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April 01, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-04-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

DIAL 5-6290
ENTERTAINMENT . . "a re-
markable story . . . an experience.
C I if f . Robertson's performance
could not be better."
-WINSTED, N.Y. POST
ACADEMY AWARDA
NOMINEE
BEST ACTOR-
CLIFF ROBERTSON
TECHNICQLOR
TECHNISCOPE
"SO ABSORBING AND
SO GOOD THAT ONE
IS HELD FROM/
BEGINNING TO END."
-COMMONWEAL
"Buona Sera,
Mrs. Campbell"
IS NEXT
right after you
le CHARLY go!

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE:- 764-05'34

Ci4c

1M i itan

Datiy

seconid front page

Tuesday, April 1, 1969

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

--

the
news toeday
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

Gorman calls for student acti on

FOUR U.S. DISTRICT COURT JUDGES
Carolina yesterday ordered 20 of the state's
districts to submit desegregation plans to1
within 30 days.

in South
93 school
the court

Who would have.
suspected the sergeant?
ROD ANY
I1
E Q
--TECHNICOLOR'
SFROM WARNER BROS.-SEVEN ARTS i

FRIDAY-April 25-8:30 P.M.-FORD AUDITORIUM
PETE SEEGER
"l would place Pete Seeger in the first rank of American folk
singers."-Carl Sandburg
TICKETS: $5.50, $4.50, $3.50, $2.50. Available at Ford Audi-
torium, all Grinnell and J.L. Hudson stores, Wayne State University
and University of Detroit. Student Discount of $1.00 per ticket at
each price level for tickets purchased at Wayne State University or
.University of Detroit
Mail orders should include self-addressed, stamped envelope
Auspices: American Civil Liberties Union

In issuing their orders, the judges called on the defend-
ants to submit'"an acceptable plan of operation comfortable
to the constitutional rights of the plaintiffs.. "
In each of the 21 cases, Negro plaintiffs had complained
the districts had not moved swiftly enough to comply with
desegregation guidelines set by the Department of Health,
Education and Welfare.
Once the plans have been submitted, the plaintiffs will
have ten days to challenge the constitutionality of the plans,
the order said.
If HEW and a district cannot develop a plan in 30 days,
the court will hear arguments from' both principals and
enter a decree.
ELECTIONS today for two seats in Congress will test the
power of Barry Goldwater's name in southern California and the
influence of Hubert H. Humphrey and Sen. Edward M. Kennedy
in Wisconsin.
In California Barry Goldwater Jr., son of the 1964 Rep. presi-
dential candidate, is among 15 candidates seeking the seat vacated
when Rep. Ed Reincke (R-Cal.) became lieutenant governor
The election in Wisconsin is to fill the congressional seat which
Melvin R. Laird gave up to become President Nixon's secretary of
defense.
Democrats are using as much influence as possible in order to
gain the seat from the Republicans who have held it more than a'
quarter of a century.
Both Humphrey and Kennedy have come to Wisconsin to campaign
for their candidate, David Obey, assistant minority leader in the
State Assembly.a
M I
THE VIET CONG spring offensive has inflicted heavy Amer-
ican casualties, but their own losses have caused them to lessen
their attacks.
Allied officers estimated more than 20,000 North Vietnamese and
Viet Cong troops have been killed over the past five weeks.
However, military analysts refused to ignore the 37-day of-
fensive. They do not foresee any mass assaults, but anticipate con-
tinued rocket and mortar attacks on Saigon and other key points.
Analysts see the next couple of weeks as a period of assessment
by the enemy. They base their thinking on the fact that the Com-
munist command has failed to follow through with battle plans out-
lined in captured documents.
* * *
FRENCH PRESIDENT CHARLES DE GAULLE spent an hour
yesterday in private conversations at the White House.
Press Secretary Ronald L. Ziegler said he would not characterize
the meeting "necessarily as working sessions" but added that it
was quite possible the two leaders "discussed matters ranging beyond
courtesies."
When the White House announced last Sunday that De Gaulle
would call on Nixon, the President's spokesmen had described the
visit as a courtesy visit.
NIGERIA'S MILITARY CHIEF-OF-STATE, Maj. Gen.
Yakubu Gowan, said yesterday his country's air force would
continue to bomb Biafra.

By BARD MONTGOMERY
"The University must live up
to its commitment to admit
more black students," claims
Darryl Gorman, newly elected
member of Student Government
Council. "Out of 38,000 to 40,000
students, only 730 or 1.8 per
cent are black."
Speaking before a 'group of
Residential C o11e g e students
Sunday, Gorman also charged
that "five big organizations at-
tempt to run this campus." He
maintained that "The Daily,
UAC, IFC, Panhel, and IHA tend
to be manipulative" and to ex-
clude the interests of black
students.
Gorman focused his accusa-
tions on The Daily's editorial
policy, declaring that "just be-
cause The Daily is liberal or
radical or whatever, they don't

have any right to tell people
what to think.".
In an editorial listing endorse-
ments of SGC candidates, The
Daily rated Gorman "unaccept-
able."
In explaining his position on
black admissions, Gorman in-
sisted that because there are "so
few black students it is difficult
for the University to know what
blacks want;"
"One reason I ran," he said,
"was to make the University
more sensitive to the needs of
black students and to change
the elitist image of this Univer-
sity."
Gorman also urged students
"to become more involved" in
campus activities as a solution
to "manipulation" by major
campus organization's,
"Right now, students don't
really feel they have power,"

Gorman claimed. He believes
this was reflected in the turn-
out of 7000 voters for the SGC
election. "That's only one quar-
ter of those who could have
.voted," Gorman said.
Gorman reiterated the de-
mand of the Black Students
Union, which endorsed his can-
didacy, that The Daily be made
"more democratic and repre-
sentative" by the creation of an
editorial board.
"I wouldn't want the board
to be a reflection of studentor-
ganizations-they're already too
influential," he said. He indi-
cated that "the board should be
independent of student organi-
zations but reflective of indi-
vidual student opinions."
In addition to increasing black
enrollment, Gorman has called
for an appropriation to the BSU
to r

FINAL EISENHOWER JOURNEY

to evaluate courses in black
literature and history.
"The courses are ineffective
in striking at the heart of the
matter," Gorman claimed. He
advocates the establishment of
new courses in white racism and
other contemporary issues' to
better educate students in racial
problems.
Asked if SGC should take the
initiative in recruiting black stu-
dents and leading student in-
volvement in issues such as last
September's w e I f a r e march,
Gorman said he was "not in
favor of SGC initiating pro-
grams without knowing what
the BSU wants-they're closer
to the situation."
Gorman said the "BSU is now
defining its program for next
year." He reported that there
will be "more' involvement with
the community but the specifics
have not been determined."

cortege

goes

isas.

Help Peace the
World Together
PEACE CORPS
3529 SAB
until Friday

NATIONAL SEVERAL CORPORATION
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FOR VILUaG!
375 N.MAPLE R.D. .769.1300

ENDS THURSDAY,
Times: 7:00-9:00

Dean Martii
I-.
COLUMBIA PICTURES e
AN IRVING ALLEN production

s att Helm
swings
Wrecking
STECHNICOLOR┬░ Crew

WASHINGTON PS -- After
three days of pomp and cere-
mony, President Dwight D.
Eisenhower's body was put on
a train to be carried to Abi-
lene, Kansas where he will be
buried tomorrow.
An estimated 50,000 people
came to the Capitol yesterday
where the former president's body
lay in state. Representatives of
more than 120 nations we r e
among the 2,107 people invited to
the funeral.
Eisenhower's body was takeh by
hearse from the Capitol to the
Washington National Cathedral'
where Rev. Edward L. R. Elson,
minister of the National Presby-
terian Church gave ; memorial
service.
Elson said the entire nation was
grateful for Eisenhower's "kind-
ness and his firmness, for his com-
passion and mercy, for his warm
inclusive friendship, his transpar-
ent spirituality, his patience and
suffering, and for all that endear-
ed him to the multitudes of man-
kind."
From there the body was taken
to Union Station where it was put
on a train to be taken to K~ansas.
Eisenhower is to be buried near
his boyhood home in Abilene,
Kansas. The 1,300 mile Tourney is
expected to take 30 hours.
Tomorrow at noon ,military in-
stallations and major ships in port
will give "Ike" his final military
tribute in the form of a 21-gun
salute.
The funeral train is to travel at
50 miles an hour, with no cere-
monial stops along the route to
Abilene. When the train does halt,
it will be to switch tracks.
Nonetheless, officials in C I#n-
cinnati announced they plan a
memorial service Tuesday morn-
ing, as the train stops there.
President Nixon, who eulogized
the former President last Sunday,
will fly to Abilene tomorrow for
the burial service on the steps of
the Eisenhower Library in Kansas.
Yesterday was slated as a na-
tional day of mourning and many
schools, banks and businesses were
closed. Trains and busses stopped
for one minute in the Chicago
transit system to honor the de-
the ceased 34th President.
The three days of rites for the
78-year-old leader who died last
Friday were days of military pre-
cision and grief.
"Hail to the Chief" was played
as the coffin was taken from the
Capitol Rotunda. "Army Blue," the
West Point hymn, was played as
nine military pallbearers carried
the flag-covered coffin across the
concourse of Union Station to the
waiting blue and yellow railroad
car, draped in black.

Ii

Prime Minister Harold Wilson of Britain, a supplier of Nigeria's
military aid, concluded a four-day visit to that country yesterday
where he urged Nigerian leaders to reduce civilian bomb casualties
in Biafra.
However, Gowan charged that the Biafran regime had "stage-
managed" civilian casualties in raids by federal planes.
Visitors to the war-torn area have reported that the Nigerians 1 en t, S
have been bombing isolated hospitals, market places, schools, and
feeding stations in Biafra.
THE NATIONAL ACTION GROUP (NAG) vesterdavan-o

--Associated Press
Eisenhower lies in state at the Capitol

strikers ask
restructuring

* STARTS FRIDAY *

MGM presents a Jerry Gershwin.-iott Kastner picture starring
Richard Burton-Clint Eastwood -Mary Ure
"Where Eagles Dare"

nounced plans for anti-war protests in 42 cities on April 5-6 for
"resistance and renewal at the grass roots."
The plans call for a wide range of activities, including "teach-I
puts" at defense plants, death-watches at draft boards, freedom vigils,
memorial services for Martin Luther King Jr., Easter peace parades,
and freedom sedars on Passover.
M M
THE JUDGE who presided over the James Earl Ray case since
last summer died of an apparent heart attack in his chambers
yesterday.
Shelby County Criminal Court Judge W. Preston Battle was found
slumped over his desk by one of Ithe prosecuting attorneys in the
'Ray case.
Battle accepted Ray's March 10 plea of guilty of the murder of
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and sentenced Ray to 99 years in the
Tennessee state penitentiary in Nashville.
While Ray entered a guilty plea to the King slaying, he later
said he was pressured into doing so and would seek a review of his case.
Under Tennessee law, it would have been Battle, as the judge
who passed the sentence, who would have granted such a review.

(Continued from Page 1)
Fleming said the University
would provide any information it
has which is public. However, in-
formation the University has on
a confidential basis cannot be re-
leased, Fleming said. p
Members of the committee told
Fleming they could probably get
the information with a court
order..
However, Fleming doubted that
such an order could be obtained
and added that he would not re-
lease the information until there
was such an order.
"There is no better case for re-
leasing confidential information
on landlords than there is for re-

leasing confidential information
on students," Fleming said.
However, the president said he
would check to see what informa-
tion was confidential and what
could be released.
The strike , steering committee
also asked that the University
undertake building several thou-
sand units of low cost housing.
Fleming told the committee that
they should discuss that issue with
those administrators "directly in-
volved" rather than with him.
However, members of the commit-
tee claimed that only a policy
change from the top administra-
tors could direct the University to-
,ward the students' housing needs.
The strike steering committee
asked Fleming to make a state-
ment of support for the rent
strike, but he refused.

poet series
faces cuts
(Continued from Page 2)
ing circuit between colleges and
perhaps even high schools.
One such circuit now operates
between ten Michigan colleges.
A poet is invited to make the
circuit about once a term, and
the colleges guarantee him a
reading at each school and
about $125 for each appearance.
If such a program could be
established on a regular basis,
the University could afford to
bring in several major poets
without asking them to reduce
their fees.
The sort of regular exposure
to the literary arts which a
poetry reading program pro-
vides will, Hornback says, "teach
us to respond to people like the
writers-in-residence so that
when they are here, we can ap-
preciate and use them without
destroying them."

Lg1

Panavision@ and Metrocolor MGM

1 nrwr ii

_._ --,
i

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