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April 11, 1969 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-04-11

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The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
________________________________________________aged by students of the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michi-
gan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $9 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Sell
April 11-12
a
KING OF HEARTS P
Alan BatesP
Genevieve Bujold
"Wildly raffish, slapstick
and satire"-N.Y. Times
FRIDAY-and SATURDAY, 7-9 P.M. in Daily
Aud. A, Angell 75c Classifieds
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TONITE SEE
at
H? I!B'QUII1i US
and8 . free fd ADMISSION $2.00
SATURDAY and chairs only $1 50 after 2nd set1

NEWS PHONE:
764-0552

ir ri ttn

But 1#

second

front page

Friday, April 11, 1969

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

Page Three

Overflowing rivers
cause flood damage

By The Associated Press
F 1 o o d dangers continued
throughout the midwest yester-
day as rivers overflowed in
Minnesota, Iowa, and the Da-
kotas.
Minnesota Governor, Harold
LeVander asked President Nixon
to declare a major disaster area
in 58 western counties of the
state. Such action would make
them eligible for federal flood
relief funds.
The worst damage was done
in South Dakota and Iowa
where the Big Sioux River broke
a dike and overflowed at Sioux
Falls, S.D.
The swelling rIver caused the
evacuation of an industrial-
residential area in the town and

hundreds of others were forced
to evacuate the area.
The city's largest business,
the John Morrell Packing Plant,
ceased operations and shut
down its adjacent stock yards.
Farther south, fumes added to
the hazards just below the point
where the Big Sioux meets the
Missouri River. A natural g a s
line was /ruptured and gas
'spread over the area. Smoking
was banned as a result.
The flood reached Enderlin,
North Dakota near the Sheyenne
River causing the evacuation of
several homes there. And Jack-
son, Minn. lost telephone com-
munication Wednesday night
when flood waters washed out
underground lines.

r-°

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

Flood waters cover Sioux City, Iowa

Nixon

proposes

an

- _ 4

I

Program Information: 2-6264

2ND WEEK

OF
SIDE-SPLITTING
LAUGHS

FUNNIER THAN
"CAT BALLOU"!VV
-HUMOR in the Tradion
of Hawks' "Rio Bravo" and
"El Dorado"
-SOCIAL SATIRE
AS MODERN AS
-TODAY-
The sheriff prefers sarcasm
to violence.
The villain has false teeth, dyed
hair, and a son who didn't get
past second grade in school.
The heroine was "hit hard by
puberty."
The' jail cells have no bars.
SHOWS AT 1,t3, 5,7, 9
Feature 20 Minutes Later
ALSO Surfing Classic
"WET & WILD"

d
.T
I
1a
I

THE SOVIET UNION REJECTED an American compromise
offer to curb the nuclear armaments race.
The Soviets insisted on an old Russian proposal repeatedly term-
ed unnacceptable by the United States.
The treaty, reintroduced by the United States, was a plan for a
cutoff in production of fissionable nuclear material for atomic wea-
pons with modified control provisions. The United States was ready
to abandon its original demand for "adversary inspection" in favor
of inspectors from the International Atomic Energy Agency.
The two powers announced that they will begin talks on Monday
n Vienna on making available peaceful nuclear explosives which
could transform the economics of presently developing countries.
PRESIDENT NGUYEN VAN THIEU said yesterday he
believes that South Vietnamese forces will be able to replace
some American units before the end of the year.
He gave no exact timetable or numbers of troops involved.
Thieu emphasized that this replacement operation would be
distinct from mutual withdrawal of North Vietnamese forces and
American and other allied troops. This type of withdrawal has yet'
to be negotiated, he said.
"I think this replacement is still possible as our forces improve,"
Thieu said. "In the last months of this year this could happen."
FRENCH PRESIDENT CHARLES DE GAULLE said yester-
day he will "quit" if French voters reject his referendum on gov-
ernment centralization and Senate reform.
DeGaulle wants to transfer some of the central government's
power to new regional governments and reduce the national Senate
to a purely advisory role.
In a television debate DeGaulle revised the whole question of the
referendum. It is now a question of confidence in his leadership, not
of the merits of the proposals.
DR. DENTON A. COOLEY said yesterday there were no vio-
lations of federal guidelines in his implantation of an artificial
heart because there was no federal money involved.
The National Heart Institute (NHI), has been asked to investi-
gate the question by Dr. Michael DeBakey, Cooley's colleague.
THE GOVERNMENT IS STEPPING UP EFFORTS to simu-
late perfection of an artificial heart capable of being totally im-
planted in the human body. This would contrast with Dr. Cooley's
externally powered one.
Dr. Frank Hastings of the NHI said there is reason to hope that
by 1973 there may be 'a robot heart based on a new concept of in-
ternal energy-supply "fuel cells."
FIGHTING ACROSS THE SUEZ CANAL broke out yesterday
between Egypt and Israel breaking an 11-day calm across the
waterway.
The 13-hour long battle was the longest and hardest in the past
seven days. Radio Cairosaid Egyptian forces halted fire at 6:35 p.m.
by agreement with U.N. truce observors. An Israeli spokesman said
Israeli forces observed a cease fire beginning at 6:15 p.m.

WASHINGTON (R) - Presi-
dent Nixon proposed yester-
day a three-point plan for
stepping up NATO political
consultations and teamwork
in dealing with social prob-
lems.
At the same time foreign min-
isters of the North Atlantic Treaty
Organization studied with cau-
tious interest the recent proposal
by the rival Communist Warsaw
Pact Powers for a general East-
West conference on European se-
curity.
West German Foreign Minister

Willy Brandt suggested that t h e
Western allies reply with a de-
claration of "readiness in princi-
ple" for such a parley - and let
subsequentdevelopments estab-
lish whether the Reds are genu-
inely interested in a broad settle-
ment.
Nixon's public address and t h e
closed sessions of the foreign and
defense ministers from the 15
NATO nations highlighted the
start of the two-day 20th anniver-
sary meeting of the alliance.'
The President's speech did not
deal directly with the Warsaw
Pact proposal issued in a declara-
tion from Budapest March 17,

CHURCH SHOOTING:

to strengthen

NATO

Black leader offers
to surrender. suspect-

CHEROKEE PRODUCTIONS Presents

DETROIT {P) - With one of
his soldiers in police custody, the
president of a black separatist
group yesterday volunteered to
surrender another sought on
charges of murdering a white
policeman.
Milton R. Henry, a Pontiac,
Mich., attorney and first v i c e
president of the one-year-old Re-
public of New Africa, sent a tele-
gram to Police Commissioner Jo-
hannes F. Spreen volunteering to
bring Rafael Viera to Recorder's
criminal court for arraignment.
The telegram did not indicate
when, but a spokesman for t h e
black separatist group said he as-
sumed Henry meanttoday.
Meanwhile Alfred Hibbit,
charged with Wounding a police-
man in the gun battle last month
at the New Bethel Baptist Church,
surrendered yesterday.

Hibbitt was held under $25,000
bond, and a preliminary hearing
was ordered for April 18. -
Police said Hibbitt and the other
suspect, Rafael Viera of New
York, were members of the Black
Legion, the military arm of the
separatist Republic of New Africa..
The Republic of New Africa had
rented the church and was meet-
ing in it the night of the shoot-
out.
Detroit police had announced
earlier yesterday that federal fugi-
tive warrants had been issued for
two men held after last month's
shoot-out in which one patrolman
was killed and another wounded.
In addition, two "John Doe"
warrants have been issued for per-
sons allegedly involved in the
shooting.
Hibbitt was one of eight men
released on $1000 bond over po-
See SUSPECT, Page '7

co-starring HARRY MORGAN JACK ELAM
Written and Produced by WILLIAM BOWERS Directed by BURT KENNEDY
I Suggested For GENERAL Audiences COLOR-United Artistsg
by DeluxeEn "ertanetf ro 11

though it left the way open for
further efforts to improve East-
West relations.
Recalling words of President
Dwight D. Eisenhower that f i v e
fingers balled into a fist are
stronger than one finger alone,
Nixon went on to say:
"We need such an instrument of
defense; the United States will
bear its fair share in keeping
NATO strong.
"All of us are also ready, as
conditions ch'ange, to turn th a t
fist into a hand of friendship."
A central Nixon theme was that
the Western alliance has had a
military defense for 20 years and
still needs a "strong military di-
mension.",
The President made no mention
of any U.S. troop cuts at this time.
Substantial sentiment exists in
the U.S. Senate for reducing the
320,000-man U.S. force now in
Europe.
Nixon stated, generally that
"NATO is needed and the-Amer-
ican commitment to NATO will
remain in force and remain
strong."
But as NATO heads ,into its
third decade it also needs "a more
profound political image, to shape
a strategy of peace", plus a social
dimension to deal with the qual-
ity of life in the West, he said
He proposed:
- Periodic meetings of NATO
deputy foreign ministers "for a
high-level review- of major, long-
range problems before the al-
liance."
- Creation of a special politi-
cal planning group to "address it-
self specifically and continually to
the longer-range problems we
face."
-- Formation of "a committee
on the challenges of modern so-
ciety . , . to explore ways in which
the experience and the resources
of the Western nations could most
effectively be marshalled toward
improving the quality of life of
our peoples."
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BRING QUICK RESULTS
In an attempt
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first annual
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Sat., nite - April 12
8:30 P.M.
at Avehicle
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(behind Berry's Appliance store)
STARRING
Commander Cody &
The Lost Planet Airmen

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And wo couldn't get Phil Silvers to fall in love
with Peter Lawford. ("I'm fond of him',' said Silvers,
"But I just don't love him'.)
And neither one of them would make a pass
at Telly Savalas.
So we had to make a picture - where the men
only like women ... and the women only dig men.
Yes, it seems we've made an "old fashioned"
picture (remember them?)
where you'd be laughing
one minute and crying
the next?
Try us for
an hour and
fifty-two'"
minutea.'
J ustl 11
ee i
see if this

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3rd HIT WEEK!
"CONSTITUTES MORE OF AN
EXPERIENCE THAN A SHOW1"
Time Magazine
.Fffj4',

CLOUDS OVER

AN ISRAELI FILM

"Mrs. Campbell
provides a

SR AEL

isn't one of
the funniest
pictures you've
ever seen...
if you haven't
gotten more laughs

p-

buons se aindeed!
A fresh, frenetic,
hilarious
and even touching
human comedy.
Melvin Frank has assembled
a remarkable cast to
bring it to sparkling life.
A very funny movie!"

"A humanist's view of the
tensions in / the Middle
East on the 21st anniversary
of Israel's rebirth." Not
a documentary, but an insight into
the attitudes. conflicts, and peoile in the story of

I .... .........

1I

l'i

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