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April 04, 1969 - Image 8

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-04-04

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Rage Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Fridcav. Aaril 4. 1 969.

Page Eight THE MICHLGAN DAILY

1rIdnv A nr jil1Td1 .+ '

11

Clendenon
HOUSTON (M-The Houston Clendenon and outfielder
Astros concluded the Donn Clen- Alou.

controversy

finally

ends

Jesus

denon. controversy yesterday by
accepting two young pitchers and
an undisclosed amount of cash
from the Montreal Expos.
Roy Hofheinz, owner of the
Astros, then said he is dropping
a federal suit for a minimum
$10,000 in damages from the
Expos.
Houston obtained John Billing-
ham, 26, Montreal's number two
or three starting pitcher, and
Skip Guinn, 24, a left handed. re-
liever the Expos obtained from
Atlanta in the National League
expansion draft. Billingham was a
right hand relief pitcher last year
With Los Angeles. Hofheinz said
the the settlement was worked out
after Houston rejected Wednesday
another offer by Montreal to send
Clendenon to the Astros.
The controversy, that once had
Baseball Commissioner B o w i e
Kuhn demanding and receiving a
written apology from Hofheinz,
dated back to a Jan. 22 trade in
which Houston sent outfielder
Rusty Staub to Montreal in a
straight deal for first baseman

. Clendenon visited the Astro-
dome and indicated he was pleased
with the trade but last month
abruptly asserted that business
commitments had forced him to
decide to retire from baseball.
Houston claimed the retirement
nullified the deal. Staub added
complications by saying he would
not return to the Astros. Kuhn
eventually assigned Staub and
Clendenon to Montreal and Alou
to Houston and told the two clubs
to work out satisfactory compen-
sation for Houston.
Clendenon changed liis mind
again Wednesday and signed a
two-year contract with the Expos.
Clendenon's value to the Expos
will largely come from his prowess
at the plate. The former Pitts-
burgh Pirate star once hit .299
and should find the short fences
at :the stadium in Montreal well
within his range.'His return gives
the team an additional bonus on
the dear they made to get Staub
one of the bright young hitting
stars of baseball.
Hofheinz and Spec Richardson,
Astio general manager, said they

mentum. The end of this means
a relaxing feeling because this
has been a big cloud hanging
over us all spring," Walker said.
Hofheinz said be thought the
filing of the law suit had played
a major role in resolving the cor-
troversy.
"We now have fair compensa-
tion in terms of players," he said.
"The suit will be dismissed be-
cause there is no need to beat a
dead cat."
Hofheinz was asked if he were
displeased with thehmanner in
which Kuhn had handled the
situation.
"That would be inappropriate
to discuss," he said. "We are
satisfied with the final results but
not with the time it took."
In separate deals, Richardson
said Steve Shea and Howie Reed,
young righthanded pitchers, had
been sold to Montreal and that
Houston's Oklahoma City farm
club had sold another righthander,
Leo Marentette, to Montreal's
Vancouver farm club.
Billingham was the first pitcher
acquired by Montreal in the ex-
pansion draft. He has been basic-
ally a relief pitcher during six
years in the minors and one with
the Dodgers.
Guinn has struck out an aver-
age of more than one batter per
inning throughout his career. He
played at Richmond, Va., and
Shreveport, La., last season prior
to reporting to Atlanta.

'The Pearl' given warrant
Cardinals sell Bo Belinsky
By The Associated Press
* BALTIMORE -- Earl "The Pearl" Monroe, star player of the
Baltimore Bullets of the National Basketball Association, was served
yesterday with papers declaring him to be the father of a boy born to
an unmarried nurse's aide.
Baltimore city deputy sheriffs handed Monroe the paternity suit
warrant at Friendship Airport when he got off a plane with his team-
mates from New York City, where they lost the fourth and final play-
off game Wednesday night to the Knicks in an Eastern Division
semifinal.
0 ST. LOUIS- The St. Louis Cardinals announced yesterday
they have sold the contract of lefthander Bo Belinsky to Hawaii of
the Pacific Coast League, a California Angels farm team.
The Cardinals asked waivers on the much publicized pitcher
Monday.
In four spring appearances with the Cards Belinsky hada 1.95
earned run average in 12 2-3 innings. He struck out 10 and walked 16.
* * *
0 LAKELAND, Fla. - The Detroit Tigers dropped eight players
yesterday in trimming down to the 25-man limit for opening day.
Veteran pitchers Roy Face and John Wyatt were released, while
at the same time Dick Radatz, a former American League star relief
pitcher, managed to pick up a contract.
Pitchers Les Cain and Bob Reed; catcher Joe Cernich and out-
fielder Wayne Redmond were returned to Toledo, as were catcher
Hector Valle and pitcher Tom Timmerman.
! LONG BEACH, Calif. - The stretched-out National AAU in-
door swimming and diving championships get underway today for
men and women, with finals in the various competitions set for next
week.

0

John Billingham
accepted the two young players
and cash in that they were no
longer interested in Clendenon be-
cause of his heavy business com-
mitments and because of the high
level contract he signed Wednes-
day with the Expos. Manager
Harry Walker agreed.
"Despite all the ramifications
of this situation, the morale of
our club is at a high point now
and the high priced contract of-
fered to Clendenon by Montreal
would not have been, worth the
risk of disrupting this high mo-

I;

Donn Clendenon

. ZA(f

NORTH (AMPUS (OMMITTEE

NEEDS SIZE AND SPEED:
Moeller expects run at roses,

41

presents

- -- -_ ~

a Little Club

with

"THE JOHN HIGGINS

NOTICE
NON-NATIVE SPEAKERS OF ENGLISH
All speakers of English as a second language* are
invited to take part in an experimental test of English
language proficiency to be given in AUDITORIUM
A, ANGELL HALL AT 7:15 P.M. ON THE 9th OF
APRIL. You will receive $5.00 for approximately
1 12 to 2 hours of your time. If you are interested
you must call and register at the following number
764-2416 on or before April 8th.

QUINTET"

FREE!

Fri., April 4, 1969
Bursley Snack Bar
9-12 P.M.

'NO ELI STUDENTS CURRENTLY ENROLLED IN
TENSIVE ENGLISH COURSES ARE ELIGIBLE FOR'
AT THIS TIME.

THE IN-
THE TEST

By TERRI FOUCHEY title. He and the rest of the team
elievable as it may sound to did not go to the Rose Bowl be-
Moody Hayes and' the ma- cause t h e faculty voted against
of Ann Arbor's population, letting the team participate.
exists a former Ohio State Like many Ohio State athletes,
1 player who would like to Moeller has a p u r e Ohio back-
chigan win the next Rose ground. He went to Ohio State af-
ter lettering in t h r e e sports in
Moeller is the man who high school. There he devoted his
this shocking ambition of energies solely to football and was
tg his former coach of team captain and All-Big Ten in
tnd victory this coming No- his senior year.
' 22nd. But considering the Moeller coached football for
at Moeller is the new Mich- three years at Belle Fontaine (O.)
efensive coach, the ambi- high school before moving up to
not unusual. Miami to join Bo Schembechler's
ever, he hasmotivesdbesides staff. He is another of the coaches
normally attributed to a Schembechler brought along from
who wants to see his team Miami.
tgood season. Moeller was Now that he has been given a
backer on the 1961 Ohio second chance to spend Christmas
eam that won the Big Ten in the sunny environs of Pasadena
--- - -- -- Moeller plans to take advantage
of. it. He feels this year's Wolver-
ines are a team capable of ful-
filling his wish.
Moeller is confident for several
reasons. "We have a great deal of
returning personnel a n d they
should be able to continue on with
last season's record. This will not
be a rebuilding year because of
our experienced players."
One of the main goals of the
new staff is to return to the great
winning tradition of Michigan
football and "last season is an ex-

I I

t 1.

Richard

Balzhiser

cellent foundation to begin with."
After viewing the films and the
first few days of practice, Moeller
thinks there are several good pros-
pects. "None of them, obviously,
is experienced in our type of de-
fensive setup, but t h e majority
have an asset to both :themselves
and the staff, in t h e i r playing
time experience."
Moeller considers this type of
experience helpful to a player, but
it is not his so 1 e criterion for
judgment. "The abilities to move
and react quickly are the m o s t
necessary qualities for a defensive
player, especially for an end." He
places these before size, b u t he
adds, "The ideal player would
naturally have size and be ableuto
move. From looking at the pros-
pects, I'm hopeful that this year
we may possibly find a player with
both these qualities."
O t h e r characteristics which
Moeller looks for in his players are
toughness a n d aggressiveness.
However he combines the ability
to be a team player with all his
standards,. "If they think about
the team first and carry out their
responsibilities in that area, they'll
be an asset to the team and a good
player."
Moeller said that the first prac-
tice sessions have gone well and
he was pleased with the good at-
titude on the field. "I've also seen
a couple good sophomore end can-
didates, but their biggest obstacle
is to overcome t h e experienced
players."
He related that the leading
problem for the new staff is that
more time must be devoted to the
teacher-learning process t h a n a
returning staff is faced with.
"Teaching the players our system
and trying to fit their talent into
it is our main goal for spring prac-
tice."
The established players with
their already known skills will
provide a good base for this pro-

cess. With the eager sophomores
Moeller has coming up that are as
yet untried, the presence of the
material can be likened to pieces
of a puzzle.
Hopefully the talent pieces will
fit into the jigsaw puzzle of plays
he has prepared for them. When
all the pieces are p u t together
they may show Gary Moeller sit-
ting in a bed of roses.
Friars have
trac strouble
cPROVIDENCE, R.I. OIP) - The
12 members of the*Providence Col-

4'

I1

41

proudly proclaims he

is a ROMNEY REPUBLICAN

I

E

B

a
Ip

Tai

DIFER

Examine the Balzhiser Record on

5 vital issues

. FAIR HOUSING

from the street. The vote was taken while the' city administrator
and city planning chief (who were negotiaitng with the developer
at the time) were on vacation. (Ann Arbor News, Aug. 31, 1965)

BALZHISER was one of only three Republican councilmen to vote
against Ann Arbor's 1965 Fair Housing Ordinance. He also un-
successfully tried to amend the ordinance to exempt single-family
homes from its coverage. (Ann Arbor News, Dec. 21, 1965)

s VIETNAM

9 PUBLIC HOUSING

BALZHISER, in 1965, introduced a resolution praising the conduct
of the war and condemning civil disobedience by Vietnam pro-
testers. Earlier he had voted to deny a parade and loudspeaker
permit to the 'National Committee Against the War in Vietnam.
(Ann Arbor News, Oct. 12, 1965)

BALZHISER moved to cut the public housing program in half.
When his amendment to reduce the number of units from 200 to
100 was defeated, he voted for the program. (Ann Arbor News,
April 19, 1966)
* 26 STORY APARTMENT BUILDING
BALZHISER voted for approval of the new 26-story apartment
complex without guarantees of adequate parking and set-back

. PARK-RECREATION

BALZHISER moved to cut the size of the Park-Recreation Bond
issue by $400,000. If the amendment had been passed, the slash
would have eliminated the only swimming pool facility easily
accessible to students. (Ann Arbor News, Feb. 15, 1966)

ON

MONDAY

44

APRIL 7

VOTE

ROBERT

H

RRIS

1,

for

0

{i

'i

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