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April 06, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-04-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

i

Shows a9
1 -3-5-7-9;

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:05 G' "
ACADEMY AWARD
NOMINATION
BEST ACTOR
CLIUFF ROBERTSON:

DIAL
5-6290

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

P

Sfarhiiut

Dailu

second front page

Sunday, April 6, 1969 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

I

I

the
news tday
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

Panel surveys student

CLIFF ROBERTSON4
COSaRkCLAIRE BLOOM}
TECNNICOLOR TECHNISCOPE
MOM WMAMA RELEASINCCORPORATION
EXTRAORDINARY "It's time to rejoice!"-RAPF LIFE Magazine
CASTS A SPELL. "In a season of remarkable performances Cliff
Robertson ranks with Joanne Woodward in 'Rachel, Rachel!'."
LOOK Magazine
U

DIAL
8-6416.

1

TODAY AT
1:15-3:45
6:15-8:45

"CONSTITUTES MORE OF AN
EXPERIENCE THAN A SHOW
-Time Magazine

THE ACCLAIMED MOTION PICTURE-JohnCasavetls'"FACES"

CZECHOSLAVAKIAN,. PRESIDENT Ludvik Svoboda report-
edly resisted pressure yesterday to make his country a Soviet
puppet state.
According to an unofficial memorandum, Svoboda was being
pressured to oust Premier Oldrich Cernik's government and run the
country himself under orders from Moscow.
The memorandum was said to have been issued by some mem-
bers of the Central Committee of Czechoslavakia's Communist party,
in order to provide information no longer available in the censored
news media.
The censorship is one of several measures taken by the Soviets
following last weekend's anti-Soviet demonstrations.
WEST GERMAN FOREIGN MINISTER WILLY BRANDT
called on the United States to participate in the proposed Euro-
pean summit meeting.
The all-European meeting, was suggested by the Communist War-
saw Pact last month to create a security system that would allow dis-
pensing with both the Soviet-supported military alliance and NATO.
However, Brandt said that any new security system "will require
both American and Soviet guarantees" to be effective.
The former Mayor of West Berlin also hinted that NATO's re-
cent offer of mutual troop reductions would be discussed at the meet-
ing.
Meanwhile, Brandt plans to visit both Canada and the U.S.,
where he will represent West Germany at the twentieth anniversary
meeting of the ministerial council of NATO.
PRESIDENT NIXON yesterday created an advisory council
to investigate reorganization of the executive branch.
The five member Advisory Council on Executive Organization
will evaluate the structure of the federal bureaucracy "in light of
today's changing requirements of government," Nixon said.
The President called on' the Council .to recommend both imme-
diate and long range solutions to organizational problems among the
government's 150 departments, agencies and commissions.
,The council's activities will parallel those of the Hoover Commis-
sion, which was headed by the former President. The commission
mapped1 out a major overhaul of the executive branch during the
Truman administration.
However, Nixoi said the new council will also seek solutions to
problems between the federal and state governments in administer-
ing domestic programs.
GEORGE ROMNEY, Secretary of Housing and Urban Devel-
opment has urged the expansion of the Model Cities Program.
Informed sources said yesterday the former Michigan governor
has asked President Nixon to include entire cities in the program,
i which is presently limited to deteriorating neighborhoods.
The program was begun by the Johnson Administration in 1966
to seek long term improvements in impoverished communities. Al-
though the program's efforts have been concentrated on securing as-
sistance from public and private programs, Romney is reportedly
seeking greater direct involvement by state governments.
The President's Urban Affairs Council is scheduled to discuss the
Romney proposals tomorrov(.
DIPLOMATS attempting to solve the dispute between Peru
and the United States will hold their final meeting tomorrow.
The dilemma was-precipitated last October by Peru's' expropria-
tion of property belonging to a subsidiary of Standard Oil of New
Jersey, an American company. The resulting p a r 1 e y has centered
around a federal statute which provides for suspension of U.S. aid and
sugar purchases within six months of the expropriation if Peru fails to
take appropriate steps toward compensation. The deadline for the
Peruvians is Wednesday.-
Peruvian leaders have hinted strongly that reprisals will result
if the U.S. applies economic sanctions.
* * *
AFL-CIO LEADERS will hold a closed three day conference
with high administration officials.
The union chiefs reportedly are seeking first hand accounts from
the new government leaders on issues vital to labor. Among the topics
to be discussed is the proposal for an increase in the minimum wage
from $1.60 to $2.00. The Nixon administration has already taken an
adverse stand on the proposal.
The conference, which will be held at a resort in-West Virginia,
will be attended by at least two cabinet member and other top of-
ficials.
THE SMOTHERS BROTHERS will sue the Columbia Broad-
casting System for cancelling their weekly television show.
CBS cancelled the popular comedy program yesterday charging
the Smothers had violated their contract by consistently failing to
deliver tapes of the program to the network in time for review by
CBS executives and local stations. Network officials say a review
is necessary because frequently the show contains "objectionable"
material.
The show's-cancellation brought to a climax the Smothers run-
ning dispute with CBS over taste and censorship.
Dick Smothers said yesterday the lawsuit is necessary "to save
the artistic integrity of television."

By RUSS GARLAND
The University Committee on
Drugs has sent out a survey to
1,000 University students in an
attempt to determine the types
of services and programs on
drugs students need and want.
The four page survey requests
information on history and ex-
tent of use, attitudes toward
drug education programs, and a
small amount of demographic
data. It was mailed out last
Wednesday.
David Patch, a member of the
committee said. "The students
were randomly selected by yom-
puter and no record has been
kept of to whom the question-
naires have been sent." The in-
troduction to the questionnaire
asks that they be returned un-
signed and without any other
identifying information.
Results of the survey will be
used solely by the program sub-
committee to plan drug educa-

tion programs and to guide pro-
grams its members are already
conducting.
"What I want to stay away
from," said Prof. Edward Bor-
din, chairman of the drug com-
mittee, "is a situation which
would create an odor and have
the politicos in there."
Any request for further use
of the findings will have to be
discussed by the entire commit-
tee and other administration
and student organizations.
According to Bordin, the pres-
ent survey "grew out of the pro-
gram subcommittee not vein.g
quite sure where the students
were in terms of drugs." Origin-
ally a much more extensive sur-
vey was planned but there was
insufficient time and money to
initiate it.
"The public health people felt
we should develop some pro-
grams for next fall," commented
Bordin.
The purpose of the survey is

to find out what the students
want, and the subcommittee has
no definite ideas at the moment
as to what sort of educational
programs might come out of the
survey.
"We are trying not to gear the
thing in such a way that it
places the committee in the
position of appearing to ccd e
out with a moralistic attitude,!
said Patch.
The abbreviated survey was
approved by the University Com-
mittee on Drugs, composed of
students, faculty, and adminis-
trators This unofficial commit-
tee was organized about a year
ago by Bordin who "thought it
would be a good idea for differ-
ent people involved in these
(drug) programs to get to-
gether."
The funds for the sirvey were
provided by student affairs of-
fice since the committee has no
budget.

w

rug use
The in-depth survey may be
conducted next year if a grant
for it can be obtained. However,
Bordin is doubtful as to whether
the funds will be available.
"We are hoping that the rough
survey will give us enougn re-
sults for next fall, but we vrould
hope that a larger survey would
enable us to carry out better
programs," said Bordin,
The broader survey would go
deeper into the issues which we
are going into now and would
get a feel for various student
sub-groups." There is also 'a
possibility that the faculty would
be surveyed, Bordin said.
The maim committee serves to
discuss and approve programs
and ideas which are subsequient-
ly carried out by one of three
subcommittees-program, mate-
rials, and survey. The commIt-
tee's major project previous to
this has been developing pro-
grams for use by dorm libraries.

*1

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Have you beena
tripping lately?
How about a week long trip
to New York via United Air-
lines?
M ICH IGRASr
CARNIVAL'S

-Daily-Sara Krulwich
Police arrest heckler at New York peace march

Marchers..
protest
Viet war
(Continued from Page 1)
Striding out at the head of the
march was Paul O'Dwyer, unsuc-
cessful Democratic candidate for
the U.S. Senate last November,
who ran as a peace candidate and
who was a strong supporter of
Sen. Eugene J.. McCarthy, (D-
Minn.)
In Chicago, strong winds blew
away signs and buffeted an esti-
mated 20,000 marchers who moved
through the downtown area in
an antiwar protest.
There was some heckling from
the crowd along State Street, but
no reported incidents.
Eight hundred policemen pa-
trolled the parade route, wearing
soft hats rather than blue helmets
in what was described as an ef-
fort to eliminate any appearance
of hostility.
Heavy rain in Atlanta, Ga.,
washed out antiwar workshops
planned for Piedmont Park a few
miles north of the Capitol. At the
park, three boys were fishing in
a lake.
In Key Biscayne, Fla., persons
protesting the Vietnam war, the
draft, and the proposed antiballis-
tic missile system, demonstrated
briefly yesterday near President
Nixon's Florida retreat, the Dade
County sheriff's office said.
In New York, parade organizers
handed out a statement they at-
tributed to Mrs. Nguyan Thi Binh,
deputy leader of the National Li-
beration Front at the Paris peace
talks.
"I warmly welcome your rally,"
the statement said, "demanding
the Nixon government end the
war, bring the troops home, and
get full freedom for black an d
Spanish-speaking people."
A group identifying themselves
as off-duty members of the arm-
ed forces, in civilian clothes, led
off the march in New York. They
wore white hats with the lettering
"GIs for Peace."
Thousands cheered at the Cen-
tral Park bandshell as some of
them burned what they said -were
military identification papers.
As the marchers passed 54th
Street on the way from the
Time Square area to Central
Park, bags and jars of black and
yellow paint were thrown from a
Sixth Avenue skyscraper. Police
and bystanders were spattered.

SOLUTION LIKELY: 'U' may cut
LSA faculty to meet aid to needy

F

I

SATURDAY
APRIL 12
1 P.M. to 1 A.M.
YOST FIELD HOUSE

DOOR PRIZE
Rides
Refreshments
Booths
Games Q

on, language issue
(Continued from Page 1) putting languages' on pa
satisfaction of the humanities dis- a part of a larger policy
tribution requirement. ing' the whole college o
The majority report received thef ,s
most support as a "concrete pro O'Neill said his depart
posal" among the respondents to long supported pass-fail
the poll. It was followed closely by uages. However, he did
the minority report of the com- is particularly significan
mittee. supported this for some
The pass-fail change seems to just not an issue," he s
have garnered support among the The faculty will also b
faculty, mainly because it does ed tomorrow with propos
not propose any broad major low substitution courses
changes in the requirement. This lanyuiage requirement it
is the type of ch;ange that 'could studies or courses in otl
likely receive enough support plines. However, these co
among professors to carry it ed extremely poorly in
through. In addition the facul
"It's in the cards that the cur- pected to approve estab
rent language requirement w i'l I concentration program
be reduced," says Prof. Donald stndenThenprogramI
Brown, of the psychology depart- studies. The program
ment. earlier approved by the c
Brown also said he supports committee.

students

ass-fail ast
of grad-
cn a pass-
ment had
for lang-
n't see it
it. "We've
time. It's
says.
e present-
sals to al-
for t h e
n cultural
,her disci-
urses far-
the poll.
ty is ex-
blishing a
in black

(Coptinued from Page 1)
cipating departments have s u r -
pluses in their budgets, although
others will have to be "wringing
the towel" to find enough money.
Smaller appropriations were re-
quested to hire more staff mem-
bers as counselors and coordinat-
ors. But since these also h a v e
been refused, Brown says the of-
fice "will have to make more posi-
tions out of the money we have
already."
Brown says the "main reason
we're coming out all right in staff-
ing is that senior officers are re-
signing which enables us to hire
newer people at lower salaries."
However, Brown points out that
although the office will have
enough staff these new people will

f
k

"ONE
OF T
YEAP
TEN1
-Hop
anid A
Saturn

HE E MOST
R+S DAZZLING
BEST!" DIRECTORIAL
s Alpe tDEBUT OF
Arthur Kight, "THE EA :
day Review R
Q . -TimeMagaz'ne
SUNDAY
j t 3:00 9:00,
7:00, 94
MONDAY
7:00, 9:00
q - Photograph by
Mchael Sae
4 Copyright 1968
< r r Twentieth Century Fox
Film Corporation

Chili BUILD
in cooperation with the
Center for Chinese Studies
MONDAY, APRIL 7
THE CHINA STORY

NATINALGENEAL ORPOATIN _

Now.
Showing

FOX N EASTERN THETRES
FOX VILL5E
375 No. MAPLE RDl.*7691300

MON. thru FRI.
6:30 & 9:15
SAT.-SUN.
1:00-3:45
6:30-9:15

These Nazis
aren't for real!
They are Allied agents
who must win
World War II

CINEMAWIj
TUESDAY, APRIL 8
The first in a series of
retrospective showings of
colrlectedworks of major
American Independent
Filmmakers.
IN PERSON
ROBERT NELSON
Award Winning West Coast Filmmaker

had been 'be inexperienced and can very
urriculum likely slow down the efficiency of
the entire operation.

I

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U,

"FREE, TENDER, IFE-LOVING, CREATIVE AND CONCERNED ABOUT VALUES,
A Mll IFII IN WHIPflINTFRRAClIAI FXIAIITY' I A SIMPIF FACT RATHFR

Il

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