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April 04, 1969 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-04-04

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S- . .

I

NOW SHOWING
FEATURE TIMES
Thurs., Fri.
7:00-9:00
Sat., Sun., Mon., Tues,
1-3-5-7-9

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

4I,

aait~j

secono front page

3020 Washtenow, Ph. 434-1782
BetweenYpsilanti & Ann Arbor

Friday, April 4, 1969 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

ANANDY'S A
X - A IE EPR E A C H E R ..IN r
THE WACKIEST n I-
ENTERTAINMENT Im
EVER {.AUNIVERSAL PICTURE .TECHNICOLORD

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Shows at
1-3-5-7-9:05
ACADEMY A
NOMINATI
BEST AV
CLIFF ROBER'
CLIFF ROBERTSONs
coARM LAIRE BLOOM
TECHNICOLOR' TECHNISCOPE'
.. .[Ou RAMA AE fASINO CORPORAT1O

AWARD
ON
TOR
TSON ...

DIAL
5-6290

ta den
By BOB FUSFELD
Ann Arbor high school students and
administrators are again clashing over
the issue of a free press.
Carla Houser, a Pioneer High stu-
dent, was temporarily suspended Wed-
nesday for passing out "unauthorized
literature" - an underground student
paper.
The problem has also stemmed from
confiscation of copies of the Ann Ar-
bor Argus. Argus editor and publisher
Ken Kelley says ,he plans to "go be-
fore the school board and lay the is-
sue on the line."k
Board of Education rules require all
matter distributed on school property
to be written by students or faculty.
The regulations also stipulate that "no
material shall contain deliberate mis-
quotations, malicious ridicule, obscen-

dispute

high school

ity or be in violation of laws civil and
criminal."
Any literature which fails to meet
any of the regulations is considered
"unauthorized" by the administration.
Students who are found to be respon-
sible are disciplined at the discretion
of the principal.
The board policy prohibits anony-
mous literature. All editors of any ma-
terials must sign the "articles of
agreement" which bind them to this
"free press policy."
Miss Hauser was suspended for pass-
ing out The Student Liberation Front,
a publication which protests the
board's policy.
The board policy was instituted last
spring following the appearance of an
underground paper, US.
The Student Liberation Front chal-
lenges the right of the school adminis-

tration to determine what literature
may be distributed on school grounds.
"J u s t because we go to school at
Pioneer High does not mean that we
have signed away our civil rights and
civil liberties," said one of the students
involved.
According to David Swain, a student
who passed out copies of the Argus,
which were later confiscated, "The ad-
ministration confiscated my copies of
the Argus and all the copies of the
Student Liberation Front."
Swain said that the high school ad-
ministration has been "constantly har-
rassing" students w h o have been
handing out both authorized and "un-
authorized" literature.
Kelley said he has conferred with
Argus Attorneys - "the top radical
attorneys in the country," - and they
agree that the action of confiscation

and authorization is "clearly discrim-
inatory."
He said that the actions violate free-
dom of speech in the high schools. "If
this action persists, we will take this
to court," Kelley added.
The entire issue of freedom of the
press will be considered at the school
board meeting Wednesday, including
Miss Hauseis suspension and distri-
bution of the Argus. Students are plan-
ning to attend the meeting.
Students also claim disciplinary ac-
tion is pending against another girl
for distributing unauthorized material.
Theodore Rokick, principal of Pio-
neer High School, said, "We're n o t
'conducting a witch hunt out here."
Rokicki explained that according to
school rules, students who distribute
unauthorized literature will be tem-
porarily suspended. He said that only

pre

s rules
the school board has the power to ex-
pel students permanently.
According to Robert Albano, a stu-
dent at the high school. "The admin-
istration and the student body are ap-
proaching a confrontation on the is-
sue of free press."
Lawrence Berlin, chairman of the
Local American Civil Liberties Union,
said that the issue raised by the sit-
uation is what limits can be imposed
on the First Amendment protection of
freedom of speech by public schools."
Scott W. Westermann, Superinten-
dent of Schools, was unavailable for
comment on the recent high school
events.
Prof. Joseph R. Julin, of the law
school, president of the school board,
explained that the board feels that its
policy is clearly within constitutional
limits.

r----

EXTRAORDINARY. "it's time to rejoice!"-RAPF, LIFE Magazine
CASTS A SPELL. "In a season of remarkable performances Cliff
Robertsonrranks with Joanne. Woodward in 'Rachel, Rachel !."
-LOOK Magazine

the
newstoday
by The AssociatedI Press and College Press Service

PRO TESTERS SHOP-IN

Welfare, group

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APRIL 4-5
LOVES OF A BLONDE
(1966) Milos Forman
(Fireman's Ball)
"Superbly naturalistic comedy"-Bil Clark

HOPES OF A DISARMAMENT BREAKTHROUGH between
the Soviet Union and the United States rose yesterday as the two
sides came closer to an accord banning military exploitation of
the sea bed.
The Soviet Union explained its draft treaty to demilitarize the
sea bed is not an attempt to bar communication and navigation aid
installations beneath international waters. It would allow for sub-
marine-tracking stations, provided they are constructed within ten
miles of the coast.
The two powers are still at odds on the position of conventional
weapons in the sea. An agreement will have to be reached first that
defines at what point a conventional weapon becomes one of mass
destruction. The latter fall outside the nuclear category.
THE VIETNAM PEACE TALKS were bogged down yesterday
in a barage of Viet Cong accusations.
The Viet Cong charged that progress reports were "cunning
treachery" on the part of President Nixon's administration. However
Lawrence Walsh, an ambassador for the U.S. refuted the statement.
Statements made by all powers left the two sides tightly dead-
locked as ever on the crucial question of troop withdrawals. The
United States continued pressure for a mutual pull-out of allied
and North Vietnamese troops, while North Vietnam and the NLF
reiterated demands for a U.S. withdrawal.
U.N. DELEGATES OF THE BIG FOUR POWERS began
yesterday to try to persuade Israel and the Arabs to end their
deadlock on a peace pact.
Gunner Jarrying, the U.N. special representative in the Middle
East will relay proposals from the fotgr powers to Israel and the

Teel yre rci nints " ho -in"'t.sec#

TONIGHT
at
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Arabs.
The ambassadors will be given a list of questions Jarrying NATIONAL OB5ERJANCE:
submitted to Israel, Egypt and Jordan along with their replies dealing
with various aspects of the situation. These will be the basis for dis-
cussion and hopefully produce a formula to spark an Arab-Israeli 1 Jg 'Y-m c h-7 . C ' -7 j:

"CONSTITUTES MORE OF AN
EXPERIENCE THAN A SHOW!"
-Time Magazine

I Li LQ lim di7

THE ACCLAIMED MOTION PICTURE-John Casavtes"'FACES'
THERE WILL BE A
SNEAK PREVUE
SATURDAY NIGHT AT 7:25

settlement.
However, Israel declared that any plan submitted by the four
powers will not be accepted and peace must come from negotiationsI
between Israel and the Arabs.I
CANADIAN PRIME MINISTER PIERRE TRUDEAU an-
nounced yesterday that his country will start a phase reduction
of her armed forces in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.
Trudeau told a news conference that Canadian forces were com-t
mitted to NATO until the end of this year. Further use of Canadianr
forces will be discussed at a meeting in May with the allies.i
PRESIDENT NIXON ANNOUNCED yesterday his choices for 1
four ambassadorships, including the dispatching of former Sen. t
Kenneth B. Keating (R-NY) to India.
Nixon also nominated career diplomat William Leonhart as am-
bassador to Yugoslavia, former Gov. Val Peterson of Nebraska as
envoy to Finland and Robert C. Hill, a New Hampshire businessman,!
as ambassador to Spain.I
Vice-President Agnew appointed Ann Arbor Mayor Wendell E.
Hulcher to the post of deputy director of the newly created Office
of Intergovernmental Relations.
* * *
GOV. WILLIAM MILLIKEN announced that Michigan mustI
create educational changes for all children before it starts pump-
ing money into nonpublic parochial schools.
In his special message on education, the governor urged "restraint
and reform" to keep the state's educational "crisis" from developing
to "disaster".
His plan i to institute a study to work on the problem of edu-
cational reform until Sept. 30. His recommendations would then be
sent to the legislature in October.
Milliken proposed a compromise to buy time until the study is
completed and the question of the constitutionality of parochiaid
decided.
TWENTY-ONE MEMBERS OF THE BLACK PANTHER
PARTY were indicted Wednesday on charges of conspiracy to
bomb five midtown Manhattan department stores.
Dist. Atty. Frank S. Hogan announced that the Panthers had
planned to bomb the stores, a railroad, a police station, and kill
policemen yesterday in an attack on "the white power structure."
Fifteen of the 21 were caught and pleaded innocent. They are
being held 'on $100,000 bail, an amount their lawyers felt was exces-
sive and unconstitutional.

iYJuiiiul 1(211 null 1L uUnIlia.

commemorate Rev.

By The Associated Press
The assassination of Dr. Martin
Luther King Jr. is to be mourned
today in silence, song, mass
marches, in memorial services and
in protest against the war in Viet-
nam
Just a year ago-April 4, 1968-
King stood on the Lorraine Motel
balcony in Memphis, Tenn, when
a bullet shot him down.
City dwellers and townspeople
across the nation will observe the

anniversary. The largest is that
planned for Memphis,.
The University has cancelled
classes from 11 a.m. until noon
for a memorial tribute to Rev.
King in Hill Aud.
However, the Black Student
Union plans to boycott classes for
the full day. They will be holding
a memorial service at the Canter-
bury House from noon until 3 p.m.
In the Law School, both the

Freehling, Brandt,
Shy wuin awards,

ii
Board
Law£
cated
jointl
at 9
At
18,00
marc
then
Ki
would
publi
and
then
Mrs.
Atlan
So
recog
Mayo
Wash:
day o
capit
Ne
say
rights
city's
Memr
Sev
coupl
tests
a pr
Antiw
ganiz
of th
Th
of th
phis,
all it
Th
holdi
mem
Mo
re-en
on N

pickets Sears
By ERIKA HOFF
Local welfare recipients took
action yesterday in their at-
tempts to receive credit from
Sears, Roebuck and Co.
About 12 welfare recipients and
20 student supporters took up
picket signs and marched to the
loda l Sears store where they form-
ed a picket line, shouting "Don't
buy at Sears."
The protest also took the form
of what National Welfare Rights
'! Organization (NWRO) executive
director George Wiley termed a
shop-in." Both welfare recipients
and student supporters w e n t
through the Sears store trying on
clothes and having sales clerks
ring up purchases.
When the time came to pay, the
shoppers would ask if the store
had a credit agreement with
NWRO and, learning that Sears
does not have such an agreement,
refused to purchase the articles.'
While some of the protesters
were busy downstairs. Wiley was
upstairs presenting the NWRO's
demands to the store manager,'.
Daily-Jay cassidy C. W. Jones.
ars Wiley said that Sears is dis-
-criminatory against welfare re-
cipients in its credit policy, and
the NWRO is demanding that
members be given at least $150 of
revolving credit with a NWRO let-
ter of recommendation as the sole
credit reference. The charge would
be paid off at the rate of $8 a
month. The monthly welfare allot-
lot-Y ment for clothing is $9.
n tod ay Wiley says that the only require-
ment to receive this letter of
d of Directors and the Black recommendation is that the wel-
Students Alliancehave advo- fare. recipient be a member in
a boycott of their classes. A good standing of the NWRO.
ly planned program will start "There are safeguards to our
a.m. in 100 Hutchins Hall. proposal," .says Paul Haywood, a
noon, in Memphis, up to welfare rights organizer. "A per'-
0 people are scheduled to son has to be a member of a wel-
h to the Lorraine Motel and fare group for three months be-
to 'City Hall. . fore he could get a credit refer-
ng's widow said yesterday she ence."
d participate in none of the Jones said Sears' credit policy
c memorials. "My children is to consider "the extension and
I will visit. the cemetery and amount of credit a personal mat-
return home for the day," ter." "Each application for credit
King said from her home in is decided upon individually," he
ta. said.
me cities have taken official Wiley blasted Jones' position
nition of the anniversary, saying, "That's exactly the type
r Walter Washington of of blank-face response we got in
ington, D.C., proclaimed "a Jackson. Thisris why Detroit
f memoriam" for the nation's burned, and Watts burned, and if
al. Sears stores start burning it will
w York Mayor John W. Lind- be because of blank faces like
sent five young men, civil yours."
s activists in Harlem, as his Before leaving the store, 12 wel-
official emmisaries to the fare recipients and at least one
,phis march. n University student applied for re-
heral mourners planned to volving charge accounts. They
e their observances with pro- were told by the Sears credit
against the war in Vietnam, office that it would take 24 hours
otest King had advocated, to process the applications.
war forces in Baltimore or-
ed a "death watch" in front Wiley says the purpose of yes-
e U.S. Custom House. terday's demonstration is "to
e SCLC, which is a cosponsor 'harass Sears into giving us what
ie mammoth march in Mem- we want." The NWRO's ultimate
has scheduled programs in goal is an agreement with Sears'
s major cities. national office giving credit to all
e Philadelphia chapter is welfare recipients.
ng a three-day ecumenical Local recipients intend to picket
orial service, the Sears store again today at 3
urners in Selma, Ala., will p.m'. A nation-wide boycott of all
fact part of the 1965 march Sears stores is planned for Satur-
Montgomery that King led.'day.

T
H
I
S
S
H
E
R
F
F

Prof. William Freehling of the
history department has won this
year's Henry RusselhAward, one
of the highest honors the Uni-
versity can bestow on a faculty
member.
The $750 prize is granted in
recognition of Freehling's "dis-
tinguished scholarship and his
conspicuous success as a teach-
er and lecturer."
Freehling and two other fac-
ulty members have won Gug-
genheim Fellowship Awards the
University announced today.
Prof. Richard Brandt, chairman
of the philosophy department
and Prof. John Shy of the his-
tory department are the other
recipients.
The fellowships are awarded

to persons of the highest capa-
city for scholarly and scientific
research, as shown by their pre-
vious contributions to knowl-
edge. The grants are made to
assist the Fellows to further
their work in their respective
fields. 1
In the past Freehling has also
won the Allan Nevins Prize for
the best doctoral dissertation in
1964. The work, published two
years lat'er as Prelude to the
Civil War: The Nullification
Controversy in South Carolina,
1816-1838, won the 1967 Ban-
croft Prize from 'Columbia Uni-
versity. The Bancroft Award is
generally regarded as the high-
est honor for American history
scholarship.

.
4' -_

====711 IF

TONIGHT and SATURDAY
MARGE

1421 Hill St.
8:30 P.M.

N
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