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April 02, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-04-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

cii
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DIAL 5-6290
ENTERTAINMENT . . . a re-
markable story . . . an experience.
C I if f . Robertson's performance
could not be better."
-WINSTEDi N.Y. POST
ACADEMY AWARD
NOMINEE
BEST ACTOR-
CLIFF ROBERTSON
TECHNICOLOR'
TECHNISCOPE :..
"SO ABSORBING AND
SO GOOD THAT ONE
IS HELD FROM
BEGINNING TO END"
--COMMONWEAL
"Buena Sera,
Mrs. Campbell"
IS NEXT...
right after you
let CHARLY go!
.......

AlIRPORT
LIMOUSINES
for information call j
971-3700
Tickets are available
at Travel Bureaus or
the Michigan Union
32 Trips, Day
1TRAVEIL
FREE!,
All expenses paid
Take a trip
into your mind
Thursday at Hill
APRIL 3, 7:30 P.M.
with the
IRIS BELL
ADVENTURE

C14C

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atly

second front page

Wednesday, April 2, 1969 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

L SA offe
By ERIKA HOFF
"I'm still chasing down teaching fel-
lows who haven't turned in their grades
from last summer and students who
haven't done their papers or taken their
exams," complains Elaine Wilner of the
literary college honors counselling office.
Despite these difficulties, the Honors
Summer Reading Program is again of-
fering qualified students the chance to
receive academic credit for independent
reading done away from campus. This
year, however, Dr. Otto Graf, Director of
the Honors Program, intends to follow
the rules much more strictly.
Only students who are presently in the
college honors program or who have at

ors summer reading program

least a 3.0 grade point average are eligible,
and they may not be enrolled in any
formal academic program from May 1
to September on this or any other cam-
pus.
Through the program, students may
elect any two literary college courses pro-
viding the work can be accomplished by
reading alone. This excludes introductory.
language courses and lab sciences.
The only department that restricts the
number of courses it offers for the sum-
mer is the English department. This, ac-
cording to departmental personnel, is
necessary since the large number of Eng-
lish reading courses would overburden
the staff with administrative work,

Although only LSA courses are offered
in the program, any University student
may enroll. However, students not in the
literary college should check with their
counselors to insure accreditation of their
summer work.
Honors students need only the signa-
ture of their regular faculty counselor in
order to participate in the program. Non-
honors students must receive permission
from Dr. Otto Graf.
All students must be sponsored by a
faculty member in the department in
which they want to take a course.
Students in the program are responsible
for obtaining a reading list and other
course information from the course

supervisor before leaving campus for the
summer.
Some courses require a paper, and
most require a final exam to be taken
after the student returns for the fall
term.
Honors counselling office literature de-
clares that the program "was designed to
enable qualified students to engage in in-
dependant study. Summer elections in-
volving no class attendance have a
genuine educational value," states the
pamphlet.
Application forms will be available in
the Honors Counseling Office, 1210 An-
gell Hall, through May 2. The latest
date for dropping a summer reading
course is the second Monday in July.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2
One-Ey d Jacks
(dir. Marlon Brando, 1960)

7-9
662-8871

ARCHITECTURE
AUDITORIUM

I

SLAM SOVIETS:

75c

the
news to day
by The Associated Pes and College Press Service

Chi*nese begin

THE BIG FOUR POWERS split yesterday during a Middle
East debate in the Security Council.
Soviet Deputy Foreign Minister Jacob A. Malik threw his coun-
try's support behind an Asian-African resolution demanding con-
demnation of Israel for an attack on a Jordanian village last Wed-
nesday.
The United States and Britain objected to the resolution on
grounds that it did not mention attacks by Arab guerrillas on Israeli
territory that provoked the Israeli retaliatory raid.
The United States said it would abstain on the resolution, and
similiar action was expected by Britain. Western sources said they
expected France not to oppose the resolution.
Big Four peace talks on the Middle East are scheduled to begin
tomorrow.
PRESIDENT NIXON conferred with a dozen foreign leaders
yesterday including Vice President Ky of South Vietnam.
The foreign dignitaries flew to Washington to attend the furleral
of former President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Nixon devoted his entire
day to the private talks.
The substance of the meetings ,was not disclosed by White House
spokesmen.
However, Press Secretary Ronald Ziegler said Ky and Nixon in
their half-hour meeting reviewed the situation in Vietnam for the
first time since they last talked in Paris March 2 during Nixon's
European visit.
SECRETARY OF DEFENSE MELVIN R. LAIRD yesterday
outlined plans to curtail B-52 operations in Southeast Asia.
Laird said the slash in spending was necessary because Presi-
dent Nixon ordered all government agencies to make significant re-
ductions in the federal budget.
The $1.1 billion reduction, which includes a cut of $500 million
announced by Laird last month, will leave fiscal 1970 spending at
$77.9 billion.
The United States has been flying an estimated 1,800 B-52 sor-
ties a month the past year to dump massive loads of bombs on Viet
Cong in South Vietnam and adjacent areas of Laos.
This will be cut to 1,600 sorties monthly, Laird said, despite a
"strong recommendation" from Gen. Creighton W. Abrams, com-
mander in Vietnam, that the 1,800 rate be continued.
x
5,000 U.S. AIR CAVALRYMEN swept though jungles north-
west of Saigon in search of two Viet Cong divisions yesterday.
U.S. officers say the North Vietnamese 1st and 7th divisions
which eluded a 10,000-man sweep in the southern part of Tay Ninh
province may have been forced by battlefield losses in five weeks of
offensive action to retreat toward Cambodia.j
In Saigon, President Nguyen Van Thieu gave an indication that
secret peace talks already have begun between his government and
the Viet Cong's National Liberation Front.}
A presidential spokesman said Thieu did not regard as a rejec-
tion the front's strong public denunciation of his offer to conduct
secret talks.

!ongress
TOKYO (M - - The Chinese
Communist party opened its
long-delayed ninth party con-
gress yesterday in Peking.
At his first party congress since
1956, chairman Mao-Tse Tung
was reported to have made an
important address. But the radio
gave no details and so it is un-
known whether he heaped fresh
denunciation on the Soviet Union
for two border clashes last month.
Some observers believe the bit-
ter China-Soviet feud which has
erupted in the skirmishes was in-
tended to solidify the Chinese in
preparation for the party congress.
The Chinese since have accused
the Soviet leadership of anti-Com-
munist crimes.
Peking radio said the ninth
congress had three items on the
agenda-a political report by de-
fense minister Lin Piao revision of
party bylaws and election of Cen-
tral Committee members.
The new constitution would
make the party one of workers,
peasants and soldiers. It says
nothing about intellectuals or
about the Red Guards.
The radio reported the dele-
gates heard Lin's speech and are
to split into smaller groups today
to study the speech and revision
of party bylaws. There was no im-
mediate indication how long the
congress would last.
"The ninth party congress un-
der the guidance of Chairman
Mao is opened at a time whe,-
the proletarian cultural revolutioi'
is about to achieve a great vic-
tory," the broadcast said. "It is
being held at a time when we
have achieved sufficient conditions
in revolutionary politics, ideology
and organization."
Lin urged the congress to con-
tinue the cultural revolution and
to assume "combat duties," ap-
.plying experience from the rev-
olution and analyzing the domestic
-and foreign situation carefully.
The radio declared all the dele-
gates "were burning in fighting
spirit" and "this symbolizes the
significance of the congress, which
is being held at the time when the
country is about to achieve final
victory."~

-Associated Press
Funeral train passes through Charleston, W.Va.

ABILENE, Kan. - While a
funeral train bore his body
across the country yesterday,
Dwight D. Eisenhower's home
town of Abilene, Kansas pre-
pared to pay him final homage.
Army authorities estimated
between 50,000 and 100,000 per-
sons will flood into Abilene to
watch the funeral procession
cover the 12 blocks from a rail-
way siding to the gleaming Ei-
senhower Library where the: fu-
neral services will be conducted.
The special train bringing the
former president's body was ex-
pected to reach Abilene this
morning. Plans called for the
casket to be moved to a hearse
at 11 a.m. EST today.
Along the train's westward
route, thousands gathered yes-

terday in cities and villages, at
the few stops and at crossings in
tribute to the former president,
In Washington, Indiana, a
city of 13,500, crowds estimated
from 10,000 to 15,000 watched
the funeral train pass by.
Eisenhower was born in Deni-'
-son, Tex. His parents moved to
Abilene when he was a year old.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students of the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michi-
gan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year, Subscription rates: $9 by
carrier, $10 by mail.

THINKING
ABOUT

nog

TONIGHT
Don't miss Ann Arbor's-
only Marathon

1421 Hill St.
8:30 P.M.

PASSOVER?

I

I

HOOT

join us for
AN EXPERIMENTAL CREATIVE SEDER
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2-7:00 P.M.
Call for reservations and information:
BEFORE 5:00 P.M. ...... ............663-4129
AFTER 6:30 P.M...................761-8456
Sponsored by:
REFORM JEWISH ACTION COMMITTEE
and HILLEL FOUNDATION

(I
FRIDAY &
Accom

MUSIC WILL BEGIN - 50c -
AT 8:30 SHARP) New and Used
Music
SATURDAY
MARGE HIMEL
panied by GAIL KENDALL & JACK QUINE
BLUES & BALLADS

JA7&

iii

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Have you been
tripping lately?
How about a week long trip
to New York via United Air-
lines?

MICHIGRAS
CARNIVAL'S

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