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April 09, 1969 - Image 17

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-04-09

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'{'

Thursday, April 10, 1969

THE m(cH1GAN DAILY

Thursday, April 10, 1969 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Braves scalp iants
By The Associated Press
ATLANTA-Milt Pappas retired 14 San Francisco batters
W in order: last night but needed relief help from Cecil Ulpshaw
as the Atlanta Braves trimmed the Giants 4-1 and swept
their season-opening, three-game series,.
thPappas was touched for three hits, a walk and a' run in
'tefirst inning before settling down. He didn't allow another
baserunner until thle sixth when Bobby Bonds beat out an
infield hit.
The Braves scored twice against Bobby Bolin in the
bottom of the first. Felix Millan, who reached on a force play,
stole second and scored on
Hank Aaron's double, the first
of his three hits. Orlando Ce-
peda singled Aaron across. a
Clete Boyer's homer in the sixth , o-
made it 3-1 and the Braves added
their final run in the inning on F
Sonny Jackson's double and .a S
single by rookie catcher Bob
Didier. NIGHT EDITOR
Cus kl *BILL DINNER
Cubs bill Ph illpies r

for

sweep

Ageless Celtics crush Knicks
1 1 9.o7 0 to, t 1111a rirocuvl

BOSTON (N) - The Boston
Celtics, led by player-Coach
Bill Russell, threw up a° tight
early defense and shackled
ice-cold New York in the first
half en route to a 112-97 vic-
tory over the Knicks and a 2-0
lead in their Eastern Division
final series in the National
Basketball Association play-
offs.,
Boston--the defending NBA
champions charged to a 26-14 first
period lead and built the advant-
age to 55-33 at halftime in sweep-
ing to a convincing triumph.
The third game in the best-of-
7 series will be played in New
York tonight.
Russell, who has led the Celtics
to 10 championships in 12 years,
was the dominating factor as he
virtually intimidated the New
York sharpshooters.
The Knicks managed just three
field goals in- 23 attempts in the
opening period and had a shooting
mark of just 19.2 percent as they
hit on only nine of 47 shots in
the opening half.
Russell had 11 of his 14 points
and 21 of his 29 rebounds in the
first two periods. With the Cel-
tics in front 95-69 and nearly 812
minutes remaining Russell went to
the bench for a well-deserved rest
as a capacity crowd of 14,933
gave him a standng ovation.
Veteran Bailey Howell topped
the Celtics with 27 points. John
" Havlicek had 15, Sam Jones and
Tom Sanders 13 each with Em-
mette Bryant adding 11.
Willis Reed, New York's big
center led the Knicks' scoring with
28 points.

LItr1.G I. WV 1,1.I1 LG LGlU,1

CHICAGO-The Chicago Cubs'
banged seven doubles, including a
record-tying four by Billy Wil-
liams, to back Bill Hands' seven-
hit pitching for an 11-3 victory
over the Philadelphia Phillies yes-
terday.
Williams, whose fourth doublel
came in a wild seven-run 'Cub sev-
enth, matched a major league
record shared by 29 players and
last tied in 1963 by Detroit's Billy
Bruton.
. Four doubles came as 11 batters
faced relief rs Gary Wagner and
Luis Peraza in the big Chicago
M seventh.
The Cubs broke a 2-2 tie with
an unearned pair in the fourth
on first baseman Richie Allen's
high throw over second.
* * '
Pirates hang Cardinals
ST. LOUIS - Left-hander Bob
Veale spaced six hits in pitching
the 'Pittsburgh Pirates to a 6-1
victory over the St. Louis Cardi-

nals last night, their second
straight win against the defend-
ing National League champions.
Two errors by Julian Javier,
the St. Louis second baseman,
helped the Pirates to two unearn-
ed runs.
Pittsburgh scored twice in the
fourth off starter Nelson Briles.
After Javier fumbled Rich Heb-
ner's grounder for a two-base
error, Robert Clemente got an in-
field hit and Willie Stragell dou-

-Associated Press
SAL BANDO of the Oakland Athletics tags out White Sox catcher Duane Josephson at third
base in the second inning of yesterday's game. Reggie Jackson made the throw from right field as
Ken Berry had singled for the Sox and Josephson was trying to advance from first to third. Chicago,
however, did score three runs while blanking the A's.

bled home the first run
* * *
ff ets bury Exe
NEW YORK - Reli
McGraw pitched out ofa
inning jam, then stymi
treal until the eighth
needed help from Nolan
the New York Mets def
Expos 9-5 yesterday.
It was the first loss, fo
pansion Expps followi
opening day victoryc
Mets.

n' New York exploded for four in bouncer and turned it into a dou- ton snapped a 1-1 tie and gave
the first inning against Bill Stone- ble play. He then got Rusty Staub the Reds their first victory.
pOS ham, two on Ed Kranepool's on a foul pop, ending the inning. Jim Maloney worked the first
ever Tug bases-loaded single.**. six innings for i at llow-
a second- But the Expos rallied in the Rd h o six innings for .Cincinnati, allow-
~ eod u h xo ale hte Reds whip .IDOdgers ing one run and three hits. But
ed Mon- second inning and had two runs 'he Re ace as fored t Beav
when he in, the bases loaded and none out CINCINNATI -Bobby Tolan, the game when he pulled a ham-
Ryan as when McGraw relieved starter who hit only five home rurs allhd
eated the Jim McAndrews. last year. cracked his second in as string muscle running out a
McGraw walked Maury Wills many games last night, carryingj
r the ex- on a 3-2 pitch, forcing in the third the Cincinnati Reds to a 3-1 vic-
ng their run of the inning, but then the tory over the Los Angeles Dodgers.
over the '24-year-old left-hande'r leaped Tolan's two-run shot in the Major Leag
high for G a r y Sutherland's seventh inning against Don Sut- 'iAerican League
East Division

-Associated Press
HUSTLING CELTIC JOHN HAVLICEK battles for a rebound
amidst three New York Knicks including former Piston, Dave
DeBusschere. The Boston squad proved as unbeatable as ever at
home as they continued their playoff success 112-97.
New York was hurt badly .s "You have to look at the games,
Dave DeBusschere ran into foul he said. "Some they could havf
trouble and sat out much of the won. It was no indication of thi
game. DeBusschere failed to closeness of the series."
score. "It was one of our real gooc
"Bill Russell is.a .great defensive games," Russell said, "but yot
basketball player - he is the have to admit they missed somi
greatest defensive center who ever easy shots. We can't take credi
lived." for that. We played good defense
That was iWew York Coach Red but not that good."
Holzman's first comment in the t not that good.
quiet Knicks' dressing room last
night after Russell and the Bos-
ton Celtics had won the "no con'- MEN
test" game. F try.-e.4t a new hairstyle
Russell said his club wasn't designed to your
doing anything different than personlity. .
during the regular season when OPEN 3 NIGHTS
.nMon.-Thurs.-Fri. 10 4 9
it lost six of seven decisions to Tues.-Wed.-Sat. 9 to 6
the same Knicks. "I can't account DASCOLA BARBERS ,
for it," he said. J fLA~K5K
Holzman, however, said the reg-
ular season record was misleading, at Mople Village-Campus
U.

ue Standings

IM SITE AND FEES AT ISSUE:

IVI

ProPosa s meet strong opposion

1
!l
1
7
i
i
i1

D~etroi t
Boston
Washington
New York
Baltimore
Cleveland
Kansas 1Ci t
Seattle
Oakland
Chicago
Slinnesota
Califoria

W 1, pett..
1 0 1.000
1 0 1.000
I 1 .500
1 1 .500
0 1 .000
0 1 .000

GB
1
1
I.

Chicago
Pittsburgh
New York
Montreal
St. Louis
Philadelphia

National League
East Division
W L
2 0
2 0
1 1
1 I
0 2
. 0 2
West Division

Pct.
1.000
1.000
.500
.500
.000
.000

t

GB
1
1
2
2
I14
1Y
2
3

West Division

By LEE KIRK
The Advisory Committee on In-
tramurals, Recreation and Club
Sports had its last scheduled meet-
ing on the two proposed IM build-
ings yesterday afternoon in the
Anderson Room of the Union.
Several students voiced vehement
objections to the proposed North
Campus site on Fuller Road and
the use of student fees to finance
the building.
University President Robben
Fleming opened the meeting with
a few brief remarks, but he had
to leave in order to fill out his1
income tax form. '
Allan Smith, Vice-President for
Academic Affairs, then t o o k
a charge of the meeting and intro-
duced four members of the com-
SCORES
NBA Playoffs
Eastern Division Finals
Boston 112, New York 97, Boston leads
best-of-7 series, 2-0.
ABA
Eastern Division " Semifinals
Minnesota 106, Miami 99, best-of-7
series tied, 1-1.
Indiana 129, Kentucky 115, best-of-7
series tied, 1-1.
College Baseball
Belmont Abbey 4, Florida 2
Arizona State 1, Wisconsin 0
St. Francis, N.Y. 9, St. Peter's, N.J. 2

mittee who spoke on various as-
pects of the, proposed buildings.
Bob McFarland, a grad student
in the Law School, spoke on the
history of Intramurals at Michi-
gan. He noted that since the
Hoover Street IM and Woman's
Athletic Building were built, Mich-
igan has had no new construction
and has long ceased to be' a leader
in intramural facilities.
COMMITTEE v i c e-chairman
Rod Grambeau, head of Intra-
murals, discussed the two most
controversial areas of the proposal,
the use of student fees and the
location of the North Campus site.
Robin Wright, another student
member of the committee, spoke
briefly on the advantages that
the buildings would give the total
University community. She em-
phasized the importance of unit-
ing recreational and educational
pursuits. Bill Steude, Director of
S t u d e n t-Community Relations,
added a few closing remarks.

FOUR STUDENTS had request-
ed time to speak on the proposal.
,Two residents of Northwood Ter-
race spoke in opposition to the
Fuller Road site, citing several
factors that would make an un-
suitable site..
They contended that it would;
"be totally useless to North Cam-
pus residents" because it would be
at least one mile from current+
housing. They also contended
that "it would be unsafe to cross
Fuller Road" because it will soon+
be a high-speed, high-volume+
road.
They suggested that the Murfin
Road site would be a superior one1
because it would be a more cen-
trally located. They also suggest-1
ed that no fees be assessed until!
construction nears completion.
Representatives from IHA' andl
South and West Quads spoke
against the proposal. They argued
that since the University was suf-
fering financially, the money
gained from an increase in fees
could be put to better use. Since

not everyone would use these facil-
ities, they argued, it would be un-
fair to assess everyone equally!
for their construction.
SEVERAL OTHER s t u d e n t s
spoke against the proposal, with"
almdst all the criticism directed
either at the fees or the Fuller
Road site. Only one student seem-j
ed to be in complete agreement
with the committee.
Steude said afterwards that they
committee had not set the date
of their next meeting, but that it'
should be soon. Canham said he
was "especially disappointed by
the small turnout of students."
He said he could not predict what
the committee's next step would
be. But if they want the student
approval mentioned in their pro-
posal, today's meeting made it
apparent that they will have toj
wait.

1
1
1
4I

t3
I
1

1.000-
1.000
.500
.500
.000
.000

Atlanta 3 0 1.000
xSan Diego 1 0 1.000
Los Angeles 1 1 .500
Cincinnati 1 1 .500
xHouston 0 1 .000
San Francisco 0 3 .000
x-Late game not included.
Yesterday's Results
New York 9, Montreal 5
Chicago 11, Philadelphia 3
Cincinnati 3, Los Angeles 1, night.
Pittsburgh 6, St. Louis 1, night.
Atlanta 4, San Francisco 1, night.

Yesterday's Results
Chicago 3, Oakland 0'
Washington 6, New York 4
Minnesota at Kansas City, inc.
Seattle at California; inc.

UNIVERSITY CHARTER
FLIGHTS TO LONDON
July 8--August 17. ... . $214
'May 7-June 24.................$199
May 15-August 20 ....... ..... $204
June 27-August 25..$229
Phone 665-8489 1-5 P.M..-725N. Univ.
Sponsored by University of Michiban Graduate Assembly

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MONDAY, APR. 14-4 P.M.
Aud. B, Angell Hall

Belt Midrash t Ann Arbor
Sponsored by the College of Jewish Stodies in Detroit in
Cooperation with the B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation at the
University of Michigan
PRE-REGISTRATION-Spring, Summer, Fall 1969
Name ......
Address on June 1 Phone.......
Address on August 28...... Phone.....
University of Michigan year ... Major...........
Will be at Ann Arbor: spring OllA:.... summer (IIIB.....
fall .. .
Please 'check those courses you would like to
take and return this form to: 1429 Hill St., Ann
Arbor. Courses are described in the Bent-Mid-
rash Catalogue. More information will be made
available upon pre-registration.
Spring-Summer semester
1. Hebrew for Beginners (intensive, 2-3 meetings a week)
2. Intermediate or Advanced Hebrew
3. A Survey for Judaism II (for those taking No. 2
Can be taken independently immediately)

i

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SENIORS!
GET YOUR
Graduation
Announcements
FOLLETT'S
State St. at North Univ.

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G OLF SALE!

The Society of Automn'otive Engineers
wishes to thank all those people who worked on the
Road Rallye and all the sponsors:
B. F. Goodrich
Howard Cooper Volkswagen
Montgomery Ward
Village Inn Pizza Parlor
Standard Oil
Checkered Flag

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Fall semester, 1969

-

__

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4, Basic Judaism-Jewish Ethics
5. A Comparative Study of Biblical Literature
6. A History of Zionism in America
7. Introduction to Jewish-Arab Relations 1936-1969
8. An Advanced Seminar in Social Studies of Jewish
Communities in Europe and America
9. Introduction to Modern Literary Yiddish (beginners)
l f1. Intermediate Modern Literary Yiddish
11. Personal Worth and Collective Identity
12. Introduction to Jewish Musicology
13. Hebrew Language and Composition (beginners)
.14. Hebrew Language and Composition (intermediate)
. 15. Readings in Programmatic Thought in Hebrew
(Ahad Ha-Am, Haim Arlozoroff, Ben-Gurion
and Uri Avneri)
Please indicate here any other courses you would like to take-
or your comments:

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