, the FTC will not require
that corporations submit notification of planned mergers involving
assets valued at more than $250 million 60 days in advance.
In addition, the acquisition by one firm of more than ten per
cent of another company's stock must be similarly reported to the
commission.

which h a d originally called for
the.strike and amnesty - suffered
from internal quibbling and dis-
sent. Its leadership yesterday ap-
peared to be vying for the little
power .that remained.
SDS originally took over Uni-
versity Hall demanding the imme-
diate abolition of ROTC and the
administration's promise not to ex-
pand the University into outlying
urban areas where, SDS claimed,
poor families w o u l d be evicted
without good prospects for equi-
table relocation.
Both issues remain muddled
mainly because the administration
- even in the wake of evidence
favoring SDS-continues to main-
tain the issue is "irrelevant" and
.thus refuses to comment on it.
Early this semester the Harvard
College faculty voted to end aca-
demic credit for ROTC and-in-
structed the administration to be-
gin re-negotiation with the mili-
tary to implement the faculty
consensus,
Statements by President Na-
than Pusey and other administra-
tors incensed SDS, whose mem-
bers claimed thesadministration
was stalling. Pusey had been
quoted as saying the process for
implementation of the faculty
consensus could take until Sep-
tember, 1970.
The administration has been ev-
en more evasive concerning Har-
vard expansion, playing politics
with very clumsy tactics. The
main controversy centers around
the proposed Kennedy Memorial
Library and a medical school an-
nex which SDS charges will neces-
sitate the demolition of more than
200 apartments in the Roxbury
area of Cambridge.

work, including most univer-
sity housing records.
WMU has recently been the
scene of student unrest, with stu-
dents protesting against the deci-
sion-making structure concerning
such matters as housing, the stu-
dent newspaper, :and studet dis-
cipline.
Nine days ago, the demonstra-
tions became violent, when ap-
proximately 200 state police were
called in to clear the streets of
some 6,000 students who had
gathered in front of the university
president's house.
Forty-two persons were arrested
in that demonstration and 31 of
them charged with unlawful as-
sembly. Charges against four of
the 31 will be dropped, Kalamazoo
County Prosecuting Attorney Don-
ald A. Burgee said Friday. t

Dorm fast
to aid Biafra
The University and the Biafra
Relief Fund have made arrange-
ments allowing students who wish
to skip all meals next Wednesday
to contribute the cost of their food
to the fund.
Students living in all University
housing units providing food ser-
vices who wish to contribute may
do so by signing their names on
lists in their dorms no' later than
tomorrow.
For each student who signs, the
University will contribute the one
dollar cost of the student's raw
food to the fund in the name of
the student.

-Assoclated Press
Bombed office at WMU

SEPTEMBER 16-28.
SARO )

(AN'S

'a

GRADUATING SENIORS:
Announcements Will
Be on Sale Today )
Through April 18 at
the Information Desk
[S & A Building *

I-,

Foreign Student' Escorts
' J
Meet a foreign student next fall. Give your
personal touch to his first experiences in the ;
United States and the University of Mich-
SSummer
Address
BRING TO SECOND FL06R UNION
SINTERNATIONAL COMMITTEE,
r//wiiii///irw/iw/irw// ir

Another delightful APA revival of an American classic!

SEPTEMBER30-OCTOBER 12 p

Ghelderode's

"A whiff of satanical sulphur"
by the author of the APA hit "Pantagleize"
Directed by John Houseman

l
w:,:

I

I

OCTOBER 14-26
I Gogol's

I

The
Fill IV,
op 9f

Directed by
Stephen Porter

/,

P in am n, ..,crr es

i

31 -~- u N emi U

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