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January 15, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-01-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'I

Wednesday, January 15, 1969
entral Student Judiciary
(formerly Joint Judiciary Council)
Announces Open Petitioning
for
FIVE SEATS
Sign up for interviews at SGC offices
1st floor, SAB
Petitions due Tuesday, January 21, 5:00 P.M.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

i _

BUT WHO IS WINNING?
Turning point of war nears;
cutback of U.S. troops likely

s

Page Three

-------------------------rw

DR. DANIEL JORDAN
Professor of Education-Univ. of Mass.
"Art and Spiritual lievelopmnent"
Filmed ballet: "Metamorphosis of the Owls" and lecture
A psycho-ballet used to aid personality development
Racklam Assembly Hall-Jan. 16,8SP.M
Sponsored by the Bahai Student Group

FIRST PART
EDITOR'S NOTE: It is almost a
year since the Viet Cong's biggest
blow struck in Vietnam, the Tet
offensive that tore into cities, towns
and miitary installations. Today
the war goes on but the feeling
is far different from that of a year
ago. This appraisal of the changes,
and the prospects, is by a reporter
who has covered the war for six
years.
By PETER ARNETT
SAIGON (M~ - This strange-
est of wars is moving toward
another turning point. There is
a general feeling that a cutback
in U.S. forces is coming, but
lack of agreement on what it
will mean.
Many see the tide of war run-
ning in favor of the allies now.
Others believe this view is valid
only if the political eddies swirl-
ing about the war are ignored.
And the enemy retains a poten-
tial to upset the best laid plans.
On the surface, the time to
begin leaving seems nearer than
at any period since the first
U.S. combat troops arrived
nearly four years ago.
Viet Cong forces appear in
disarray after a year of vast
bloodletting. Land and popula-
tion swallowed up in last Feb-
ruary's Tet offensive are being
recovered in huge slices by min-
imal forces. Allied casualties
are down.
Yet there is doubt that these
things point toward an end to
the fighting. Viet Cong forces
are still massed on the borders,
and a Frenchman who fought
in the first Indochina war ob-
serves:
"They are waiting in the
wings witing for the P a r i s

One critic believes that the
American troop commitment of
more than 500,000 men could
be cut by one-third, and yet in-
crease the performance by 25
per cent.
He believes also that the U.S.
commitment can be reduced
without increasing pressure on
the Vietnamese army.
Most knowledgable Ameri-
cans sayt h a t if the United
States decides to fight and not
talk in Vietnam, U.S. troops can
be thinned to a minimum of
200,000 within four years, and
100,000 within ten years, with
those 100,000 based there indefi-
nitely.
And American dead, which in
1968 doubled the total of dead
of all previous years in Vietnam
to- 30,551 by year's end, could be
expected to continue but in di-
minished porportions.

Vietnamese observers in and
out of the government see' the
current situation as less an'op-
portunity than a threat. They
think the whole power base of
the Saigon government is im-
periled not by an enemy slash-
ng down on the cities, as hap-
pened last February, but by a
more compliant adversary of-
fering a war-weary America a
way out through the Paris peace
talks.
"We fear most what we desire
most: peace," an elderly Viet-
namese intellectual, once a con-
fidant of the late President Ngo
Dinh, commented.
"We fear peace because it will
put us in an impossible situa-
tion. Or maybe we have just be-
come too used to war."
Tomorrow: Viet Cong Break-
down.

Spanish 'U' students protest
against strict Franceo policies

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'.1
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a

Mon Cheri! Lo
something ex
... but you do
where to fir

show to unfold."
These people detect an ob-
vious pattern of disengagement
of major enemy units, a delib-
erate slackening in tempo.
yIKTITAF
oking forj
(citing?
COME TO
Student Book Service
and visit
CINDY SZADY
MARY BENNETT
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mailed anywhere
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I {E OTTO PREMINGER presents
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Carol Channing - Frankie Avalon
It Fred Clark-Michael Constantine
...i...........j Frank Gorshin - John Phillip Law
w- Peter Lawford
Burgess Meredith - George Raft
Cesar Romero - Mickey Rooney
9_and Groucho Marx, playing 'God'

MADRID, Spain (CPS) --
There has been no rest for
Spain's universities this year.
Madrid, Barcelona and Seville
have been scenes of student
demonstrations and meetings,
which are banned by the gov-
ernment.
Students are p r o t e s t i n g
against university authorities,
who they say "always speak of
reforms and never implement
them," and against the govern-
ment of Francisco Franco, who
they accuse of openly opposing
university reforms'
At Barcelona University, stu-
dents fighting a g a i n s t bad
Steaching and what they consider
outmoded political views on the
faculty stormed lecture halls
and besieged several buildings.
Police surrounded the Faculty
(school) of Economics for sev-
eral days.
In Madrid students have been
holding meetings and have post-
Ied signs all over the city, plan-
ning actions to emphasize the
lack of freedom for Spain's stu-
dents and workers. 24 students

were suspended from the uni-
versity for their political ac-
tions; many of them fled the
country.
Students at several universities
have already begun to defy the
government's edict on "legal
student government," and to
elect representatives outsidethe
law.
In past years, the authorities
could rely to a certain extent on
the support of university teach-
ers, who habitualy were passive
to the politics of higher educa-
tion.
But this year teachers have
been activated around the is-
sue of their meager salaries.
Assistant professors at Madrid
University threatened last fall
to strike unless their salaries
were raised. Assured by the Min-
istry of Education that action
would be taken, they went back
to work. But if the authorities
fail to settle the dispute this
month, the teachers say they
will begin an unlimited strike.

the
Enewstoday
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
IN THE BIGGEST SEABORNE ASSAULT of the Viet-
nam war two battalions of Marines joined with other al-
lied troops yesterday in tightening a cordon around a
Viet Cong stronghold on Batangan Penninsula.
The 2,000 marines landed without opposition about 50
miles southeast of the big military base at Da Nang. They
hope to capture some 800 North Vietnamese and Viet Cong
troops.
* The Batangan Peninsula, the scene of the, first major
American battle of the war in August, 1965, is a resupply point
for the North Vietnamese and Viet Cong, according to U.S.
officers.
A SERIES OF EXPLOSIONS and a major fire broke
out on the aircraft carrier Enterprise yesterday, killing
thirteen and injuring 85 to 100.
The ship was about 75 miles southwest of Pearl Harbor
on a bombing training mission when the explosions occurred.
The Navy said the cause was not immediately known but said
at least one aircraft was involved. The nuclear power plant
that drives the carrier was not involved in the fire, according
to a Navy spokesman.
There is an unknown number of men missing. The Navy
expects the casualties to be heavy.
ATTORNEY GENERAL DESIGNATE John Mitchell
said yesterday he will employ wiretapping and electronic
surveillance to combat crime.
Mitchell, testifying before the Senate Judiciary Commit-
tee, said he felt it should be used carefully and effectivply
under the safeguards provided by Congress.
The Crime Control and Safe Streets Act passed by Con-
gress last year authorizes wiretapping and electronic eaves-
dropping by law enforcement officials, the Johnson adminis-
tration, however, has declined to make use of it.
GOV. WALTER J. HICKEL faces the Senate Judiciary
Committee and some strong criticism over his appoint-
ment as Secretary of the Interior.
In a departure from custom, Hickel took the offensive
and circulated a petition rebutting Senate criticism of his
views on conservation and water pollution by listing, his ac-
complishments in those areas.
Hickel will be questioned about his chairmanship of the
Anchorage Natural Gas Co., and directorship of the Alaska
Pipeline Co. Rep. Richard D. McCarthy (D-NY) contends that
there is a conflict of interest since both companies will play
a major role in the development of oil fields in Alaska.
THE SUPREME COURT opened the way yesterday
for blacks to breik what they contend is the discrimina-
tory hammerlock of union rules barring them from pro-
motion and better pay.,
In an unanimous decision, the court said members of an
Alabama railroad union had .the right to take complaints of
racial discrimination to federal courts without following pro-
cedures required by union rules.
The court said that previous decisions that gave union-.
ized employes, in some instances, the right to cut the red
tape of grievance machinery that can stalla complaint for,
years should be applied to the field of racial discrimination.
The black union members allege that the bargaining rep-
resentatives of the car employes have joined with railroad
employers to set up contrivances to bar them from promotion
because of race.

emu players series-
THE HOUSE
OF
BERNARDA ALBA
-a fiery drama of Spanish women
January 15-19
Quirk Auditorium
For Reservations Call 482-3453
(Weekdays, 12:45-4:30 p.m.)
All Seats Reserved at $175
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LAST 2 DAYS
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A UNIVERSAL PICTURE * TECHNIPOtOR' " PANAVISION-

1969 MICHIGAI

photographs by Richard Lee

Use this coupon

to reserve
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The
Blues
Confederation'
at The Depot House
ASHLEY, South of West Huron

A HOOT

Tonight and every Wednesday at

1421 Hill St
8:30 P.M.

.

I

N

an evening of endless musical variety
come and do your thing or sing along

THURSDAY-

9 P.M.--1

A.M.

Admission $2.00

JOHN ROSEVEAR--Discussion
Author of "Pot: A Handbook of Marijuana"
FRIDAY and SATURDAY-
PAMELA MILES and DAVE JOHNS
Blues and Contemporary

t

moomm
A

111

I

HELD OVER-2nd Big Week

DID'YOU ENJOY SEN. FULBRIGHT
LAST SEMESTER? THEN ENJOY
SEN. STROM THURMOND,
AT 8:00 P.M., SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, AT HILL AUD.

WRITER-IN-RESIDENCE PROGRAM
JERZY presents
JERZYKOSINSKI

TODAY
*10 A.M.-Noon Office Hours-
1631 Haven Hall

Noon Discussion-"Contemporary U.S.A.,
II The Marxist View"-Canterbury House

I - -

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